AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA



LIFE MEMBER
1901 - 12th September
SIR EDWIN SMITH

HONORARY LIFE MEMBER
Mr. JOHN HAMMERTON


HONORARY MEMBERS

1887 - 13th September  Mr. C.B. WALKER
1887 - 13th September  Mr. PATRICK
1903  Mr. JAMES MUSGROVE - FOUNDATION MEMBER
1904 - 10th February  Mr. C.V. WATTS - FOUNDATION MEMBER
1906 - 14th March  Mr. ROBERT HARVIE



CATALOG 1905




Tuesday 19th June 1883  Page 5 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Tuesday 19th June 1883  Page 6 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The first meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held last evening at the office of Mr. A. Flegeltaub, 216 Little Collins street east, at which there was a large attendance including amateurs from different parts of the colony. Dr Browning occupied the chair and after the adoption of a number of proposed rules the meeting adjourned to the following Monday, closing the proceedings with drinking success to the new society in bumpers of champagne.


OUTING ON THE MOORABOOL
GORDON COLLEGE and the AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION




Thursday 28th June 1883  Page 3 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Thursday 28th June 1883  Page 3 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The adjourned meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held at Mr. A. Flegeltaub's office, Little Collins street east, on Monday evening, Mr. John McEwan being in the chair. The proposed rules and by-laws were further considered and after discussion the majority of them were adopted. The meeting proceeded with the election of officer bearers for the ensuing year, with the following results: President, Dr J.H. Browning; Vice Presidents, Messrs Edgar C. Bell and John McEwan; Hon.Secretary, Mr. H. Brown; Hon.Treasurer, Mr. James J. Fenton; and the following gentlemen as members of committee, Messrs J.H. Harvey, R.H. Taverner, J.H. Thomas, J. Pettigrew and J.H. Wilkinson. The objects of this association are the exchange of photographs, the interchange of ideas and suggestions relating to photography and the formation of a closer acquaintance among amateur photographers in this and other colonies.



Wednesday 4th July 1883  Page 9 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria held its second monthly meeting on Monday last. The officers for carrying on the business of the association were elected, Dr Browning being the president and Mr. J.H. Brown the Hon.Secretary. Nearly 30 members have already joined the association and there is every prospect of it becoming a very useful organization to amateur photographers and those who are interested in the art science of photography.



Tuesday 7th August 1883  Page 7 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria held their usual monthly meeting at 216 Little Collins street east last evening. The vice president, Mr. J. McEwan, occupied the chair. Mr. Musgrove, of Greenvale, exhibited some specimens of his own work, explaining his mode of operation in the preparation of transparencies, the making of the dry plates and printing, in a frame of his own invention The samples of stereo transparencies exhibited were of very good quality. They were placed side by side with plates of the best French manufacture and showed to advantage in the sciopticon. His remarks were thoroughly practical and just suited to the wants of the amateur photographers, of which there was a large number present. Eight new members were nominated and the usual routine business transacted.


MAGIC LANTERN, SCIOPTICON, circa 1880 - 1900
DIMENSIONS: 315 mm (HEIGHT), 137 mm (WIDTH), 433 mm (LENGTH)


Irregular shaped object manufactured in metal, glass and wood, with some brass plating. The base of the projector is wood upon which sits the metal casing for the glass lens. There are three holes in each side of the wooden base for ventilation. The circular lens at the front of the object is encased in brass and the main body is also tubular. At the rear of the projector there is a circular opening which allows access to the illuminant chamber. This is covered by a brass flip lid with a small hole in the center of it. Below the lid is a movable bracket with two brass illuminant controls.



Wednesday 5th September 1883  Page 10 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The ordinary monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Monday evening, at the society's rooms, 216 Little Collins-street east. About 40 members were present. A paper on photography was read by Mr. Taverner, in which he traced the art from its infancy to the present stage. The sketch was interesting and instructive. It elicited warm approval and was the first of the kind read before the society. A member exhibited an improved bi-ocular camera with new instantaneous slides and the Hon.Secretary submitted some transparencies taken by the chloride emulsion process. A novel idea was shown by Mr. A. Flegeltaub in the shape of a negative and transparency, taken without a camera or lens by direct printing from a picture. This gentleman also worked out and explained the process of obtaining enlargements at night, with the aid of the sciopticon and presented an enlargement so obtained to the society.



Wednesday 3rd October 1883  Page 5 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria held their monthly meeting at 216 Little Collins street on the 1st October. A large number of members were present. During the evening a number of collodio-bromide emulsion transparencies manufactured by Mr. J.H. Brown, Hon.Secretary of the association were exhibited. A very interesting paper on photo-mechanical processes was given by Mr. Hart during which a number of specimens of work under consideration were exhibited. A very profitable and enjoyable evening was spent.


LUDOVICO HART
Born 1836 England
Died 1919




Thursday 8th November 1883  Page 7 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Friday 9th November 1883  Page 6 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

At the last meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria the president (Dr Browning) gave some useful information respecting the production of transparencies for the magic lantern. A number of beautiful specimens were presented and experiments in developing dry plates were given by that gentleman. The treasurer of the association (Mr. J.J. Fenton) produced some very fine specimens of enameling and showed the modus operandi by which they were produced. Such practical experiments given by the above named gentleman could not fail to be of great benefit to the members present.



Thursday 6th December 1883  Page 8 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The usual monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Monday evening at the office. Mr. J. McEwan read a paper describing some of his experiences more particularly in relation to stereoscopic work. Both the scientific and practical sides of the subject were explained in a lucid manner and the value of the whole was considerably enhanced by the exhibition of the camera, which is used by the author of the paper for his ordinary work. He explained how pictures of this class may be produced by the use of one lens instead of the twin lenses which are generally employed and submitted a number of stereo views of his own production, which were shown in the revolving stereoscope. These were taken on various forms of dry plates, some being with the old dry collodion and others the more recent gelatine. Acting on a suggestion thrown out by Mr. Pettigrew, it was decided to organize an excursion of the members during, the coming holidays for photographic purposes.



Tuesday 15th January 1884  Page 7 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The usual monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on the 7th January, at the society's hall, Mr. John McEwan the president, in the chair. Mr. Levens read a paper on the production of prints of various colors from the ordinary negatives by both the ferro-cyanide and ferri-cyanide processes and modifications of them the details of which were also given. Specimen prints in blue, green and orange were handed round and as the mode of obtaining the two latter colors was discovered by the author of the paper considerable interest was attached to them. The members proceeded to examine the work done by those who joined in the Boxing Day excursion. The prints of Mr. Musgrove's work were the subjects of special praise as they were really excellent productions and had been taken on dry plates manufactured by himself. The above gentleman has also shown various modes of making dry plates both by precipitating the emulsion with alcohol and other methods. On the occasion of the Boxing Day excursion the changing and development of some large plates were conducted in a portable dark tent, the invention of Mr. A. Flegeltaub. It is very light, portable and roomy and was much esteemed by the members.



Thursday 7th February 1884  Page 9 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on the 4th inst, the vice president (Mr. J. McEwan) in the chair. After the election of new members, a paper was read by Mr. Vanheems on "Silver Printing". The whole of the processes through which a print passes from the sensitizing of the albumenised paper, through the toning, fixing, washing and mounting processes, were taken into consideration and after the reading of the paper were thoroughly discussed the subject being one of great interest to the members generally. The subjects decided on for next meeting were "Lantern Transparencies" and "Re-touching Negatives".



Saturday 8th March 1884  Page 12 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Monday evening. The president, Dr Browning was in the chair. After the election of new members, a short paper was read on retouching by Mr. Newling. Following this there was an exhibition of transparencies in the optical lantern. Slides exhibiting various modes of preparation were passed through, amongst them being wet collodion, gelatino-chloride, gelatino-bromide and tannin plates. Some of those showed failures as well as successes, the causes of failure being explained and the details of the methods of producing those which were successful pointed out. After the discussion, in which most of the members took great interest, the meeting closed.



Thursday 10th April 1884  Page 10 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Monday 14th April 1884  Page 7 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Monday evening, at the Royal Society's hall. Mr. J. McEwan, vice president, was in the chair. After the formal business, Mr. Fenton gave a description of the use of "stops" in lenses and his remarks were supplemented by large scale diagrams on the blackboard, showing the influence which stops exert both in the case of parallel and convergent rays of light and also the different uses of them in single and compound lenses. This led up to an explanation of the method of constructing what are known as the "standard stops" of the Photographic Society of Great Britain, which have been recently introduced. This mode was clearly explained and is such as to enable any photographer who possesses a lens of which he obtains the focal length, to construct for himself diaphragms which will tell him what exposure of the sensitive plate is necessary for a subject with anyone of the series of stops, provided that he knows what exposure to give with any other stop. The matter is one of great interest to all photographers, as the correct exposure for any given subject is the very key note of the whole manipulation. It having been mentioned in one of the English photographic journals that New Zealand had beaten Australia in the formation of a photographic society (the Auckland Photographic Society having been established in November, 1883), it was decided to inform the editor of the paper in question that the Victorian Society was initiated at least four months previously. Before the conclusion of the meeting it was arranged to organize an excursion for several of the members during the ensuing holidays.



Wednesday 14th May 1884  Page 6 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Thursday 15th May 1884  Page 5 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held at the Royal Society's Hall on the 5th May, Mr. John McEwan, vice president, occupied the chair. After the ordinary business and the election of new members, a discussion ensued as to the desirability of procuring a first class optical lantern apparatus for the purpose of exhibiting the transparencies and negatives produced by members. The discussion ended in a decision to purchase the apparatus. It was also arranged to hold, on the first anniversary of the society in June, an exhibition of the work of members. This will include specimens in almost every branch of photography, as the large number of members now belonging to the association enables it to thoroughly develop many of the interesting specimens of the art. Some experiments with collodion plates brought the meeting to a close.



Friday 6th June 1884  Page 6 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Friday 6th June 1884  Page 5 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The first yearly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Monday evening last at the Royal Society's Hall. The proceedings were of a formal nature and were confined to the reading of reports by the Hon.Secretary and treasurer, the election of office bearers for the year 1884 - 85 and making arrangements for the forth coming exhibition. The retiring president (Dr Browning), the Vice Presidents (Messrs. J. McEwan and E.C. Bell), the treasurer (Mr. Fenton) and librarian (Mr. Taverner), were re-elected. Mr. J.H. Harvey, who, in the absence of the Hon.Secretary, has for several months performed his duties, was elected Hon.Secretary and the following gentlemen were elected members of committee: Messrs. E. Purton, H. Vanbeems, J. Levens, Rev. W. Bradley and W. Himen. Several gentlemen were nominated for membership and the committee received promises of various exhibits from those present for the exhibition, which is to be held on the 23rd June.



Tuesday 24th June 1884  Page 5 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Tuesday 24th June 1884  Page 5 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)
Saturday 28th June 1884  Page 27 - The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic.)
Saturday 28th June 1884  Page 28 - Leader (Melbourne, Vic.)

The first annual exhibition under the auspices of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held at the Royal Society's Hall yesterday evening. The exhibition included ordinary photographs, photo-mechanical prints of all kinds - these latter having been exhibited by Mr. Hart, of the Imperial Photographic Company - stereoscopic pictures, transparencies, colored photographs, Daguerrotypes, Talbot types and specimens of chrystoleum painting. Amongst the principal exhibitors were Mr. John Noon, Mr. J.W. Lindt, Mr. C. Nettleton, Mr. R.L.J. Ellery, Dr Browning, Mr. E. Le Plastrier, Mr. J.H. Harvey, Mr. James Musgrove, Mr. W. Hyman, Mr. Edgar E. Bell, Mr. E. Purton, Mr. J.G. Smellie, Mr. J.W. Fawcett, Mr. A.M. Atkin, Mr. P. Williams, Mr. John McEwan, Mr. E. Walker, Mr. E. Newman, Mr. C. Watts, Mr. J.J. Fenton and Mr. R.H. Taverner. In the photographic apparatus department Dr Browning was a large contributor; Mr. Kirkland, Mr. Musgrove, Mr. Bell, Mr. Burton, Mr. Newman and others also sent various photographic and stereoscopic appliances, some of their own design and manufacture. Messrs. J.W. Small and Co. and Mr. Marriage sent a splendid collection. There was a very large attendance, the exhibition proving more successful than its promoters had anticipated. In the course of the evening Dr Browning, the president of the society, delivered an address and Mr. Hart spoke on the rise and progress of photography, tracing its history from the commencement to the present time. There was an exhibition of transparencies in the optical lantern, these being the work of the members from their own negatives. The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was formed in June last year for the purpose of exchanging photographs between one amateur and another, the formation of a standard photographic library and the cultivation of a closer acquaintance with amateur photographers for their mutual benefit. Though formed so recently the association has now 43 names on its register. The meetings in general have been well attended; practical demonstrations in the working of the several processes in photography have been given from time to time and experiments conducted. A question box has been established, which, while filling up the times between the experiments, has been found of great advantage in comparing different methods and processes.



July 1894  Page 10 - THE PHOTOGRAPHIC REVIEW OF REVIEWS

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria at its last meeting discussed the relative merits of collodion and gelatine films, more particularly with regard to the making of cloud negatives and lantern slides.



Saturday 5th July 1884  Page 3 - Mercury and Weekly Courier (Victoria)

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
As we were unable to give our readers a full account of the proceedings in our last week's edition, we now have very much pleasure in giving, a verbatim report. The first annual exhibition in connection with the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, was opened in the Royal Society's Hall, Victoria Street, on Monday evening, June 23rd, in the presence of a large number of visitors. The walls of the building were profusely studded with portraits, executed, principally by amateur artists and which would compare very favorably with the productions of some of the professionals in the photographic business. The fact that the views were chiefly Victorian gave the exhibition an additional interest. Mr. Ludovico Hart and Dr Browning delivered instructive lectures on photography, showing its rise and progress.

Mr. J.H. Harvey, the indefatigable Hon.Secretary of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, worked with a will, and deserves, the highest eulogiums that may be paid to him, as it was only through his exertions that the Exhibition was such a decided success.

The following are the principal exhibitors:

Mr. Levens J.P., of Collingwood, showed "The Austin Hospital", "The Fernery and views of the Melbourne Botanical Gardens" and other original specimens, all of which are deserving of the highest praise, especially "The New Rotunda" and "The Lakes" (including swans), in the Melbourne Botanical Gardens, taken by the instantaneous process. All these views are really worthy of mention.

Rev. W. Bradley exhibited transparencies (portraits) of himself, wife and daughter; also the "Congregational Church, Oxford-street" and views of the various pieces of statuary in the Melbourne Botanical Gardens; including "Dorothea", "The Gladiator Defying the Lightning" etc.; also "The Bridge over the Yarra", leading to the Gardens and last, though not least, the renowned fat man of Hobart, Mr. Jennings, weighing 32 stone 7 lbs. All these pictures were excellent and showed that this gentlemen was almost proficient in the art of photography.

Messrs. J. McEwen, who had several frames, illustrating the celebrated "Omeo Track" and "Mount Feathertop".

E.C. Bell showed a stereoscopic camera, his own invention and several frames of photos produced in it.

E. Purton exhibited an improved camera for obtaining transparencies invented and made by himself and several pictures, also a view of Dunedin (panoramic) produced by a new method, the work of a new Zealand amateur.

Mr. Kirkland had a magnificent microscope and spectroscope, as well as a complete set of the "elementary bodies."

H. Vanheems showed a "Sutton's" panoramic camera and three prints of views taken with it.

Mr. Fawcett sent some excellent instantaneous views of yachts, steamers going at full speed, etc., taken by a special camera of his own construction.

Mr. Musgrove, of Greenvale, also showed some frames of work all taken on gelatine plates of his own make, as well as a revolving stand for exhibiting negatives and prints at the same time and mask printing. These pictures were very life-like and good.

Mr. Watts exhibited several large prints, some from gelatin plates, prepared by himself.

Mr. Himen showed some interesting photos of natives of Japan, the work having been executed by Japanese operators.

Mr. Newman showed a camera of his own make, which was a model of lightness.

Miss Thomson and Miss Burns exhibited some beautiful specimens of crystoleum painting.

Mr. J.W. Lindt whose name is well-known in connection with both portrait and landscape photography, sent a frame of views in the Ovens District, also a portable camera and stand containing all the latest improvements.

Mr. Ludovico Hart, late Superintendent of the Photo-mechanical Printing Department, of the N.S.W. Government and also formerly lecturer on photography at the Technical College, Sydney Association, Royal Society, Victoria, showed specimens of photo-mechanical printing of all descriptions, some of the productions exhibiting beautiful work, and were portions of an exhibit by him at the Melbourne International Exhibition, 1880. The work which can be produced by these processes is little known in this colony, and is worthy of finding a place in commercial photography.

Mr. Stubbs, proprietor of Bacheldor and Co.'s establishment, sent some fine specimens of portrait work.

Mr. C. Nettleton, exhibited several frames of colored photos, being views of different places of interest in the colony.

Mr. J. Noone, Government photographer, sent several magnificent reproductions of engravings, executed at the Crown Lands Photographic Establishment.

Dr Browning showed opaloid portraits, transparencies and several useful pieces of apparatus.

Mr. Ellery, Government Astronomer, lent various photographs of the moon and stars, taken in the great Melbourne telescope, which excited considerable interest.

Sergeant Fenton exhibited an album, still, and gun cotton (his own make), which were greatly admired.

The other principal exhibitors were - Messrs. Atkin, Walker, J.J. Fenton, J.H. Harvey, Saverner, and Smellie. The exhibitors of general chemicals, appliances, apparatus, etc., were the firms of J. W. Small and Co., and R. Marriage, each of whom sent a magnificent and complete collection.

The Exhibition terminated with a number of views, and photographs of Collingwood identities, shown in the optical lantern, Mr. Scales being the lantern operator.

The success of the Exhibition was mainly due to the exertions of Messrs. J.H. Harvey, M'Ewen, Paxton and Fenton, who worked with indefatigable zeal to make it successful and their efforts were rewarded beyond their most sanguine expectations.




Wednesday 9th July 1884  Page 99 - Illustrated Australian News (Melbourne, Vic.)

The first annual exhibition in connection with the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was opened in the Royal Society's Hall, Victoria-street, on June 23, in the presence of a large number of visitors. The walls of the building were profusely studded with portraits, executed principally by amateur artists and which would compare favorably with the productions of the leading professionals in the photography business. The fact that the views were chiefly Victorian gave the exhibition an additional interest.



Saturday 12th July 1884  Page 6 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Monday evening, at the Royal Society's hall; Mr. J McEwan, vice-president, occupied the chair. There was a huge attendance of members and several visitors. After the election of several new members and the nomination of others, Mr. Musgrove proceeded to demonstrate the processes of manufacturing sensitive gelatino-bromide and gelatino chloride emulsions and the coating of plates with them. He commenced at the operation of cleaning the plates, then proceeded to mix the various chemicals, gelatine, etc , which are used in the formation of the emulsion, the manner in which the silver bromide was formed by the decomposition of the ingredients being exceedingly interesting to witness; the emulsified gelatine was then precipitated with alcohol, which, while it extracts a great quantity of the surplus water which the gelatine has absorbed during melting, curtails the washing process which the compound has to undergo subsequently. After this the emulsion was re-melted and poured out to set. It was then cut up into small strips and placed in water to remove the superfluous soluble salts and afterwards melted again, filtered and spread on plates, which were then placed in the rack to dry, the process of packing the plates being shown. The manner of preparing gelatino chloride emulsion was then described and though none of the plates were of any use for exposing, in consequence of the whole of the operations having been performed by gaslight, which destroyed the sensitiveness of the compounds, yet the whole process was so clearly explained that its simplicity was patent to all who were present. Mr. Watts, another member who has been very successful in the manufacture of gelatine plates, also made a few remarks on his method of working and coated a large size plate. Both Mr. Musgrove and Mr. Watts exhibited negatives taken on plates of their own make and prints from the same. Altogether, the demonstration was a very successful one, the road for it having been paved by a paper on the process which was read by Mr. Pettigrew and the value of the information conveyed was such that the remarks of the experimenter were listened to for upwards of two hours.



Monday 14th July 1884  Page 7 - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW )

The last monthly report of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria is to hand. The report speaks of the success which attended the first anniversary celebration on the 23rd June and the names of several gentlemen formerly well known in Sydney are given as exhibitors at the exhibition of the association held on the same occasion. It may not be uninteresting to mention that the objects of this Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria are the exchange of photographs which are the work of amateurs, the interchange of ideas and suggestions relating to the advancement of photography, the formation and maintenance of a standard photographic library and the promotion of a closer acquaintance among amateur photographers in this and other colonies. Members include amateur photographers of either sex.



August 1894  Page 13 - THE PHOTOGRAPHIC REVIEW OF REVIEWS

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
Mr. Fenton read an interesting paper at the July meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria on “Stops and Exposures”, and illustrated his subject with exposure meters.



Friday 8th August 1884  Page 6 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Friday 8th August 1884  Page 3 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The ordinary monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held at the Royal Society's hall on Monday evening last. Two new members were elected and two gentlemen were nominated for membership. Mr. A.E. Walker was elected to fill a vacancy on the committee. A letter suggesting exchanges of prints, was read from the Hon.Secretary of the Amateur Photographic Society in Brisbane, which has been recently formed. Mr. Baker handed round a portrait printed on opal and promised to devote an evening to demonstrating the process of producing similar specimens. Mr. Bell then proceeded to photograph two of the members by the oxy-magnesium light having prepared the oxygen in the room. He also printed a transparency from the negative thus produced and subsequently exhibited it on the screen along with several others, by means of the optical lantern, which revealed the fact that the experiment had been a success. After this the meeting closed.



September 1894  Page 14 - THE PHOTOGRAPHIC REVIEW OF REVIEWS

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
The August meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was made attractive by a display of lantern slides, a large number of which were put through, and subjected to keen criticism. Messrs. Thompson, Ward, Kernot, Cooke, Madden, Ward, and others contributed slides of much interest and great technical merit, and the meeting was most pleasant although the weather outside was execrable.



Friday 5th September 1884  Page 7 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Saturday 6th September 1884  Page 15 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Monday evening last, at the Royal Society's Hall. There was a good attendance of members and a few visitors. After the election of new members and the nomination of two other gentlemen, it was agreed to collect a small series of prints from members for the purpose of exchange with the Brisbane Amateur Photographic Association and New Zealand Amateur Photographic Association. Mr. Baker then proceeded to explain in a practical way the method of using Warnerke's sensitometer, by exposing the gelatine plates of several well-known makers under it and then developing them, the difference in sensitiveness between some of the makes of commercial plates being very marked. He afterwards printed some portraits and landscapes from the negatives of members, the printing being done on opal plates prepared by himself, which on development presented very beautiful results. These plates show to the best advantage in portrait work, but in cases of landscape work, in which the details were large and well pronounced, the effect was very fine. Taken altogether, the demonstration was one of the best of its class which has been given before the members and a large amount of information was gained. A vote of thanks to Mr. Baker brought the proceedings to a close.



WARNERKE'S STANDARED SENSITOMETER 1880


Consists of a printing frame, density plate with 25 squares of varying density, phosphorescent tablet and holders for magnesium ribbon. Quarter-plate size.

This is the earliest commercial sensitometer preceding the work of Hurter and Driffield. The standard light source is a phosphorescent tablet that has been exposed to burning magnesium ribbon. The plate to be measured is placed behind the graduated density plate in the printing frame and exposed for a fixed time to the phosphorescent tablet. The rapidity of the plate can be gauged by seeing which of the graduated squares is visible. This instrument was widely used and several manufacturers labeled their plates with Warnerke numbers. The value measured was the threshold value of the plate. Each Warnerke number represented a 1/3 increase in speed over the previous. The price was 15/-.



October 1894  Page 12 - THE PHOTOGRAPHIC REVIEW OF REVIEWS

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
The general meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held at the Royal Society’s rooms on Wednesday, 10th October. Mr. E.C. Bell presided over a good attendance of members. Dr. Nelly and Messrs. Holtz, Wallis, Miscamble, Wood, Killen, Fox, H.P Bennett and A.E. Bennett were elected members. A letter from the Gordon College Photo. Association drew attention to the Photographic Congress which is to be held in Geelong next year, and it was agreed that, in order to give members an opportunity of considering the matter, it should be postponed till the next meeting. Mr. C. Watts exhibited a negative which had been taken in a panoramic camera of his own construction. He also showed a print from the negative, both photographs being very satisfactory, and in the course of conversation he intimated that he would exhibit and describe the camera at the next meeting. Mr. Trowbridge showed a specimen of work done on Baker’s printing-out opal plates. The Secretary gave a short account of the amateur work shown at the exhibition recently held in Sydney, under the management of the New South Wales Railway Institute, and gave members a general idea of the progress of amateur photographers in the adjacent colonies, and of the position held by their work as far as could be judged by the exhibits. Samples of Fuller’s printing-out plates and lantern plates, as well as of Austral “Star” paper, were distributed among members, after which the meeting closed.



Saturday 8th November 1884  Page 10 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Friday 14th November 1884  Page 7 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The general monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held at the Royal Society's Hall, Victoria-street, on Monday evening last. Mr. Starkey was elected a member of the association. Mr. Hoogklimmer laid on the table a number of prints of scenery photographed in various parts of the colony. Subsequently, a number of transparencies were exhibited in the new optical lantern apparatus recently imported by the association, which, when worked to the full extent of its powers, is one of the finest in the southern hemisphere. A large number of transparencies were shown, including wet plates, gelatine bromide plates and Woodbury types, the latter specimens being, of course, produced by English professionals. The lanterns worked exceedingly well and at the close of the exhibition the thanks of the members, of whom there was a large number present, were given to Mr. Purton, who not only fitted up the lanterns gratuitously, but superintended the exhibition in an able manner all through. It was decided to hold an excursion of members for photographing on the 10th November.



Tuesday 2nd December 1884  Page 6 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Monday evening, at the Royal Society's Hall. Mr. J. McEwan occupied the chair. Messrs R. Heath and G.W. Small were elected members and Mr. W. Andrews nominated for membership. Mr. Musgrove laid on the table a few prints received from Mr. W. Woodbury, of London, these having been produced by the "Stanno-type" process, which is one of the latest inventions of Mr. Woodbury and a simplification of the original Woodbury-type process. The prints were greatly admired.



               

WALTER BENTLEY WOODBURY

Born 26th June 1834 Manchester, England
Died 5th September 1885 Margate, England


WOODBURYTYPE
The Woodbury type process was developed by Walter Bentley Woodbury (b.1834, d.1885) based on a series of patents from 1864. The process sits between being photographic and photo-mechanical; it can be thought of as producing carbon prints mechanically, on an industrial scale. It is a continuous-tone process, no screen or ground is used.

A relief image, from a photographic negative, was produced in bichromated gelatine, this was placed in contact with a lead block and subjected to considerable pressure in an hydraulic press. The result was a lead mould varying in depth in proportion to the tonal areas of the original subject. Pigmented gelatin was placed in the mould and transferred to paper using a press. The Woodburytype produced a continuous tone image consisting of varying depths of gelatine, as no screen or ground was required the result was indistinguishable from a carbon print. The gelatine relief could be re-used to produce further lead moulds.

Woodburytypes were normally printed on thick paper or card, they could be produced in any color but most often they were in a sepia tone that resembled a photograph, an extra coating of gelatine or similar was often applied to the finished print. Due to the pressure needed to create the mould the images tended to be small. Woodburytypes were most suitable for high-quality reproductions and were typically used for book illustrations, cartes de visite and also lantern slides. By the 1890s its use in book illustration was declining as processes such as photogravure proved more economic.

STANNOTYPE
Woodbury introduced a related process called Stannotype. In this process the gelatine relief is not pressed into a lead block to produce the mould, thus the need for an hydraulic press was removed. The process starts with a positive transparency, from that a gelatine relief negative was produced, that was coated with a thin layer of india-rubber varnish. Tinfoil was laid over the gelatine relief and passed through a pair of rollers that pressed the tinfoil into the gelatine relief to produce the printing mould. Printing from the mould was the same as in the Woodburytype.



2nd EXHIBITION c.1885
AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA




Thursday 8th January 1885  Page 9 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The general monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Monday evening at the Royal Society's hall in the temporary absence of the president the chair was occupied by Mr. J. McEwan, vice president. Mr. W. Andrews was elected a member. The remainder of the ordinary business having been completed, the president (Dr Browning) read a paper on chrystoleum painting, his remarks being listened to with great interest. The information given was of a sound and practical nature and conveyed in as few words as possible, the value of the whole being considerably enhanced by the exhibition of chrystoleums in various stages from the mounting of the paints on the glass through the reducing, oiling and coloring processes, terminating with the final framing. A number of questions were asked and answered, after which the meeting terminated.



CHRYSTOLEUM PAINTING
The crystoleum was a modern application of an ancient technique where color was applied behind a print or lithograph which had been rendered transparent with wax or varnish. In the case of the crystoleum, also known as a chromo-photograph, an albumen print was pasted face down to the inside curve of a piece of concave glass. Flat glass was not so suitable. The paper backing of the photograph was then carefully removed with sandpaper until only the emulsion was left adhering to the back of the glass. The photograph was then rendered transparent with a slow-drying oil or wax and the image was ready for the first application of color. The intricate detail of the photograph, such as jewelery, lips and eyes, was then colored with a fine brush. When this was finished a second, matching curved glass was placed behind the first with spacers to keep it close to, but not touching, the photograph which had just been colored. The two glasses were then bound together at the edge. The broad areas of color were then applied to the back of the second glass, no detail being required as this was on the photograph itself which was now safely sandwiched between the two pieces of glass. Portions of the broad areas of color could be removed and reapplied until the right effect was achieved and when the artist was satisfied white card could be attached to the back of the second glass and the whole assembly mounted in a frame. The materials for crystoleum painting were a commercial item and available until around 1915.



Monday 9th March 1885  Page 6 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Monday last, at the Royal Society's Hall. Mr. J. McEwan, vice-president, took the chair. There was a good attendance. Dr. Brett and Mr. E. Keep, were elected members. Some prints illustrating Gipps Land scenery, the work of Mr. Jones, of Maffra, were laid on the table and an exhibition of transparencies in the lantern was given. Slides produced by Dr Browning and Messre. Bell, Williams, Pettigiew, Andrews, Hoogklimmer, Fenton, Walker and Harvey, were shown, as well as a number taken on wet plates, which were sent for exhibition by a non member. The plates shown by the members comprised, wet collodion, gelatino chloride and gelatino bromide and the majority were well executed, those produced by the "wet process" being specially admired. At the conclusion, a vote of thanks was given to Mr. Burton, in recognition of the work which he had performed in connexion with the management of the lanterns.



Saturday 4th April 1885  Page 5 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on the 30th, Mr. E.C. Bell, vice president, in the chair. Messrs. T.S. Small, H. Grace and W. Badham were elected members. Mr. J.J. Fenton gave a demonstration of the "carbon printing process", after which Dr. Browning, Sergeant Fenton and Messrs. Bell, Pettigrew and Musgrove related experiences. Notice of motion was given to alter the night of meeting to a more suitable one.



Friday 8th May 1885  Page 5 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)
Saturday 9th May 1885  Page 28 - Leader (Melbourne, Vic.)

The general monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Monday evening at the Royal Society's hall. Mr. J. M'Ewan occupied the chair. Mr. A.T. Danks gave an interesting account of his recent trip round the world, describing the various places of interest which he had visited and showing numerous photographs in illustration of his remarks; some of these, which depicted the scenery in the neighborhood of the latest European engineering triumph — the St.Gothard Tunnel — were the object of special attention. Mr. Bell subsequently developed several transparencies taken on gelatino-chloride and citro-chloride plates, showing the different tones they are capable of taking under various methods of treatment.



Thursday 4th June 1885  Page 5 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Thursday 4th June 1885  Page 5 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Monday evening at the Royal Society's Hall. Mr. E.C. Bell occupied the chair. Messrs Kernot, Thompson and Edelsten were elected members. Mr. Musgrove suggested that a transparency club should be formed in connexion with the association and the transparencies produced should be circulated amongst the members for exhibition at their respective homes. The suggestion met with general approval. The Hon.Secretary developed some collodion transparencies and these, with a number of others, produced by Messrs. Bell, Musgrove, Trowbridge, Levens and Andrews were displayed on the wall by means of the optical lantern.



Saturday 20th June 1885  Page 9 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The second annual exhibition of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria will be held on Friday and Saturday, June 26 and 27, in the Congregational hall, Russell street. The exhibits will be selected from the work of members of the association during the past year and will include specimens of photographic art in almost every department.


SECOND ANNUAL EXHIBITION - JUNE 1885




Saturday 27th June 1885  Page 5 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

An exhibition by the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was opened yesterday evening at the hall belonging to the Independent Church in Russell street, but the title is somewhat misleading, for the works of amateurs compose a portion only of the display, to which professional photographers and dealers in photographic materials have largely contributed. Several photogravures from the establishment of Goupil and Co., in Paris and numerous photographs of the architectural antiquities of Rome and of the master pieces of Greek sculpture in the famous collections of the Vatican and the Capitol, are also among the attractive features of the exhibition. Mr. Lindt likewise shows some excellent portraits and interiors, but these are certainly not the work of amateurs. Unfortunately, the artificial light projected on the walls from a couple of circular gas-lights in the roof is far too feeble to admit of such a critical examination of the numerous photographs exhibited as would enable us to speak with anything like confidence of their positive or comparative merits. The best under such circumstances, is scarcely distinguishable from the worst. Now, a sun picture, being the creation of a powerful light, requires to be scrutinized by the light of day. Otherwise the delicacies of its detail, its tone, its gradations, its perspective, the strength of some portions of the picture and the softness of others, elude observation. And this was the case last night. So far as we could judge, the productions of Mr. J. McEwan, Mr. E. Purton, Mr. C.W. Watts and Mr. E. Newman appeared to be the most commendable; some of them regarded as a whole and others when considered as picked specimens. But it is not at all improbable that an inspection of these photographs in the day time might lead to a modification of this opinion. The other exhibitors who are amateurs comprise Messrs Hoogklimner, Heath and Hughes, J.H. Harvey, E.A. Walker, W. Andrews, E. Bell, H.J. Trowbridge, J. Musgrove and the Amateur Photographic Association of Wellington, New Zealand. There was a large attendance of visitors during the evening, who appeared to be very much gratified with the display and the exhibition will be reopened this evening.



Saturday 27th June 1885  Page 9 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The second annual exhibition of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was thrown open to the public last evening at the lecture hall. Russell-street, adjoining the Collins-street Independent Church. The room is unfortunately so badly lighted that it is difficult to distinguish good work from bad but as far as we could judge, the show is much superior to that of last year. Mr. M'Ewan exhibits a large number of views of fair quality and Mr. Musgrove some photographs of Victorian scenery, very cleanly manipulated and which show a laudable effort in the direction of artistic effect. A little picture, by Ager M. Atkins, called "Have you any Bottles to Sell?" is neat and clever and the views by Mr. Newman are soft and pleasing. The Amateur Association of Wellington, New Zealand, exhibit a number of interesting views, not, however, of much merit from a photographic point of view ; Mr. Hoogklimmer some views of South Australian and Victorian scenery, cleverly handled and Mr. Putron some bits, mostly by the rapid process, the most artistic being a coast scene — a misty effect, with distant headland, rocky foreground, with figure and stretch of sea. On the whole, the art element is not a prominent feature in the exhibition, at any rate as far as the amateur exhibits are concerned and the visitors who examines these productions only might be disposed to agree with the old mot of Punch that photography was joe to graphic art. He has only to look around, however, to the beautiful photogravures by Goupil and the masterly portraits by Lindt and other of our local artists, which have been lent for the adornment of the room, to see how imperfectly the possibilities of the art were guessed at but a few years ago. A large quantity of material, in the shape of cameras, lenses, dry plates, stereoscopes and slides and other appurtenances of the black art, are shown on tables set out in the center of the room.



Monday 29th June 1885  Page 5 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The annual exhibition of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, which was opened on Friday, continued on Saturday evening at the Independent-hall, Russell street. There was a numerous attendance.



Thursday 9th July 1885  Page 5 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Thursday 9th July 1885  Page 5 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held in the Royal Society's hall on Tuesday night. Mr. John McEwan presided and there was a large attendance of members and visitors. Mr. Harvey, the Hon.Secretary, gave an interesting sketch of a recent trip through the fern glens and mountains of Marysville and Fernshaw, in which he was accompanied by several members of the society. Some views of the exquisite scenery to be found in those districts were shown, in the form of transparencies, under the direction of Mr. Purton. Amongst the visitors was Mr. James Thomson, Hon.Secretary to the Colonial and Indian Exhibition Commission and at the request of the meeting, he explained the objects of that undertaking. He suggested that the society should make a strong effort to form a good collection of picturesque views and also of transparencies, as both would be calculated to extend a knowledge of the beautiful scenery of Victoria and of the wonderful advance of Melbourne and other centers of population. A cordial vote of thanks was passed to Mr. Thomson for his attendance and the committee promised to take the matter into early consideration.



Friday 24th July 1885  Page 10 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The annual meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on July 21. After the adoption of the report and balance sheet for the year 1884-85 the election of office bearers for the coming year was proceeded with: Dr Browning, President; Messrs J. McEwan and E.C. Bell, Vice Presidents; Mr. J.H. Harvey, Hon.Secretary; Mr. J.J. Fenton, Hon.Treasurer and Mr. E. Purton, custodian of apparatus, were reelected without opposition. Mr. E.A. Walker was elected librarian and Messrs. Levens, Himen, Hoogklimmer, Hughes and Williams, members of committee.



Friday 14th August 1885  Page 7 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Saturday 15th August 1885  Page 13 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Tuesday evening at the Royal Society's Hall. The president (Dr Browning) was in the chair. Messrs. Levien, Barrett, Mulvany, Smith, Huggins and Ardern of Melbourne, Mr. J.C. Leslie of Corowa and Messrs. Williams and Keyworth, of New Zealand were elected members. A letter was read from Mr. Musgrove announcing the receipt of the necessary apparatus for photo-mechanical printing by means of the Stannotype process and asking members to send negatives to him for reproduction. A number of photographs received from the Queensland Photographic Association and the Philadelphia Amateur Photographic Club, were laid upon the table and greatly admired. The prints included some very fine specimens of instantaneous work. It was decided that they should be mounted in the albums of the association. The president gave a short description of the manipulatory portion of the wet collodion process and subsequently obtained by its means a transparency in the camera from a wet plate negative and also a negative from a wet plate transparency, thus showing the whole process of producing the negative and positive. The originals were illuminated by means of the sciopticon and the demonstration was intended mainly to illustrate the process to those members who, having taken up photography since the advent of gelatine plates know nothing of collodion, except by hearsay. After a number of questions had been asked and satisfactorily answered, the meeting closed.



Thursday 10th September 1885  Page 6 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The general monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Tuesday evening, at the Royal Society's Hall. Mr. E.C. Bell, vice president, was in the chair. Messrs. Norris, Madden, Lang and Mallet were elected members. Several photographs, forming the balance of a number received from the Amateur Photographic Association of Wellington, New Zealand, were placed on the table, some of them being of a high degree of merit, both in a technical and artistic sense. Mr. Lang showed a few portraits and views printed in platinum. Subsequently, the Hon.Secretary demonstrated a method of preparing lantern transparencies on dry collodion plates. A plate was coated, sensitized in the silver bath, washed, coated with a preservative and exposed under a negative to the light of the sciopticon; the picture was then developed and the resulting transparency was exceedingly clear and of a rich warm tone. Several other slides, produced in the same manner, were passed through the lantern, in order to show the range of tones obtainable by this method. A slide printed in carbon was shown by Mr. Musgrove. It was decided that an outdoor meeting should be held towards the end of the present month.



Saturday 17th October 1885  Page 12 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The ordinary monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Tuesday evening last at the Royal Society's hall. Mr. J. McEwan, vice-president, occupied the chair. Mr. Lang read a short paper on the platino-type process of permanent printing, which was illustrated by several experiments. Sergeant Fenton contributed a paper on collodion emulsion and explained the various methods of compounding it. At the close of the meeting, a photograph of the second annual exhibition of the association was presented to each member in the room the prints being from a negative by the Hon.Secretary, Mr. J.H. Harvey.



Monday 16th November 1885  Page 6 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The general monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Tuesday evening, at the Royal Society's Hall. Mr. E.C. Bell, vice president, occupied the chair. The preliminary business having been settled, Mr. Rankin was elected a member and Mr. Tough was nominated for membership. Mr. Bell read a paper on "Photographic lenses", describing the construction and peculiarities of each of the lenses in general use. The paper was illustrated by diagrams, drawn to a large scale. Mr. Madden described an interesting method of producing colored lantern slides by simple means and made one or two slides in illustration of it. Several slides were passed through the lantern, to illustrate Messrs. Bell and Madden's remarks; and the meeting was brought to a close by the exhibition of some photo-micrographs in the lantern, these slides being the work of Mr. J.B. Kirkland.



Friday 4th December 1885  Page 5 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

THE COLONIAL AND INDIAN EXHIBITION
The President and Commissioners of the Victorian Branch of the Colonial and Indian Exhibition, who have for some time been engaged in preparing specimens of Australian products and manufactures for the forthcoming exhibition in London, yesterday invited a number of friends to inspect the exhibits prior to their shipment to England. The Exhibition building was selected as most suitable for the arrangement of the specimens and the visitors assembled towards noon to receive his Excellency, Sir Henry Loch, who had been asked to inspect the exhibits prior to their shipment. His Excellency Sir Henry Loch and Lady Elizabeth Loch on arrival were received by Mr. Joseph Bosisto, M.L.A. and the other members of the royal commission and after proceeding up the nave of the building, Mr. David Lee playing a voluntary on the organ meanwhile, were afforded a view of such limited display as the short time afforded allowed to be shown, the collection being merely a representative one and but a fraction of what will be exhibited in London. The pictures, arranged by Mr. Alexander Fletcher, were inspected with particular interest as showing the distinct development of Victorian art.


LADY ELIZABETH LOCH (nee Villiers)

Born 1841 - Died 1938



After the party had inspected the exhibits, Mr. Bosisto proposed the toast of Her Majesty the Queen, which was received with cheers. His Excellency the Governor and Lady Loch were also cheered in connection with the same toast.

Sir Henry Lock, in reply, said that although Mr. Bosisto had remarked that there would be only one toast - that of Her Majesty the Queen - he was sure those present would agree with him that before separating they should drink Prosperity and Success to the Exhibition in London and with that toast he could not but couple the name of the chairman, Mr. Bosisto. He felt that on such an occasion it would be improper for the company to separate without drinking the toast. He had therefore the greatest pleasure in proposing it and in doing so he felt sure that all who had seen examples of what would in a few months be exhibited in London were satisfied that the colony of Victoria would be well and ably represented and he was sure that exhibitions of such a character, showing what the colony was able to do, would be of great advantage and would redound to the credit and honor of Victoria to an extent which they would perhaps he scarcely able to realize at once. That success was due in great measure to the liberality shown by the Parliament of Victoria. Without further remarks he would propose the health of Mr. Bosisto and the gentlemen working with him on the commission and Success to the Exhibition.

Mr. Bosisto, in reply, said that in proposing the toast of The Queen, the committee had decided amongst themselves that they would grant each other absolution, so as not to deliver any addresses during the afternoon. He was therefore somewhat taken aback by the toast proposed by His Excellency, but he had nevertheless acknowledged it on behalf of the commission, who had worked assiduously, attentively and industriously. And he thanked his Excellency on behalf of the exhibitors, for if ever he felt proud in his life of being a Victorian it was at the present moment. The commissioners had only to go amongst the manufacturers and producers and say what was required and expected of Victorians by H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, to be at once received with smiles and they were told that whatever the manufacturers possessed would be placed at the disposal of the commissioners, so well had the producers responded to the call of the commissioners that he was sure Victoria would gain a position in the forthcoming exhibition which would make them all proud of their country. It was but right that they should thank the Parliament for endeavoring to promote the exhibition and the whole colony, in fact, had done its duty in a most magnificent manner. The commissioners had done their best for the people of the colony and to show the people at home that they were rather in the foreground than behind any of the other colonies and possessed that zeal and perseverance which were the elements of a great nation.

The exhibits, though numerous and interesting, were merely a sample of what the contents of the Victorian court will be when shown to the public: the estimated number of the objects being 10,000, contributed by 500 exhibitors. Those shown yesterday comprised the timber exhibits of the Technological Museum; exhibits of timbers prepared in various useful forms and rare plants in albums, by Baron F. Von Mueller, Government botanist a specimen of pure merino sheep, from Mr. Philip Russell's Carngham stud flock; fibres and carpological specimens, collected by Mr. W.R. Guilfoyle, F.L.S.; a large collection of specimens of Australian natural history, formed by Professor M'Coy; a collection of eucalyptus and other preparations from the indigenous vegetation of Australia, contributed by Mr. Joseph Bosisto; collections of articles made by the aborigines of Victoria and the productions of the Victorian School for the Blind; beautifully fashioned pottery ware, by the Bendigo Pottery Company; work performed under the direction of the Penal department of Victoria; saddlery and harness; tweeds and shawls; blankets and flannels; furs and fur goods; rich gold specimens from the Fryerstown and several Sandhurst mines; specimens of gold-bearing quartz; steel and copper engraving, stereotypes and printing and bookbinding; collective exhibits of Victorian wool are shown by Messrs. R. Goldsbrough and Co. Limited; a large trophy of woodware, designed to show the utilitarian character of Australian timbers, by Mr. John Perry; five cases of Australian moths, butterflies, by Dr. Lucas; five cases of Australian beetles, butterflies and other insects, by Mr. C. French; model of a quarantine station, by Mr. Porter, exhibited by the Central Board of Health; and models of gold cakes, as turned out of retorts - facsimiles of actual yields from Sandhurst companies - exhibited by the Sandhurst city council; leather of various kinds, shown by Mr. J.B. Hayman; and specimens of manufactured saddlery, boots and shoes and similar products will form an important item in the catalog. The department of most general interest will, however, be the fine art gallery, which, amongst other important works, will contain three charming specimens from the easel of Mr. J.F. Patterson and exhibited yesterday, one in particular, a sunset view on the Yarra, below the Falls-bridge, being a work of first class merit; another, named Evening, by the same artist, hardly inferior. Mr. Mather sends a charming silvery waterfall, Mr. H.J. Johnstone contributes a meritorious view on the Murray and Messrs. Buvelot, Eugene von Guerrard, Tom Roberts, G.R. Ashton, Chevalier, Van den Houten, Rolandi and others assist in providing a very creditable show of Victorian art. Some of Miss Vale's work, depicting native woods, is singularly truthful and meritorious. The architectural elevations include a photograph showing the new buildings now in course of construction for the English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank, the only specimen of pure domestic Gothic architecture in the city and a view in prospective of the very pleasing and clever front of the Premier Permanent Land and Investment Association's premises about to be commenced. There is a strong show of photographs, contributed by the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria and Messrs. J.W. Lindt, Johnstone, O'Shannessy and Co. Limited, Foster and Martin, Stewart and Co., M'Donald of St Kilda and others. Madame Monchette and her pupils send some very interesting subjects painted on ribbed canvas hardly to be distinguished from tapestry except upon close inspection.



       

HENRY BROUGHAM LOCH, 1st Baron Loch

Born 23rd May 1827
Died 20th June 1900 London, England


GOVERNOR OF VICTORIA 1884 to 1889




Thursday 10th December 1885  Page 7 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Thursday 10th December 1885  Page 5 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

This evening the Victorian commissioners of the Colonial and Indian Exhibition will visit the Royal Society a hall in order to inspect the photographs and photo-trans parencies of Australian scenery which have been prepared by the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria for the exhibition. The exhibits include views of a great variety of characteristic Australian scenery and subjects and the commissioners intend that the display of transparencies by a powerful optical limelight shall be one of the chief attractions of the Victorian court at night



Tuesday 15th December 1885  Page 5 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Saturday 19th December 1885  Page 14 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, was held on December 8, at the Royal Society's Hall, Mr. J. McEwan in the chair. Mr. Tough was elected a member and Mr. Blake nominated for membership. Mr. Purton exhibited Chadwick's oxygen generator and explained the method of using it, the apparatus was subsequently utilised in the preparation of oxygen required for the exhibition of the transparencies. Mr. Newman then read a description of an extended tour over the central and eastern portions of the colony, embracing the Black Spur, Lorne, Gippsland, Colac, Ballarat, Blackwood and Sunbury. The paper was illustrated by transparencies, which had been prepared by Mr. Williams. On Thursday evening the lantern slides which are to be sent to the Colonial and Indian Exhibition were shown, the members of the association with their friends and several of the Exhibition Commissioners being present. About 120 views, illustrating the scenery and industrial progress of the colony, were passed through the lantern and from these will be selected a set to send to London where they will be shown by means of a powerful optical lantern, thus bringing the scenery, into greater prominence than can be done by the ordinary sized silver prints. Mr. Bosisto, on behalf of the commission, thanked the association for the exhibit and the proceedings then terminated.



Friday 12th March 1886  Page 7 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Tuesday evening, at the Royal Society's hall, Mr. E.C. Bell, vice-president, occupied the chair. Messrs. Lockhart, Knipe and Cooke were elected members and Messrs. Rendall, Stewart and Barius, nominated for membership. A letter was read from the Queensland Photographic Association and Mr. Mulvany placed on the table several prints to be forwarded to that society in exchange for others received from them. A number of prints produced by Mr. Wood, an English amateur, were likewise shown. A vote of thanks was passed to Mr. Purton, the custodian, in recognition of his great services to the association. Mr. Flegeltaub subsequently demonstrated the processes of direct printing on gelatino-bromide and gelatino-chloride papers, by contact, also the method of enlargement on the former. The printing was all performed by gas-light and the enlargement by means of the lantern. The demonstration was a complete success, particularly the enlarging. The thanks of the meeting having been tendered to Mr. Flegeltaub, the proceedings were brought to a close.



Tuesday 18th May 1886  Page 10 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Thursday 20th May 1886  Page 6 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on 11th May, at the Royal Society's hall. Mr. J. McEwan presided. Owing to the inclement weather the attendance was small. After the usual routine business it was announced that the next annual exhibition would be held early in July. A short description of a tour round the Western district was then read and illustrated by lantern slides produced by Mr. Bell and the Hon.Secretary. The Moorabool Valley, Camperdown, Panmure Warrnambool and Hamilton districts were described and transparencies of some of the principal sights and places of interest in each were shown. Subsequently a number of slides of instantaneous street views in the city by Mr. Bell were passed through the lantern, followed by a few by Mr. Lang. Mr. Trowbridge also showed several effective bits of Tasmanian scenery.



Friday 18th June 1886  Page 7 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Saturday 19th June 1886  Page 15 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The ordinary monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Tuesday evening at the Royal Society's hall. Mr. F.C. Bell, vice president, took the chair. Correspondence from the Queensland Photographic Association and the Amateur Photographic Association of New South Wales, was read. It was decided to ask such members as could spare prints, after the closing of the next annual exhibition, to forward a few to be exhibited at the conversazione of the New South Wales Association. Mr. Aikenhead, a Tasmanian amateur, laid on the table a fine set of Tasmanian views, which were highly praised. The Hon.Secretary then gave a demonstration of the carbon printing process, commencing with a short description of the principles upon which it is based and, subsequently, two prints which had been exposed under negatives during the day, were attached to opal glass and developed in the room. The experiment was very successful and the working of this simple and beautiful process of permanent printing, as well as the results produced, were much admired. After the usual conversation on the business of the evening, the meeting closed.



Saturday 17th July 1886  Page 9 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The third annual exhibition in connexion with the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, which now has a roll of about 100 members, was opened in the Royal Society's Hall yesterday evening. There is a capital collection of exhibits, representing all the different processes of the art of photography. In previous years some professional work has been admitted, but this year the exhibition is confined to that of amateurs. Almost the whole of the work shown is new. It is not all equally good. A large portion of it is above the average and the best of it would do credit to the studio of a professional photographer. All the latest improvements appear to have been studied with a fair measure of success and it is evident that the association is serving a useful purpose. In addition to the ordinary exhibits, there are some interesting specimens of platinotype, crystoleum and stereoscopic work. The exhibition was open yesterday evening only to members and their friends. The rooms were crowded and much interest was manifested in a lantern entertainment which took place during the evening. A selection of photographs chiefly landscapes, was thrown on the canvas and reproduced with excellent effect. The entertainment was conducted by Mr. J.H. Harvey, who is acting as scientific custodian. This evening the exhibition will be open to the public free of charge.



Tuesday 20th July 1886  Page 7 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The third annual exhibition of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was continued on Saturday evening, at the Royal Society's Hall, a large number of visitors being present. The tables containing stereoscopes were, as usual at the exhibitions of the association, centres of special attraction. Mr. Bell's table contained stereoscopic views printed in silver, whilst Mr. Musgrove showed the magnificent results obtainable in the stereoscope by using glass transparencies in place of the ordinary prints. These were prepared on plates coated with gelatino-chloride of silver emulsion, both the negative and transparency plates having been made by Mr. Musgrove. On this table was also shown a series of lantern slides on gelatino-chloride plates by the same gentleman, each plate being of a different color, the tones varying from black and chocolate to brick red, these effects having been obtained simply by modifying the development. Of the prints on the walls, the ordinary silver-printing process was well represented and there were in addition some excellent specimens of platinum, carbon and gelatino-chloride of silver paper, many of the prints being enameled. Some of the platinotype prints by Mr. Lang had more the appearance of Indian ink drawings than of photographs. There were some fine views of Tasmanian scenery by Mr. Trowbridge and some composition character photographs by Mr. Atkin. A set of architectural views, the work of the Hon.Secretary, Mr. J.H. Harvey, illustrating the great hall, Legislative Council and Assembly Chambers and the library, Houses of Parliament, Melbourne, was much admired, as was also a frame of views by Mr. Newman. A number of Queensland and New Zealand views sent by the Queensland Amateur Photographic Society and Wellington Amateur Photographic Society, occupied a portion of the north end of the room and formed special objects of interest. In the large hall upstairs, the optical lanterns of the association were located and at intervals during the evening transparencies of colonial scenery executed by the members were shown on the wall by the aid of the lime light, manipulated by the Hon.Secretary. These included the slides which were awarded prizes in the competitions a few days ago, Mr. Bell having obtained first place, whilst Messrs. Musgrove and Trowbridge tied for second. Amongst the apparatus shown by Messrs. J.W. Small and Co, Mr. Flegeltaub and Messrs Stewart and Co., were several novelties, one of the most notable being a changing and developing tent on the table of Messrs. Small. This tent, when closed, occupied no more room than an umbrella and looked not unlike one. Yet, on opening it, there was ample room inside to change the largest plates in daylight, without danger of light reaching them. Messrs. Stewart showed some French and American cameras and Mr. Flegeltaub, amongst other things, exhibited a Kershaw's shutter with pneumatic release. Mr. Ardern showed some excellent cameras manufactured by himself, also various other appliances, the whole conveying a very good impression of the progress made in photographic cabinetwork in the colony. Altogether, the exhibition may be considered the most successful held by the association, especially as the whole of the photographic work was executed by the amateur members and in connexion with the show. Mr. E.A. Walker is deserving of great praise for the manner in which he supervised the hanging and arranging of the exhibits.



Saturday 24th July 1886  Page 28 - The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic.)

The third annual exhibition of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was continued on Saturday evening, at the Royal Society's Hall, a large number of visitors being present. The tables containing stereoscopes were, as usual at the exhibitions of the association, centers of special attraction. Mr. Bell's table contained stereoscopic views printed in silver, whilst Mr. Musgrove showed the magnificent results obtainable in the stereoscope by using glass transparencies in place of the ordinary prints. These were prepared on plates coated with gelatino-chlorid of silver emulsion, both the negative and transparency plates having been made by Mr. Musgrove. On this table was also shown a series of lantern slides on gelatino-chloride plates by the same gentleman, each plate being of a different color, the tones varying from black and chocolate to brick red, these effects having been obtained simply by modifying the development. Of the prints on the walls, the ordinary silver-printing process was well represented and there were in addition some excellent specimens of platinum, carbon and gelatino chloride of silver paper, many of the prints being enamelled. Some of the platinotype prints by Mr. Lang had more the appearance of Indian ink drawings than of photographs. There were some fine views of Tasmanian scenery by Mr. Trowbridge and some composition character photographs by Mr. Atkin. A set of architectural views, the work of the Hon.Secretary, Mr. J.H. Harvey, illustrating the great hall, Legislative Council and Assembly Chambers and the library, Houses of Parliament, Melbourne, was much admired, as was also a frame of views by Mr. Newman. A number of Queensland and New Zealand views sent by the Queensland Amateur Photographic Society and Wellington Amateur Photographic Society, occupied a portion of the north end of the room and formed special objects of interest in the large hall upstairs, the optical lanterns of the association were located and at intervals during the evening transparencies of colonial scenery executed by the members were shown on the wall by the aid of the limelight manipulated by the Hon.Secretary. These included the slides which were awarded prizes in the competitions a few days ago, Mr. Bell having obtained first place, whilst Messrs. Musgrove and Trowbridge tied for second.



Saturday 14th August 1886  Page 12 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Saturday 14th August 1886  Page 11 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Tuesday evening at the Royal Society's Hall. Mr. E.C. Bell presided. The following new members were elected: Miss Cooper, Dr. Clendinnen, Messrs C. Ward, D.C. Carr, Geo Williams, R.W. Harvie, C.J. Bird, W.H. Newman, H. Grieve and Geo. Fullarton and several gentlemen were nominated for membership. Mr. Flegeltaub gave an interesting demonstration of the method of printing by gaslight and the development of gelatino-chloride paper. Several members brought negatives to be printed from and about 30 prints of all sizes were produced and developed in the room, the toning with gold, fixing and washing being afterwards performed. The method of mounting prints of different sizes was subsequently shown and after this some of the prints, which were previously produced, having been deemed sufficiently washed, were attached to glass in order to be dried and one which had been desiccated was stripped from the glass. The demonstration was a very important and successful one and all members present were delighted with the results. The meeting then closed.



Saturday 28th August 1886  Page 3 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

COLONIAL PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBITS IN ENGLAND
The Amateur Photographer (London publication) of 18th June publishes an account of the photographs sent from Victoria to the Colonial and Indian Exhibition. After referring in complimentary terms to the exhibits sent by the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria.



Tuesday 21st September 1886  Page 9 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Tuesday evening last, at the Royal Society's Hall. Mr. J M'Ewan, vice president occupied the chair. After the usual preliminary business, a letter was read from Mr. Musgrove, drawing the attention of the members to the subject of enlargements. Messrs C.T. Jones and Spooner were elected members and Messrs Harper and E. Williams were nominated. Mr. Bell then exhibited the method of intensifying weak negatives. Several thin ones were laid on the table and each one was used to show a different method of intensification - the bi-chloride of mercury and ammonia, ferrous oxalate, cyanide of silver, pyro and silver and other processes being described - and subsequently a negative, which had become over dense in development, was submitted to a process of reduction of density, the result being satisfactory. It was accomplished by the chloride of copper process. The usual discussion on the subject having been brought to a close the meeting broke up.



Thursday 23rd December 1886  Page 7 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)
Saturday 1st January 1887  Page 30 - The Leader (Melbourne, Vic.)

VICTORIAN PHOTOGRAPHS AT THE LONDON EXHIBITION
LONDON, 12th November

The photographic contribution to the Victorian Court has attracted much attention on the part of London professionals, who watch the development of antipodean art and evince no undisguised surprise at the excellence of the work shown, both portraiture and landscape. The leading organs of photography in London have given exhaustive criticisms, foremost in commendation being Messrs. Johnstone, O'Shanassy and Co., J.P. Lindt, Stewart and Co. and the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, the latter having lengthy and encouraging notices. At the meetings of the various professional societies the exhibit of photographs in the Victorian Court have been pronounced a decided success. The Victorian amateurs, at the invitation of their commissioner prepared a large number of transparencies suitable for the optical lantern, with a view to showing them on as large a screen as possible in the Exhibition Building; these pictures include views taken in Melbourne, Ballarat, Sandhurst, Castlemaine, comprise public buildings, instantaneous street scenes, views on various rivers and a set of interiors of the Parliament Houses and as a whole, give a capital idea of the country and also of the busy thoroughfares of Australian cities.

Such pictures, shown on a 30 feet disc, would have proved both instructive and highly interesting, in fact illustrating the colony as it really is and in a manner not attainable in any other way. Excellent as this project was, it unfortunately fell through — thanks to the red tapeism of the powers that be at South Kensington. Our commissioners no doubt have done their best, but the many difficulties in the way had not been taken into account and so the views never saw the light, at least as intended. Fortunately for the colony and for the many gentlemen who labored so well to produce these slides, it happened that Mr. E.W. Purton, an old Melbourne resident and an officer of the Photographic Society was in London, being on a visit to the old world, who on learning the state of affairs at once under took (with the cordial sanction of Mr. Bosisto) to introduce our Victorian pictures to British audiences. Commencing at Birmingham, where the exhibition proved a most pronounced success, several exhibitions have been held in the provinces and terminating with one held in the hall of the society, of watercolor painters in Pall Mall, under the auspices of the Photographic Society of Great Britain.

The large hall was inconveniently crowded with some 500 or 600 people (noticeable among whom were the attaches of the Chinese Embassy) a large proportion of the audience having come expressly to see the "Australian Show". All went well and the display proved the most successful of the series, judging from the applause which was frequent and the hearty manner in which the spectators seconded the vote of thanks. The electric light was used on this occasion with marked success, giving brilliant results. Such life like pictures thoroughly introduce our civilisation to our friends in England, the majority of whom have but a very poor idea of the wondrous strides the colonies are making, as evidenced in our street architecture, with their well kept roadways and palatial buildings. At the termination of each exhibition Mr. Purton was fairly inundated with all sorts of questions about the colony and when the geography was explained, much surprise was expressed that Australia was not all one. Many of the questioners wanted to know about business prospects and numerous other matters. There is no doubt but that Mr. Purton is deserving of every praise for undertaking such an arduous task which means both money and time expended, the work, however, being to him a labor of love, the appreciation everywhere expressed being to him an am-- repayment, his only regret being compelled to decline still further invitations.




Thursday 17th February 1887  Page 10 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The general monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Tuesday evening at the Royal Society's Hall. Mr. F. C. Bell presided. The usual routine business having been disposed of, Mr. Hughes was elected a member of and Mr. Stirling nominated for membership. Reference was made to the Adelaide Exhibition and it was mentioned by the Hon.Secretary that, if possible the society would be represented there. Promises of exhibits for the next annual exhibition of the association, were received from a few of the members present. An exhibition of lantern slides was then given. Transparencies by Messrs. Musgrove, Rouse, Ardern, R. W. Harvey, Spooner, Fullerton, Flegeltaub and the Hon.Secretary, were passed through the lantern. Some of these were on wet and dry collodion, but the majority were produced on plates coated with gelatino-chloride and chloro-bromide emulsions, whilst some were on special lantern plates. About 100 slides in all were shown, after which the meeting broke up.



Friday 18th March 1887  Page 6 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The general monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Tuesday evening, at the Royal Society's Hall, the attendance being very good. Mr. E.C. Bell presided. After the ordinary business was transacted, Mr. Musgrove described the methods he adopts and the formula he uses in the preparation of bromo-chloride gelatine plates for transparencies ; he then exhibited and described the special frame invented and constructed by himself for the printing of stereoscopic transparencies, also a printing frame for lantern slides. Then followed a demonstration of the printing and development of stereo-transparencies and lantern slides; they were printed by the aid of a "Silber lamp" and the light was afterwards turned down and the slides developed, fixed and exhibited in the stereoscope and lantern, the demonstration being a great success. He also exhibited a number of other slides in the stereoscope and a collection in the revolving frame of the association, showing both the negatives and under, over and correctly developed slides for the stereoscope and lantern. The method of mounting stereo-prints and lantern slides, was next shown, after which the meeting broke up.



Saturday 18th June 1887  Page 7 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Tuesday evening at the Royal Society's Hall. Mr. E.C. Bell presided. After the usual routine business five gentlemen were nominated for membership. A letter was read from the Ballarat Amateur Photographic Association, conveying particulars of an exhibition of the work of members which is to be held shortly in Ballarat. Mr. Henderson showed several prints of yachts and other instantaneous subjects, which had been obtained by means of a detective camera. The special business of of the evening was then proceeded with. Mr. Kernot practically demonstrated the method of enameling prints, from the cleaning of the glass to the stripping of the prints. He also briefly described other means of obtaining similar results. Several other members also gave their experiences in the enameling process, after which the proceedings terminated.



Wednesday 20th July 1887  Page 7 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Saturday 23rd July 1887  Page 28 - The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic.)

The fourth annual exhibition of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held at the Royal Society's rooms last night and was attended by a large number of invited friends. The display was a very large, varied and meritorious one, the exhibits including architectural photographs, landscapes and portraits and enlargements of landscapes and portraits, by Mr. James Musgrove, who made a new departure in introducing this kind of work as a member of the association. The prize for small landscapes was awarded to Mr. Harper and for portraits to Mr. Fullarton, while the set of interiors of Parliament Houses, done by J.H. Harvey, Hon.Secretary of the association, were adjudged to be the best in the architectural class. Mr. Musgrove gained the prize for general enlargements. Among the special exhibits were the enlargement of the proboscis of a bluebottle fly, which Messrs. Mansell and Swift had presented to the Microscopical Society, a set of West and Son's famous yachting pictures; specimens of London portrait work and photographs done by the Philadelphia Amateur Association. During the evening Mr. Harvey exhibited, by means of an optical lantern, transparencies of views which had been taken by himself and by Messrs. Bell and Musgrove and Miss A. Cooper, the only lady member of the association. The views, which were chiefly illustrative of Fernshawe and Marysville, were illuminated by means of the oxy-hydrogen limelight. The Queensland association sent some contributions to the collection, which were much admired.



Thursday 28th July 1887  Page 11 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Saturday 30th July 1887  Page 14 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The annual meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on the 18th July, at the Royal Society's Hall. The report and balance sheet for the year 1886-7 were adopted. The members then proceeded to ballot for office bearers for the ensuing year with the following results: President, Dr Browning, Vice Presidents Messrs E.C. Bell and F.A. Kernot; Hon.Secretary, Mr. J.H. Harvey; treasurer, Mr. J.J. Fenton; librarian, Mr. E.A. Walker; scientific custodian, Mr. E.W. Purton; committee Messrs. J. Lang, E.J. Hughes, J.H. Mulvaney, H.D. Grieve and C. Harper.

In connection with the annual exhibition the principal exhibitors were: Miss A.J. Cooper, Messrs. A.M. Atkin, H.D. Grieve, Edgar C. Bell, E.A. Walker, R.W. Harvie, C. Spooner, John Lang, G.T. Jones, William Porteous, J.J. Fenton, J.J. Rouse, E.H. Cooke, F.A. Kernot, J.H. Mulvany, C. Harper, James Musgrove, G.F. Fullerton, T. Ardern, J. Stead and J.H. Harvey, besides the Queensland Photographic Society and the Amateur Photographic Club of Philadelphia, U.S.A.



Saturday 6th August 1887  Page 6 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION of VICTORIA
Monthly MEETING on Monday, 8pm at Royal Society's Hall. Amateurs Invited.



Friday 12th August 1887  Page 7 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Tuesday evening at the Royal Society's hall. Mr. F. Kernot, vice-president, occupied the chair. Messrs. Porteous and Thompson were elected members and Messrs. C.B. Walker and Patrick were nominated. The resignation of the Hon.Secretary was handed in, but it was agreed to ask him to reconsider the matter. Mr. H.D. Grieve then read a paper entitled "The objects of the association and the best means of advancing its interests". After a short discussion, Messrs. E.H. Cooke and A.M. Henderson exhibited detective cameras, explained their use and showed work done by means of them. Mr. Henderson also showed an automatic apparatus for keeping the developer in motion during the progress of development. Mr. Kernot exhibited a whole plate dark slide and a new device for use in it when it is desired to carry smaller size plates. The carrier shown was a great improvement on the old fashioned "inner frames", as the same set (which together were equal to about one quarter the weight and bulk of a single inner frame) served for six plates of all sizes. Mr. Fenton also showed an instantaneous camera and shutter of a novel pattern. The meeting then broke up.



Saturday 13th August 1887  Page 14 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

At the ordinary meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, held on Tuesday evening at the Royal Society's Hall, Mr. Hughes in the chair, a paper was read by Mr. Grieve, the subject being. The Objects of the Institution and the Best Means of Advancing Its Interests. The principal of the exhibits, which were afterwards displayed, was a large collection of New Guinea photographs, taken by Messrs. Bell and Langford, showing native types, both male and female, of different tribes, dwellings and river and forest scenery.



Monday 19th September 1887  Page 10 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held at the Royal Society's hall on Tuesday evening. Mr. E.C. Bell, vice-president, in the chair. After the routine business, Messrs. C.B. Walker and Patrick were elected honorary members. The "question-box" contained inquiries concerning the mounting of the lenses in the camera for stereoscopic work, also the best manner of cutting and mounting the prints. These were replied to by various members. Several members explained various little particulars which they had found useful in practice. Mr. Lang showed an alteration in the front of the camera, which facilitated the interchange of lenses and the obtaining of more than one subject on a plate; various substitutes for the ordinary ground glass focusing screen were mentioned, one especially, which had greater advantages than ground glass and could be obtained at one twentieth the cost; this device had been in use for years by one member. Mr. A.M. Henderson showed a "finder" which he had ingeniously attached to his detective camera. Substitutes for the ordinary ruby lantern, as also a changing tent for use in the field, were also mentioned.



Thursday 13th October 1887  Page 11 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

On Tuesday evening, the 11th October, the monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held in the Royal Society's Hall, Mr. Kernot, vice-president, being in the chair. A letter was read suggesting that albums should be compiled by members of the society and sent to the different hospitals. A resolution was passed that the society do its best to carry out this laudable idea. Mr. Edgar Bell, one of the Vice Presidents, read a paper on silver printing and demonstrated how to sensitize albumenised paper, also gave information as to how to classify negatives according to their density and the varied exposures which prints should receive under different conditions of the weather.



Friday 13th April 1888  Page 4 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The general monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Tuesday evening at the Royal Society's Hall. Mr. E.C. Bell presided and there was a good attendance of members. The routine business having been transacted, Messrs. A.H. Farmer, A. Trickett and Horsfall were elected members of the society. Mr. Pettigrew reported having been present at a meeting of the Tasmanian Photographic and Fine Art Association and gave some account of its doings. Mr. J. Lang showed an improved printing frame, formed by a simple alteration of the ordinary stock printing frame and Mr. R.W. Harvie exhibited a flap shutter for stereoscopic work. The honorary Hon.Secretary then gave a demonstration of the working of the wet collodion process. A negative was illuminated by the light of the sciopticon and a transparency on a wet plate produced from it in the camera, the transparency being subsequently shown in the lantern. At the previous meeting of the society several portraits were taken by the magnesium ribbon, magnesium flash and the oxy-magnesium lights, the results being generally successful.



Saturday 12th May 1888  Page 12 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The ordinary monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Tuesday evening, at the Royal Society's Hall. Mr. F.A. Kernot, vice president, occupied the chair. The preliminary business having been disposed of, rules for the "Stewart" competition, open to all Victorian amateurs and particulars of which have been advertised in "The Argus" were placed upon the table. An exhibition of slides in the oxy-hydrogen lanterns of the association was then held. Mr. Kernot described a trip to Adelaide and back, also the scenery in and about Adelaide and on the road and illustrated it by a series of 80 lantern slides prepared by himself from negatives taken during a recent visit to the city. The display of slides by one or two of the remaining members brought the proceedings to a close.



Saturday 16th June 1888  Page 6 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Tuesday 19th June 1888  Page 9 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The general monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Tuesday evening, at the Royal Society's hall, Mr. F.A Kernot being in the chair. After the preliminary business two gentlemen were nominated for membership, Mr. Edgar C. Bell read a paper on "Orthochromatic Photography", describing and exhibiting various specimens of eosine, erythrosine, rose Bengal and other aniline colors. He also described in detail the methods used by himself for rendering ordinary gelatino-bromide plates orthochromatic and subsequently exhibited a chromo-lithograph and photographic copies thereof. These were taken on ordinary plates, with and without a colored screen and on orthochromatic plates, under like conditions, the screen in each case being interposed between the subject and the sensitive plate and the difference in the results was remarkable. The plate prepared according to the instructions given by the reader of the paper proved perfectly satisfactory and gave a faithful reproduction of the tones of the original. A hope was expressed by many that orthochromatic photography (which was introduced into the city by members of the association some years ago) would become generally used, as its value in copying works of art, photographing flowers, was undoubted.



Saturday 18th August 1888  Page 14 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The usual monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Tuesday evening, at the Royal Society's Hall. The Hon.Secretary exhibited a number of prints which had been received from American amateur societies and also some English prints. Mr. C. Watts showed negatives on the vegara films. A general conversation ensued, the subjects introduced comprising sensitive films, orthochromatic photography, gelatine bromide paper, gelatine plate making and photo-mechanical printing. At the annual meeting the report and balance-sheet were read and adopted and the election of office bearers for the year 1888-89 was proceeded with. The following were elected: President, Mr. E.C. Bell; vice-presidents, Messrs. F.A. Kernot and Jno. Lang; Hon.Secretary, Mr. J.H. Harvey; Hon.Treasurer, Mr. J.J. Fenton; Hon.Librarian, Mr. E.A. Walker; scientific custodian, Mr. R.W. Harvie; committee, Messrs. J.H. Mulvany, H.C. Ward, J. McEwan, A.M. Henderson and E.J. Hughes.



Saturday 17th November 1888  Page 22 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
ANNUAL EXHIBITION 1888
MELBOURNE ATHENAEUM


On the 6th, 7th, and 8th December, 1888

When some hundreds of pictures of the most beautiful and characteristic scenery of Australasia will be shown on a 20ft. disc brilliantly illuminated by the oxyhydrogen limelight - a truly lovely display.

A photographic novelty will be introduced. The audience will be photographed instantaneously at night by the new magnesium flashlight process.

Tickets procurable for 3s, 2s, and 1s and seats reserved at Nicholson's, 45 Collins-street east.




Thursday 6th December 1888  Page 7 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria will hold their annual exhibition tonight, tomorrow night and the following night in the Athenaeum. The views will be shown on the largest screen ever used in Melbourne. An instantaneous picture of the audience will be taken by the new magnesium flash light process.



Thursday 6th December 1888  Page 5 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria annual exhibition will be held this evening and two following nights in the Athenaeum. At the private exhibition on Tuesday, the views, which were shown on the largest screen ever used in Melbourne, were exquisitely beautiful and brilliantly illuminated. The most varied pictures were shown, including sea pieces, mountain views, ferny dells, instantaneous and other interesting views. The wonderful sensitiveness to which photographic plates have been brought will be shown at the exhibition by taking an instantaneous picture of the audience by the new magnesium flash light process.



Friday 7th December 1888  Page 8 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The fifth annual exhibition of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was opened last night at the Melbourne Athenaeum. The display of prints was larger in number than at any previous exhibition of the association and the improvement in quality, was most marked.

Specimens of almost every photographic process which is now worked were shown. The principal exhibitors were - Messrs. F.A. Kernot, John Lang, Miss Cooper, Messrs. R.W. Harvie, J.J. Fenton, E.C. Bell, E.H. Cooke, J.H. Harvey, A.M. Atkin, G. Williams, J.F. Gillespie, H.D. Grieve, A.H. Bell and C. Thompson.

Lenticular stereoscopes and slides were shown by Messrs. Edgar, C. Bell, F.A. Kernot and R.W. Harvie and J.H. Harvey exhibited a reflecting stereoscope made on the lines suggested by the late Professor Wheatstone, in which 10 x 8 prints were shown stereoscopically. This, although the oldest form of the stereoscope, is the first exhibited in the colony. The lanterns of the Association were located in the large hall under the management of Mr. Robert Harvie and during the evening over a hundred views were shown on a 20ft, disc, illuminated by the oxyhydrogen lime-light and comprised scenery in all parts of Victoria, New South Wales and South Australia. Miss Cooper and Messrs. Kernot, Cooke, Lang and J.H. Harvey showed albums filled with prints, which they are to present to the various hospitals. Messrs. J.W. Small and Co., Baker and Rouse and William Watson and Sons showed photographic appliances of all kinds, exhibiting the whole of the most modem improvements. Messrs. Baker and Rouse also showed some immense enlargements of local buildings and scenes, which were produced on argentic bromide paper.

The manner in which the exhibition is conducted, as well as the quantity and quality of the work shown, is evidence of the vitality of the society and fully justifies the members in their determination to keep the exhibition open during to-night and tomorrow night. The exhibition will be open each evening at 7.30 pm.


               

LENTICULAR STEREOSCOPES




Friday 7th December 1888  Page 6 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The members of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria opened their fifth annual exhibition last night in the Athenaeum. In the front room upstairs there is a very creditable collection of pictures covering a great variety of subjects and representing many processes. The specimens are arranged on the walls and tables for inspection. There are also several stereoscopes in use, with sets of photographs from characteristic Australian scenes and these admirable prints are among the most attractive features of the show. A section of the wall space is occupied with the work sent in to compete for the liberal awards offered by Mr. Stewart, photographer, who gives a first prize of £15 and a second of £7 for the best amateur work done outside a gallery. Seven entries have been received. The main hall downstairs is devoted to the display of transparencies by projecting them on a 20 feet screen with the aid of a sciopticon and the oxy-hydrogen limelight. Some 200 subjects, taken from the most beautiful scenery in all the colonies, are included in these excellent pictures, which show on the screen in natural size and with lifelike realism. The whole of the work shown is highly creditable and it would be out of place to add any qualification that it is the work of amateurs, for in many cases they can hold their own with professional operators. The association is presided over by Mr. E.C. Bell, the duties of Hon.Secretary are carried out by Mr. J.H. Harvey and the business manager is Mr. J. Lang, who superintended the arrangements of this exhibition. There are between 60 and 70 members, including one lady member, Miss Annie Cooper, whose pictures deserve notice. A thoughtful and graceful idea suggested by Miss Cooper is to be put into practice in connection with this display, in the presentation to the hospitals of about a dozen albums of chosen pictures, which will be a happy diversion to many a sufferer struggling through the tedious hours of convalescence. The exhibition will be open to-night and to-morrow night. As a novelty in photography the hall and its occupants are photographed each night instantaneously and a transparency of it shown on the screen on the following evening.



Friday 8th December 1888  Page 9 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

In the report of the meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria it was stated that prizes were given by "Mr. Stewart, photographer". The Mr. Stewart referred to is Mr. W.S. Stewart, of the amateur photographic depot, 109 Elizabeth-street.



Monday 10th December 1888  Page 5 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The exhibition of photographic works held by the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria in the Athenaeum came to a close on Saturday evening. There was a large attendance of visitors and the collection of prints and particularly the enlarged transparencies, were much admired. The judges in the competition for Mr. Stewart's prizes, Messrs. C. Mason and A. Baine, examined the specimens sent in and awarded the first prize of £15 to Mr. F.A. Kernot's comprehensive collection and the second prize of £7 to Mr. J.H. Harvey's bromide pictures, which included some excellent landscapes.



Friday 11th January 1889  Page 6 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Saturday 12th January 1889  Page 9 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The general monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held at the Royal Society's Hall on Tuesday evening, Mr. E.C. Bell presiding. Mr. G. Pearson was elected a member. An exhibition to be held in the Crystal Palace, London, next March, in order to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the publishing of the first photo. negative process, by Fox Talbot, was announced. The Hon.Secretary, Mr. J.H. Harvey then read a short paper on "Enlargements", briefly describing the various methods of enlargement practised at different times since the introduction of photography. The following specimens were shown: A carbon transparency as it appears after development; the same transparency, after intensification and in a fit state for producing enlarged negatives from, a transparency on a gelatino-bromide plate enlarged in the camera, a negative printed from this by contact and a silver print from the latter; also two direct enlargements on gelatino-bromide paper. The proceedings concluded with the successful development of an enlargement which was made in the room, the subject being a piece of sculpture and the enlargement produced by means of the lantern, after which the meeting broke up.



Friday 17th October 1890  Page 3 - North Melbourne Advertiser (Vic.)

The usual monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held in the Coffee Palace, Bourke street, on Tuesday evening. The President Mr. F. Kernot occupied the chair. After the close of the ordinary business a paper was read by Messrs J.J. Fenton and R.W. Harvie on Printing with Salts of Iron and Uranium - producing Prints in Black, Blue and Red. Also Printing Positives from Positives, making Prints from Lantern Transparencies, direct. The remarks made by these gentlemen were illustrated with samples of their experiments made by the various processes. The Hon.Secretary Mr. J.H. Harvey reported having received a set of photogravures from Emerson illustrative of his pet theories in the photographic art. The study of the subject from the "one point sharp view" caused considerable discussion and it was decided at a future meeting to devote an evening to the consideration of this important subject from a photographer and artist's standpoint. At the November meeting the President will by a series of experiments prove the light power of the lantern not by the mere saying "bright light" but its relative lighting properties as compared with the standard candle power.



Monday 20th October 1890  Page 7 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Wednesday 22nd October 1890  Page 6 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held at the Melbourne Coffee Palace on the 14th October, Messrs. J.J. Fenton (Hon.Treasurer) and W.R. Harvie described and demonstrated the methods of printing with iron and Uranium salts, the cyanotype, Pellet, Poitevin's and Uranium processes. Chemical experiments were made showing the different reactions of the persalts and protosalts of iron under the same re-agents, on which principle, combined with the reducing action of light on the persalts in presence of organic matter, the iron and Uranium processes depend. Practical demonstration was given of the development of the prints and some fine specimens were exhibited in Turnbull's blue by the cyanotype, in Prussian blue and in blue-black by the Pellet and in red by the Uranium process, some of the first and last (by Mr. Harvie) being greatly admired for their softness, gradation and detail. Copies of plans and engravings, taken direct from the originals, in both Prussian blue and blue black on a white ground and positive prints from lantern slides were also shown. It was incidentally remarked that some of the best samples of ammonio-citrate of iron - a chemical much used in medicine - varied considerably in color, ranging from a deep red to a greenish yellow and as might have been supposed from its organic nature, in its sensitiveness to light. This was clearly seen by some samples produced, one of which had been and others had not been, exposed to light. A number of fine photogravures, representing "Pictures of East Anglican Life", from photographs by Dr Emmerson, who presented them to the association, were also exhibited at the meeting. Mr. W. Rae was elected a member and several gentlemen were nominated for membership. Notice of motion was given to alter one of the rules with a view of imposing an entrance fee on new members.



Wednesday 16th September 1891  Page 5 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The Bankers Institute of Australasia will hold a meeting this evening at which a lecture on "The Australian Alps as a Field for Settlement" will be delivered by Mr. James Stirling F.R.G.S., illustrated by lime-light views shown by members of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria. Ladies are invited.



Thursday 17th September 1891  Page 7 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

THE BANKERS INSTITUTE
LECTURE ON THE AUSTRALIAN ALPS

A lecture, entitled "The Australian Alps as a Field for Settlement", was delivered last night at the Bankers Institute by Mr. James Stirling, F.R.G.S., before a large audience of ladies and gentlemen. Mr. J.G. Jennings, vice-president, in the absence of the president, occupied the chair and introduced the lecturer.

Mr. Stirling said it appeared to him that more permanent settlement in the rural districts all over the Victorian territory must take place if the progress and prosperity of the colony was to be maintained. The congestion of the population in the metropolis was by no means a healthy sign, for whatever were the industrial, manufacturing and commercial prospects in the urban areas, these necessarily depended on the production of raw material. If such supplies were not kept up manufacturing industries must languish. The lecturer then introduced the Australian Alps as a field for settlement. In the course of a detailed description of the scientific formation of the earths and rocks and their chemical properties in relation to agricultural and vegetable matter, Mr. Stirling said that comparatively little was known of the Australian Alps and surrounding district In various portions of the Alps the soil possessed all the conditions necessary to grow every vegetable matter in existence. All the table lands were alpine in character and during midsummer formed splendid pasturage. The timber, which was varied, at a height of 5,000ft to 5,900ft became dwarfed. A glance at the geology of the area would show that the richness of the soil was due to a great extent to the decomposition of the great rock masses. The climate was well adapted for wheat up to 3,000ft. He had seen potatoes grown by miners at about 4,000ft altitude. Parsnips, carrots turnips, were also grown successfully at 4,000ft and higher. The climate might be classed into snow, rain and temperate. Snow fell every winter at an elevation above 2,000ft. In the vicinity of Omeo plains, winter commenced with snow showers towards the end of May, June, July and part of August were snowy months. The rainfall at 2,000ft was from 25in. to 30in. per annum, at 4,000ft 40in. to 50in. per annum and at 5,000ft to 6,000ft 66in. per annum. Up to the present the Australian Alps were inaccessible for the want of roads and tracks. The Government should devote a sum of money for the making of roads to promote settlement in the district in the same way as had been done in other parts of the colony by water channels. In conclusion, what was really required was a class of settlers not unused to a cold climate and skilled in rearing stock and vegetable products of the cold zones, who should be encouraged to settle and sufficient inducement should be offered them to take up portions of the summits of the table-lands and mountain peaks, while provision should be made for unrestricted search for minerals. He believed that before the present century had passed away the almost untrodden and uninhabited wilds of the Australian Alps in Victoria would become, with population, areas of production yielding by its pastoral and agricultural resources a great variety of stock and vegetable products which could not be cultivated in any other part of Australia, while the development of its metallic and mineral resources could not fail to add materially to future sources of national wealth to the coming commonwealth of Australia.

The Chairman thanked Mr. Stirling for his interesting lecture.

Baron Von Mueller, in proposing a vote of thanks to Mr. Stirling, testified to the value of Mr. Stirlings remarks on the Australian Alps. The Minister of Mines, whose interest had been aroused in the Australian Alps, had intimated to him his intention of traveling through the Alps during the recess.

Mr. Elliott M. Cairnes F.G.S., seconded the motion, which was carried with applause.

Mr. Stirling was aided in his lecture by a number of lime-light views of the Australian Alps and the surrounding district shown by the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria. After a vote of thanks to the chairman the proceedings terminated.




Monday 16th July 1894  Page 1 - The Ballarat Star

The Ballarat Amateur Photographic Association continued their exhibition in the School of Mines on Friday afternoon and evening. During the afternoon a large number of persons paid a visit and expressed themselves as much pleased with the exhibits. In the evening the room was crowded and the entertainment was enlivened with songs by Miss L. Casly and Mr. J.T. Vercoe, Mrs Dorter presiding at the piano. The singing of Miss Casly was much admired, this being her first appearance in public. During the evening the president (Mr. W.H. Wooster) presented a quarter-plate camera, which had been kindly donated by Messrs J.W. Small and Co., of Melbourne, to Miss E. Ison Baker, the successful competitor in the contest for the best print from an untouched negative. The lantern exhibition consisted of views kindly lent by the Gordon College Photographic Association, Geelong and the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, Melbourne. The views were of a splendid character and each was received with applause by the large number of persons present. The Hon.Secretary’s duties which were unusually heavy — were carried out very satisfactorily in connection with the whole affair. A special vote of thanks was carried by acclamation to the gentlemen of Geelong and Melbourne who had lent the lantern slides and other pictures to the exhibition and also to Messrs Small and Co. for their special prize. The exhibition was brought to a close amid many expressions of admiration.


LANDSCAPE: CLASS I:

LANDSCAPE: CLASS II:

LANDSCAPE: CLASS III:

ENLARGEMENTS:

FIRST
Miss Oddie
SECOND
H. Crisp
FIRST
A. Saunders
SECOND
J. Fletcher
THIRD
W.H. Wooster
FIRST
F.W. Niven
SECOND
F.W. Niven
THIRD
F.W. Niven
HON. MENTION
W.H. Wooster

SCIENTIFIC:

BROMIDE OPALS:

BROMIDE CONTACT:

FIRST
Miss E. Ison Baker
SECOND
W.H. Wooster
THIRD
Miss E. Ison Baker
FIRST
H. Crisp
SECOND
F. Foster
THIRD
F. Foster
FIRST
A. Saunders
SECOND
Miss E. Ison Baker
THIRD
A. Saunders

INSTANTANEOUS: CLASS I:

INSTANTANEOUS: CLASS II:

STILL LIFE:

FIRST
J. Fletcher
SECOND
H. Crisp
THIRD
H. Crisp
FIRST
F.W. Niven
SECOND
F.W. Niven
THIRD
F.W. Niven
FIRST
F. Foster
SECOND
F. Foster
THIRD
F. Foster

PORTRAITURE: CLASS I:

PORTRAITURE: CLASS II:

STEREOSCOPIC:

FIRST
J. Fletcher
SECOND
F.W. Niven
THIRD
Miss Oddie
FIRST
W.H. Wooster
SECOND
H.G. Brown
THIRD
W.H. Wooster
FIRST
J.J. Young
SECOND
W.H. Wooster
THIRD
F. Foster

CARBON PRINTS:

MICROSCOPIC:

INTERIORS:

OPEN CLASS: LANDSCAPE:

FIRST
H. Crisp
SECOND
H. Crisp
FIRST
W.H. Wooster
FIRST
A. Saunders
SECOND
H. Crisp
THIRD
A. Saunders
FIRST
G.H. Brinsmead
Geelong
SECOND
G.H. Brinsmead
Geelong
THIRD
J. Hammerton
Geelong

OPEN
CLASS:
YACHTS:

LANTERN SLIDES:

SPECIAL PRIZES:
LANDSCAPE:

BEST PORTRAIT FROM
UNTOUCHED NEGATIVE:
prize 1/4 plate camera,
gift of Messrs J. Small and Co.,
Melbourne:

SPECIAL PRIZES:
COMBINATION PRINT
CHRISTMAS CARD:

FIRST
C.C Dentry
Geelong
FIRST
F. Foster
SECOND
Miss E. Ison Baker
THIRD
J.J. Young
FIRST
H. Crisp

FIRST
Miss E. Ison Baker

HON.MENTION
F. Foster


Public vote: No, 466, bromide enlargement of portrait, exhibited by Mr. A.F. Scott.



November 1894  Page 12 - THE PHOTOGRAPHIC REVIEW OF REVIEWS

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
The general meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Wednesday evening, November 14th, at the Royal Society’s Rooms, Melbourne. The attendance was good, and Mr F.A. Kernot was voted to the chair. Messrs. A.J. Relph, E.J. Mulrea, and J.P. Campbell were elected members. Correspondence was read from the trustees of the Exhibition, and a program of the proposed Photographic Congress was passed round to members, who also had their attention drawn to the manner in which photographic exhibitions are worked in New Zealand. There the societies have come to an understanding that they will unite for exhibition purposes, and it was suggested that the same idea might be adopted in Australia. The program was well got up, and contained several prints from half-tone process blocks which represented prominent photographs in the Exhibition. Messrs. Holtz and Walker showed specimens of work done on the samples of Star Paper which had been distributed at the previous meeting, and Mr. Holtz also showed a few stereoscopic prints from the neighborhood of Fernshawe. Mr. Vanheems then exhibited Sutton’s Panoramic Camera, with curved back and Globe lens, together with negatives taken on curved glasses, and a printing frame made to accommodate them. A description of the instrument and the principles on which it is constructed was read, and the negatives, which were remarkably good, having been handed round for inspection, the meeting closed.



Saturday 1st December 1894  Page 15 - Advocate (Melbourne, Vic.)

Although the photographic art has already been brought to a high state of excellence, it is shown from the improvements in it which are being constantly effected that it has not yet reached perfection. And as it is one that is not less useful than ornamental, we notice with pleasure that the Exhibition trustees have determined to hold an exhibition of the art in the galleries connected with the Aquarium. The exhibition will embrace all the various branches of the art and will include portraiture, landscape and scenery subjects, together with specimens of photogravure, autotype and all the various processes of reproduction of pictures from photographs, together with an exposition of the application of photography to art, industry and commerce. A special section will be placed at the disposal of amateurs for the exhibition of their work and a separate room will be placed at the disposal of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria. The exhibition should stimulate emulation and so contribute to the higher development of the art.



Saturday 26th January 1895  Page 7 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

Good progress has been made with the arrangements for the photographic exhibition which opens on Tuesday next. The members of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria have more than filled the section placed at their disposal and more space is being provided for them. A notable exhibit promises to be that of Mr. J.W. Lindt, who is showing a complete set of his large photograph of New Guinea subjects, decorated with curios collected by himself in the islands. The gallery of photogravures and auto-types is already nearly complete, as is the collection of painting by Victorian artists.



Monday 28th January 1895  Page 4 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The photographic exhibition which is to be opened to-morrow is rapidly assuming completed shape. The members of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria have already filled the section placed at their disposal and more room is required for entries still coming to hand. Monsignor O'Hea has lent a complete set of Mr. J.W, Lindt's large New Guinea pictures, which the artist is arranging in person, completing the decoration with a number of rare curios which he collected when on an exploring tour in the islands. Messrs Fergusson and Mitchell, Robertson and Moffat, Stevens and Coand W.J. Tiller are fitting up a whole gallery with photogravures and reproductions of works of art by various photographic processes. The exhibition promises to be in every way a most interesting one.



Wednesday 30th January 1895  Page 7 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The exhibition of photographic art held in connection with the aquarium and loan collection of pictures by Victorian artists was opened yesterday in one of the Galleries of the Exhibition Building. A new stairense has been erected, at the head of which the show cases of various photographic manufacturers and importers come in view, containing all the wonderful and mysterious appliances of the craft. A few feet further is a kiosk, thu sides of which are formed completely of transparencies, representing architecture, scenery, seascapes and instantaneous photographs of every conceivable sport and action on the earth or the waters under the earth. Enclosing this are the photographs exhibited by the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, of these there are several hundred. The scene which imparts the most vivid impression is probably David H. Fox's The Old Mill, a presentment of an exquisite piece of landscape, executed in a manner which does complete justice to the subject. Two vignettes A.J. Relph, of the Queen's and South Wharves, are of a class of photograph well suited for reproduction and the contrasts of light and shade are well balanced and excellently produced. The framed opals by H.J. Trowbridge should be popular, the delicacy and depth of the shadows combining to strength of outline and giving an effect of unique character. Beyond the arch are a number of bays, in which different city firms of photographers give examples of their skill in portraiture, the majority of which are already familiar to the public by medium of their show cases; these cluster around the enlargements and opal vignettes of the society beauties and footliglit favorites, who vie with each for supremacy of attraction, while the youthful population crowds with admiring eye about the groups of athletes which appear ever and again among them. The fourth section is devoted to process reproductions of works of art. Nearly all the masterpieces of the last decade find representation here, either as photogravure, autotypes or silver prints. A dozen oil painted photographs opposite attract attention at once, one in particular, Love in Idleness, after Alma Tadema R.A., presenting an effect of color excellent in line and harmony and probably adhering closely to the work of the original. The aquarelles, hanging a little further along, are good examples of this popular form of reproduction but one or two, though termed "facsimiles", are evidently far more highly colored than the original. On the screens in the centre of the gallery probably the prettiest pictures, if not the prettiest in the whole exhibition, are L.H. Ussher's colored photographs of Japanese views; the Cherry Blossom and Tea House at Nyem Park, Tokio, is one of those scenes in which all the fantastic ideality of a Japanese fan seems to appear in the concrete, thrown on paper by the camera and The Great Gate at Nikko presents a specimen of Japanese architecture as rare as it is beautiful. The intermediate screens are occupied by the different workers in reproduction of photographs, line drawing by photo process, specimen of a high character of half-tones, photo engravings, photo lithography, collotypes, being shown and the last one contains the exhibits of F. Critchley Parker. Among the many photographs in this case, The Ruined Mill of Sirius is the prettiest landscape, while Graditum, Solid and Photophere all exhibit good work. Spas shows some little audacity in his presentation of a nude classical subject, of which it is to be regretted he has not taken the best advantage, for the pose of his model is badly arranged. The second gallery is occupied by 186 picture by well known Victorian artists, including Douglas Richardson, E.P. Fox, Loureiro, Ford, Paterson and others and four examples of sculpture.



Friday 1st February 1895  Page 7 - Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic.)

For interest, instruction and amusement combined, the Exhibition trustees are to be congratulated on arranging such a comprehensive representation of the art of photography as practised in Melbourne. The exhibition is not intended to show the gradual development of photography, which any one can see for himself by comparing the collection of photographs accumulated during the last twenty years, but rather to emphasize the present state of perfection to which photographers have brought their art. In the first section devoted to appliances and materials used in photography, four firms set before the spectators the secrets of the treasure-house. Messrs. Baker and Rouse, Messrs. J.W. Small and Company, Messrs. W. Watson and Sons and Mr. C.B. Howslip. But it is only the cognoscenti - in photography - that this section attracts.

The average sight - seer hurries on to the portraits of No. 3 section, where Messrs. Johnstone, O'Shannessy and Company's life-like pictures of His Excellency the Governor and the Countess of Hopetoun occasion unbounded admiration. Messrs. Foster and Martin, in addition to some delicate drawings on opal, make a specialty of their "New Midgets" and a series of clerical dignitaries. Messrs. J. Yeoman and Company appeal to the maternal and paternal feelings, with their family groups, looking so pleased with themselves and with the world. The Borroni studio is the chosen temple of the cyclist. In the court at the exhibition a lady is kneeling, gazing in rapt admiration on some distinguished votary of the wheel. "That", she whispers, "is the first lady cyclist - that is Mrs Sarah Maddock who traveled from Sydney on her bicycle". In the court occupied by Talma the walls are lined with theatrical favorites, both the artists and the photographs being of the same class-first. The Messrs. Stubb show a highly interesting group - Charles Latrobe (first Governor of Victoria), William Haines (first Premier), Bishop Perry (first Bishop) and Edward Henty (first settler). Mr. J.W. Lindt's process portrait enlargement is effectively illustrated in a representation of Sir Anthony Brownless. The collection of New Guinea pictures, lent by Monsignor O'Hea, have an additional value, inasmuch as they are reliable illustrations of the life of a country little known to Australians, but which has furnished Mr. Lindt with innumerable subjects.

The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria well deserve all the praise that has been bestowed upon them, for one and all they evince the greatest care and attention on what, while passing as a hobby, is in reality a labor of love. Mr. A.J. Relph has gained some picturesque effects in his views of Healesville, Grampian, Buffalo and Bright scenery. Mr. David H. Fox presents a good clear illustration of Weeping Rock, Blue Mountains and another of Morley's Track, near Fernshaw. Mr. J.C. Kaufmann has worked up a poetic idea in his solitude on the rocks. A variety of striking beauty-spots, not much heard of by the traveler on the beaten route, do justice to Mr. A. Barlow's industry. Equally good is Mr. E.W. Purton's frame of Lorne and Marysville views. His statuary memorial, characteristic of four continents, is a capital study in light and shade. Mr. John Bee has made a specialty of some excellent quarter-plate views of villa residences. Mr. James Musgrove, in "The Forge", shows an interesting carbon enlargement from a flashlight negative. Some views of the Buffalo river scenery by Mr. W. Farquhar; a frame of Tasmanian scenery by Mr. Frederick Holtz; a series of water studies by Mr. E.H. Cook and a numerous collection of views of well-known localities by Mr. J.C. Stevens, attest the increasing value of this class of work. Mr. H.J. Trowbridge's Tasmanian views; street-scenes by Mr. H.P. Bennett; a frame of views by Mr. H.C. Ward and some typical colonial subjects by Mr. A.E. Bennett, offer a pleasant variation. Mr. J.H. Harvey has been very successful with preserving the characteristics of the scenery of the Blue Mountains and Jenolan Caves. Mr. E. Wood's incidents of colonial life and a series of views by Mr. J.T. Gillespie, Mr. J. Pettigrew and Mr. J.H. Mulvany, are so natural and clear as to emphasize the delicacy of the apparatus used. The formidable bacillus, the ineradicable end-of-the-century evil is held up to observing eyes by Mr. J.T. Nelly, in a series of patiently executed studies.

Coming events cast their shadows before, therefore marine photography and yachting, of which Mr. Frederick Kernot has made a feature, are actually the first hint of the coming craze - and the coming Governor - for amateur photography like everything else, must follow the fashion. In this instance Mr. Kernot leads it. Mr. C.W. Watts has fallen a victim to the charms of Heidleberg and its vicinity, which he successfully reproduces. Some effective statuary groups by Mr. H.J. Trowbridge, complete this section.

Visitors should not forget the Kiosk in the center of the gallery, which is fitted up with some hundreds of lantern slides, executed by members of the association and presenting an admirable proof of the Kodak's efficiency. Several of the landscapes are perfect gems in their way for daintiness of finish.

The magnificent selection of autotypes and photogravures exhibited by Messrs. Robertson and Moffat are an art training in themselves. It is pleasant to see the plenitude of space allotted to them. Now that people are waking up to a sense of their value, the firm cannot be too highly complimented on their enterprise in putting such a truly fine collection before the public. When it is known that the African lion " Majesty" - the largest autotype ever brought to the colonies - is on view, with Millet's Gleaners, Burne Jones famous Briar Rose and allied reproductions of great works, this court should immediately become a popular rendezvous. Messrs. W.K. Stevens, Mr. W.J. Tiller and Messrs. Ferguson and Mitchell also exhibit a series of fine-art engravings, photographs, autotypes and photogravures of pictures in European galleries.

Space does not permit of more than an allusion to the oil-painted photographs and acquarelles (hand colored photogravures in water-colors), exhibited by Messrs. Ferguson and Mitchell. Any work may be singled out for its perfect finish.

In process work there are a dozen different varieties. Messrs. Wilson and McKinnon, Messrs. David Syme and Company, Mr. Critchley Parker, Messrs. Patterson and Company are prominent for skilfully executed examples. A Ballarat firm, Messrs. F.W. Niven and Company, send samples of collotype work, many being impressions from plates after 10,000 copies have been run off. Mr. Victor Henry, who is a born colorist, supplies several instances of his skill in glass etching and other directions. Messrs. Sands and M'Dougall's specimens of zinc etching and photo lithography and Messrs. A.H. Massina's half-tone reproductions are an amazing proof of the advance of art in this direction. Mr. W.S. Calvert's photo-engraving, Mr. Morris Cohn's enlarged bromide photo, Mr. Launcelot Ussher's series of hand-colored Japanese photographs, Mr. L.J. Lessen's studies and Mr. Sydney L. Officer's Victorian and Tasmanian views enhance the attractions of this court. Two ladies - Miss Trickett in a copy of a photograph and Mrs Pater in an example of French tinting, cause some wonder that so few women have come forward.

The end gallery is given up to an exhibition of about 200 paintings of Victorian artists, though a large proportion has been seen before. The bulk of the pictures are so good as to be welcome wherever they are. These pictures give the final touch of completeness to the exhibition, which is held in connection with the aquarium and museum.


PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION
MELBOURNE EXHIBITION BUILDING 1895




Friday 17th April 1896  Page 5 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

An inter-colonial photographic exhibition and congress on the lines of the exhibition held at Geelong a year ago is to be opened in the Exhibition-building on Wednesday next by His Excellency Lord Brassey, the Governor of Victoria. The exhibition is being undertaken by the Working Men's College Photographic Club, assisted by the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, under the auspices of the Exhibition trustees, and is designed to extend a knowledge of the principles of photography to those interested in but having no practical acquaintance with the subject, and to enlarge the theoretical and practical horizoon of those who follow the art either for pleasure or profit. A series of lectures on some of the more interesting and complicated processes of photography is being arranged, and twice a week lantern demonstrations will be given illustrative of many of the industries and picturesque spots of the colonies. A demonstration of the Rontgen process will be given by Professor Lyle on the opening day, and the results will be exhibited on a screen during the evening by Mr. Ludovico W. Hart, the Hon.Secretary of the congress. The prize-list includes separate classes for professionals and for amateurs, and sections will be found for almost every branch of photography.


THOMAS BRASSEY

Born 11th February 1836 - Stafford, Staffordshire, England
Died 23rd February 1918 - England


GOVERNOR OF VICTORIA 1895 to 1900




Monday 14th September 1896  Page 2 - Geelong Advertiser (Vic.)

The members of the Gordon College Amateur Photographic Association derived a good deal of practical information in regard to lantern slide and transparency work from a lecture given on Friday evening by Mr. J.H. Harvey, the Hon.Secretary of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria. A technical description of the methods followed with success by the lecturer in regard to the preparation and development of plates, was followed by a satisfactory demonstration, the different results attending the use of various processes being afterwards illustrated by means of the lantern. The pictures thrown on to the screen were conspicuous for clearness and fine tone and the lecturer was accorded a hearty vote of thanks at the close. It was announced during the evening that Mr. Wrathall's prize for fox terrier pictures had been secured by Mr. G.H. Brinsmead, with Mr. Waddell second.



Saturday 14th September 1901  Page 10 - The Register (Adelaide, SA)

The monthly meeting of the South Australian Photographic Society was held at the society of arts rooms on Thursday 12th September. There was a good attendance of members and visitors and the President, Mr. A.H. Kingsborough, occupied the chair. Four new members were nominated for election at next meeting and four new members nominated at last meeting were elected. The following circular letter was received from the Queensland Amateur Photographic Society and was referred to the committee: With regard to my circular letter of 13th May last, bringing under your notice the question of an Australian branch of the affiliation of the Royal Photographic Society of London, I am instructed to again write to you on the matter and to state that favorable replies have now been received from the following societies: Photographic Society of New South Wales, Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, Northern Tasmania Camera Club, Dunedin Photographic Society, South Australian Photographic Society. With regard to further steps my committee considers that it is advisable for each society to affiliate separately with the London society without delay and that further action should take the form of an association or federation of the societies so affiliated for purposes to be defined. I am requested to ask that your society will take steps, if you have not already done so, to affiliate with the London society. My committee will in the meantime take into further consideration the details of a scheme for cooperation and will address you again on that matter as soon as possible. It would, at the same time, be of advantage for your committee also to take the question into consideration, but for the present I have two principal points to suggest, (1) The holding of an annual, biennial, or triennial congress of photographers in the chief cities and that (2) the initiating of such congresses would appropriately come from one of the senior states, say, either New South Wales or Victoria. The question of allowing members nominated at this meeting for election at next meeting to compete in the annual exhibition of the society, to be held during the week, 14th to 19th October, was discussed. It was pointed out that the rules would not allow it and it was resolved that persons concerned should be informed of this fact and that the society would be pleased to see their work exhibited in the non-competitive section. The President announced that many satisfactory enquiries had been received from photographers in the eastern states and Tasmania for prospectuses of the exhibition and that he anticipated a large number of entries from the other states.



Saturday 26th March 1898  Page 15 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The fifteenth annual meeting of this society was held on Thursday, when the report and balance sheet for 1897-98, which showed the association to be in a satisfactory position, were adopted. The following officers were elected unopposed: President, Dr. Kaufmann; treasurer, Mr. F.W. Miscamble; custodian, Mr. E.W. Purton; Hon.Secretary, Mr. J.H. Harvey. A ballot was taken for vice-presidents and members of council, with the following result: Vice-presidents, Messrs. E.C. Bell and H.C. Ward; council, Messrs. W. Farquaar, E.H. Cooke, F. Holtz, F.A. Kernot, E. Newman, D.W. Paterson, H.J. Trowbridge, C.W. Watts.



Tuesday 3rd May 1898  Page 6 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Thursday 5th May 1898  Page 6 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

At the meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria which was held at the Royal Society's Hall on Thursday evening, there was a very large attendance, about 150 members and visitors being present. Dr. Kauffmann (president) occupied the chair and Messrs. A.M. Henderson, W. Aitken and H. Clutten were elected members. Particulars concerning the forthcoming exhibition of the Photographic Society of New South Wales were placed on the table and on the completion of the ordinary business Mr. J. Yeoman gave an exhibition of the cinematograph. The Hon.Secretary in a lecture, briefly described the evolution of the photography of moving objects from the time of the introduction of photography to date and detailed the general principles on which the cinematograph works. Several animated pictures were passed through the instrument, among them being some new subjects just received from London, which were lent by Messrs. William Watson and Sons. In the intervals between the cinematograph pictures lantern slides made by members of the association were projected upon the screen, among which was one showing the Edina on the rocks.



Friday 22nd July 1898  Page 7 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)
Thursday 26th July 1898  Page 3 - Tasmanian News (Hobart, Tas.)

NEW DEPARTURE IN PHOTOGRAPHIC PRINTING
At the meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, held at the Royal Society's Hall, on Tuesday evening (Mr. C.W. Watts presiding), Mr. T. Baker (Messrs Baker and Rouse) introduced to the notice of the members a new argentic bromide paper, for obtaining prints by contact. This is a slow bromide paper, made with the same variety of surface as characterizes the various make of "Austral paper". The great peculiarity of this paper, however and the marked feature which distinguishes it from all others and gives it an extraordinary value, particularly to those who object to working in the orange or ruby light of the darkroom, or who are so unfortunate as to suffer from weak sight, is the fact that it may not only be exposed by gaslight but it can be afterwards developed in the same light. It is also sufficiently slow to allow of the making of prints by daylight.

Mr. Baker brought to the meeting some prints that had been already exposed and after mixing the developer, which is of a simple nature and explaining the variations which could be made in it, he exposed a large number of pieces of the paper to the light of the incandescent gas burner with which the room is illuminated, giving different exposures at varying distances from the light. A screen of cord was then improvised and hung underneath the burner, so as to shot off its direct rays and in the shadow of this screen and in full view of all the members, the development took place; the light of an ordinary gas burner, some 6ft away was allowed free access to the paper during the whole time of development. The prints developed up perfectly the high lights and the margins of the paper, which had been covered by the rebates of the printing frames, remaining absolutely white. Development of some of the prints was conducted by rubbing over them a piece of cotton wool which had been saturated with the developer and was completed in a few seconds. Others were developed by placing them in a dish of the developing solutions in the customary way. Five prints were made from the same negative and developed each with a developer of a different strength, in order to show the latitude possessed by the paper and the variety of result yielded. The fixing was done in an acid fixing bath, the chemistry of which Mr. Baker illustrated by a simple experiment before the members. On being taken from the washing water, the prints were found to be identical in appearance with bromide or platinum prints produced in the orthodox fashion. On the motion of Mr. K.W. Purton, a hearty vote of thanks was accorded to the demonstrator.




21st January 1899  Page 20 and 21 - The Australasian Photographic Review

A meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held at the Royal Society’s Hall on Wednesday, 14th December, at which Dr. Kaufmann presided. After the election of members, the President announced that after this month the meetings of the Association would be held in Pleasance’s Buildings, Collins-street. As it was lantern night, all other business was suspended. Mr. E. Norton Grimwade then gave a description of some portions of Western Australia, including Perth, Coolgardie, Kalgoorlie, Southern Cross, and Jarrahdale. His remarks were illustrated by a number of lantern slides from his negatives, some of which were of great interest, and the value was increased by the pleasant manner in which the description was given. The views about the mills at Jarrahdale showed that the “West” does not consist entirely of the inhospitable country which many folks think it is wholly composed of, as the fine timber shown is evidence that good bush scenery is not wanting in parts. Mr. A.J. Hart showed a number of interesting views in the Western District of Victoria, and slides were also shown by the Hon. Treasurer and Mr. C.W. Watts. The Hon.Secretary showed views of parts of the Capertee Valley, N.S.W., also a number of bits on the Moorabool River and a collection of sea-side studies. Some of the most remarkable slides shown were from negatives by Mr. A.M. Atkin, one of the founders of the Association. This is the first work shown by Mr. Atkin for some years, and was excellent. The scenes were of a military tournament held at the Melbourne Exhibition Building some time since, and were all taken with the focal plane shutter. The manner in which the images of jumping and galloping horses had been caught by the shutter drew frequent bursts of applause from the visitors. A meeting was held on Thursday 22nd December. This being the last of the year was of a conversational nature, the topics discussed embracing several branches of work.

AT A MEETING OF THE VICTORIAN SOCIETY
A FLASHLIGHT

by H.T. Trowbridge




21st April 1899  Page 24 and 25 - The Australasian Photographic Review

The opening night of the year (the evening of February 14th) of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was celebrated in the customary fashion, the proceedings taking the form of a smoke social. Songs and recitations were given by several members and friends, and a number of imported lantern slides were passed through the lantern. In addition to the above several slides illustrating the action of the X rays was shown, and also some figure subjects produced by Messrs. F.A. Fitts and R.W. Harvie, A meeting was held on Thursday 23rd February, at which Dr. Kauffman presided. Being the first meeting held in the new rooms, the president congratulated the members on the change, and remarked that in consequence of the extra convenience of the position the attendance would still further improve. Dr. Bull and Mr. Muirhead were elected members. Mr. N.J. Caire then introduced to the notice of the members a new printing-out paper, “R.E.X.”, which he is manufacturing. He explained the various steps which led up to the production of the paper, afterwards demonstrating the method of using it, the toning and fixing of a number of prints being conducted in the room. He showed a large number of prints which had been made upon the paper, and gave his experience as to the permanence of them. After the asking and answering of a large number of questions the meeting broke up. A meeting was held on Tuesday 14th March, Dr. Kauffmann (the President) in the chair. Nominations for office-bearers and Council for the year 1899-1900 were received, after which a talk on "Dark Room Practice” was indulged in. Several members gave the results of their experience in detail, the precautions taken to combat dust, and the arrangements for keeping the plate and developer in motion during a protracted development receiving special attention. On Thursday 23rd March, the Annual Meeting was held. The report and balance sheet were read and adopted. The former informed members that the Association had made substantial progress during the past year, and the balance sheet showed that after allowing for payment of all liabilities, a credit balance exceeding that of last year remained. The election of new officers and council was then proceeded with, with the following result.

President; Mr. C.W. Watts (unopposed). Vice-Presidents: Messrs. H.C. Ward and H.J. Trowbridge. Hon.Secretary; Mr. J.H. Harvey, A.R.V.I.A. Hon.Treasurer, Mr. F.W. Miscamble, A.I.A. (unopposed). Hon. Custodian of Apparatus: Mr. E.W. Purton. Council: Messrs. H. Ashworth, A.W. Craven, M.L.A., J.T. Gillespie, F.A. Kernot, H. Mais (M. Inst. C.E.), J.H. Mulvany, E. Newman, and E.A. Walker.




24th June 1899  Page 22 and 23 - The Australasian Photographic Review

A meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held at the rooms, 178 Collins-street, on Thursday 25th May, Mr. C.W. Watts, President, in the chair. Several members brought prints for exhibition. Enlargements of landscape subjects were shown by the President; gum-bichromate and carbon prints, by Mr. Ashworth; landscape and marine prints, by Mr. Gillespie; photographs of still-life and landscape subjects, by Mr. Goslett; and Messrs. Glover and Hart and the Hon.Secretary showed stereographs.

LADIES SOCIAL
On Wednesday 14th June, the lady and other friends of members were entertained at a social, at which there was a very large attendance. The musical portion of the program was contributed to by Miss E. Aebi, Miss Winnie Windas, Messrs. R. Stewart, W.A. Windas, R. Perryman, and F. Menzies; Miss May Windas, Mr. Cresswell, and Mr. W.A. Windas gave recitations. Mr. J. Aebi described a series of lantern slides illustrating the scenery of the Rhine, and a number of slides lent by Mr. E.A. Walker, illustrative of the South Coast of England, were exhibited, the optical lantern of the Association and limelight arrangements being under the charge of Mr. E. Purton. Light refreshments were served during the evening. On behalf of the visitors, Mr. A.O. Sachse, M.L.C., who has recently been over some of the ground covered by the lantern slides, proposed a vote of thanks to the performers, after which the party separated.




22nd July 1899  Page 24 - The Australasian Photographic Review

A meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held at the rooms on Thursday 22nd June, at which there was a good attendance. Mr. C.W. Watts (president) occupied the chair. Mr. R. Byrne was elected a member. After the preliminary business had been disposed of, Mr. H.J. Trowbridge exhibited the Rilford oxygen generator and explained its working. A supply of oxygen was afterwards made in it and a number of slides projected on the screen. The General Meeting for July was held on Tuesday, 11th inst., Mr. C.W. Watts in the chair. After the transaction of ordinary business, a paper on “The Chemistry of some of the substances used in Photography" was read by Mr. A.J. Hart M.A. Mr. Hart described the composition and action of the benzine derivatives, the caustic alkalies, carbonates, sulphur compounds, gold chloride, ferrous and ferric salts, uranium salts, Haloid salts of silver, acetyline and other chemicals, illustrating his remarks by a number of laboratory experiments in order to show the re-actions of the various substances. Mr. H.V. Lawes, who was present at the invitation of the president, briefly addressed the members, after which the proceedings terminated.



24th August 1899  Page 22 - The Australasian Photographic Review

A meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held at the rooms, 178 Collins-street, Melbourne, on July 27th, at which there was a very large attendance, the spacious room being packed. Mr. H.H. Baker (Messrs. Wm. Watson and Sons), in a lecture related the history of animated photography and described the working of the various forms of apparatus used in this branch, also the different operations pertaining to the production of cinematograph film positives for projection on the screen. A number of animated pictures was shown, and in the intervals, whilst these scenes were being changed, lantern slides made by members of the association were exhibited. The meeting held on August 8th was for conversation only. Mr. Newman showed some carbon prints. The prospectus of the forthcoming exhibition of the Photographic Society of New South Wales was laid on the table, as were also copies of the report on the late exhibition of the Wellington Camera Club. The Bill to amend the Poisons Act, which is now before Parliament, was given consideration, and it was decided to leave the matter in the hands of the council to take any action which might be necessary in order to endeavor to conserve the interests of members.



21st September 1899  Page 26 - The Australasian Photographic Review

A meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on Tuesday 24th August, at the rooms; Mr. C.W. Watts presided. After the conclusion of the routine business, members proceeded to inspect the hand-cameras that had been brought up. Cameras were shown and described by Messrs. Aitken, Gillespie, Miscamble, Purton, and other members; that shown by Mr. Purton being a very interesting example. It was devised and made by himself about sixteen years ago, when the hand-camera had just been introduced. It is a magazine camera, and will hold 24 plates, any size, from half-plate downwards; a detailed description of it was published in the British Journal of Photography in the early part of 1886. This instrument has, of course, been superseded by later forms, which possess the same general advantages with the addition of greater portability. A meeting was held on Tuesday 12th Sept, at the Rooms, 178 Collins Street, when Mr. P. Baracchi F.R.A.S., Government Astronomer, lectured on “The Application of Photography to the Recording of Terrestrial Magnetism and Temperature, and to Astronomy and Meteorology”. There was a very large attendance of members and visitors, the large room being full. Copies of diagrams made by the recording instruments at the Melbourne Observatory were projected on the screen, and photographs of the apparatus used were shown. The lecturer next dealt with meteorology, paying special attention to the photography of clouds, which is now in progress in Melbourne in conjunction with other observatories in different parts of the world. The appliances and methods of working adopted in Melbourne were described, and photographs and models of the apparatus used were shown. The system of adjusting the instruments was also described, and several lots of clouds taken at the two observing stations were projected on the screen, the positives being made in pairs in order to illustrate how the angles are computed from the varying positions of the same parts of the images on the plate. The photography of the sun and sun spots was then introduced; photographs of the solar corona and spots were shown, and the connection of these latter with terrestrial phenomena mentioned. Several photographs of star clusters and nebulae were next exhibited, some of these being from negatives taken at the Sydney Observatory, and the lecture was brought to a close by a description of the methods adopted in lunar photography. Many photographs of the moon taken at the Paris and Melbourne Observatories were thrown on the screen, following which a series of lunar craters and ideal lunar landscapes from Nasmyth’s models was passed through the lantern. At the close of the lecture, Mr. Lloyd Tayler F.R.I.B.A., President of the Royal Victorian Institute of Architects, said that although the laws of the Association prohibited members from according a vote of thanks to Mr. Baracchi, he being a member of the Association, there was nothing to prevent visitors from recording their appreciation, and on behalf of the visitors he desired to tender the lecturer their thanks for the entertaining and instructive lecture with the illustrative slides. Mr. Tayler’s remarks having been agreed to in the usual demonstrative fashion, the lecturer suitably responded, and the meeting terminated.



21st October 1899  Page 25 - The Australasian Photographic Review

At a meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held at the rooms, 178 Collins St., on Thursday 28th September, the Hon.Secretary lectured on the “Jenolan Caves”, the lecture being illustrated by 120 lantern slides taken by himself, comprising scenery on the road to and in the vicinity of the caves and of the underground formations and wonders. The attendance was very large, and at the close of the lecture a vote of thanks was tendered to Mr. Harvey by the visitors, on the motion of Mr. Lloyd Tayler F.R.I.B.A. The general meeting for October was held at the rooms on Tuesday 10th October, Mr. J.H. Mulvaney in the chair. After the ordinary business, the members proceeded to inspect the stereoscopic and other prints that had been brought up. Carbon prints of landscape subjects were shown by Mr. Newman; Mr. Glover and other members showed stereo, prints and transparencies, the Holmes and Magazine stereoscopes being used for viewing them, and a reflecting stereoscope lent by the Hon.Secretary was also on the table.



Wednesday 25th October 1899  Page 8 - Evening News (Sydney NSW)

The annual exhibition of the Photographic Society of New South Wales, which has been thrown open this year to inter colonial competitors, was officially opened at the rooms of the Art Society, 70 Pitt Street, yesterday afternoon, in the presence of a representative attendance. His Honor Judge Docker (President of the Photographic Society of New South Wales), in opening the proceedings, explained that, owing to the unavoidable absence of his Excellency the Governor, Sir James Fairfax had consented to open the exhibition. There was a new departure this year, in as much as the exhibition was open to competitors from the different colonies. Consequently, there was a great increase in exhibitors, New Zealand being especially well represented. It would be found that some of the most valuable prizes had gone beyond the colony. But the society did not grudge these competitors their success. On the contrary, it welcomed them, for what had been lost in prizes had been gained in the comparison which would be drawn with their own work and from the higher standard which had been shown. Sir James Fairfax, in declaring the exhibition open, referred to the fact that the society had been in existence for four years and had held four exhibitions, each of which showed progress. It must be gratifying to see the exhibition so successful. It had been stated that photography was not a fine art, but he was of opinion that in order to produce the best, the operator must have a good idea of art. As an amateur photographer himself and one who had taken a great interest in art, it gave him much pleasure to be present and open the exhibition. Mr. Alfred Allen moved a vote of thanks to Sir James Fairfax, which was conveyed by his Honor Judge Docker. The exhibition of photos, was a very varied one, the entries being very numerous. As it was open to inter colonial competitors, the following societies were represented: Dunedin Photographic Society, Queensland Amateur Photographic Society, South Australian Photographic Association, Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, Wellington Camera Club (New Zealand), Working Men's Photographic Club (Victoria) and the Austral Camera Club, Gulgong Amateur Photographic Society and the Photographic Society representing N.S.W. The judges were Messrs. Henry King, W. M'Leod and J. Brooks Thornley. Some very fine slides were shown and the gems of the exhibition were conceded to be "The Smithy" by Mr. J. A. Higinbotham, Dunedin (N.Z.); "What Is It?" by Mr. R. Porteous, Working Men's College Club (Vic); "Study in Color" a yachting scene, by Mr. H.V. Lawes, Photographic Society of New South Wales; "Flower Study" by Mr. A. Hamilton, Dunedin (N.Z.); and "The Laundress" by Mr. F.A. Joyner, South Australia. The last-named secured the first prize for the best carbon in the show. There was very keen competition in the landscape section.

Following is the list of awards:
Class I. - Landscape: J. Kauffmann (S.A.), "On the Lago Maggiori" 1; J.R. Yorke, "Jamberoo Creek" 2; J. Kauffmann (SA), "Sunset on the Pool" 3; J. Kauffmann (SA), "Fennel in Bloom" H.C.
Class I. - Members Sub-section: James S. Stening, "Noonday" 1; James S. Stening, "E'en Shades", 2; E.T. Davis, "In the Meadow" 3.
Class II. - Seascapes and Clouds: James S. Stening, "An Autumn Evening" 1; C.W. Middleton, "Rain Clouds" 2; A.J. Relph, Working Men's College (Vic.), "In a Flood of Silvery Moonlight" 3; J. Kauffmann (SA), "Sunset on the Indian Ocean" H.C.; F.C. Wills (Q.), "Cloud Study" H.C.
Class III. - Yachting and Shipping: H.V. Lawes, "A Study in Color" 1; James S. Stening, "Our Harbor" 2; T. de C. Lewis, "Leaving Port" 3; C.J. Heron, "Archina". 4.
Class IVa. — Still Life: A. Hamilton, Dunedin, "Roses" 1; A.C. Gifford, Wellington, (N.Z.), "Night Flowering Cactus" 2; A. Hamilton, Dunedin, "Blue Gum" 3.
Class IV. - Members Sub-section: B.T. Davis, "Marman Cochet" 1; L. Roever, "Flora" 2; J.M. Jago, Flower Study 3.
Class IVb. — Animals: L.B. Blackwell. "Bijou" 1; A.C. Gifford, Wellington (N.Z.), "A Local Branch of the Anti-Bot Fly Association" 2; J.M. Jago, "Milking Time" 3.
Class V. - Genre: R. Porteous, Working Men's College (Vic), "What is It?" 1; J.A. Higinbotham, Wellington (N.Z.), "The Smithy" 2 and HC; F.A. Joyner (S.A.), "The Laundress" 3.
Class V. - Members Sub-section: L. Roever, "My Pussy" 1; H.E. Finckh, "Child Study" 2; L. Roever, "Under the Apple Tree" 3.
Class VI.— Architecture: Thos. Marsh, "Interior of St. Andrew's" 1; L.B. Blackwell",Hursley Church" 2; Thos Marsh, "Interior of Town Hall" 3.
Class VII. - Hand Camera: R.E. Fletcher, Dunedin, "Set Snapshots" 1; T. de C. Lewis, "A Day's Outing" 2; A.W. Pigott (Q.), "Set Snapshots" 3.
Class VII. - Members Sub-section: T. de C. Lewis, "A Days Outing" 1; J.M. Jago, "Snapshots" 2; T. Marsh. "Snapshots" 3.
Class IX. — Transparancies: C.B. Goslett (Vic), "Flower Study" 1; J.M. Jago, "Near Burragorang" 2; L. Roever, "Circular Quay" 3.
Class X. - Stereoscopic: Thos Marsh, "Stereograms" 1; W. Williams (Dunedin), "Stereograms" 2; His Honor Judge Docker, "Stereograms" 3.
Class XI. — Best Bichromatic Print in the Exhibition - F.A. Joyner, South Australian Photographic Association, "The Laundres".
Class XII. - Illustrative of Happiness: J.M. Jago, "Happiness" 1; L. Roever, "Children's Happy Days" 2: H.E. Finckh, "You Can't Catch Me", 3.

Lantern slides and best collection of members work are still to be judged.




21st November 1899  Page 27 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA

On the 26th October a Ladies Social was held at the Vienna Cafe, Collins-street, at which there was a very large attendance. The time was devoted to conversation, music, recitations, and the exhibition of lantern slides. Slides illustrating the ascent of Mont Rosa were described by Mr. James Aebi, and a set illustrative of the scenery and life of Japan was shown. A meeting was held at the rooms on Tuesday 14th November. Two members were elected, and general photographic conversation occupied the time of the members.



22nd January 1900  Page 27 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
The Closing Meeting of the Year 1899 was held at the Rooms, on Tuesday 11th December. After the preliminary business, it was decided that, as the date fixed for the second December meeting came so close to the holidays, the meeting should be struck out. A paper on Halation, by Messrs. C.F. Clough, and J.H. Harvey, was read. The history of the subject was dealt with and the various causes of the phenomenon, as given by many authorities, were chronicled, and the numerous remedies that have been prescribed, from time to time, were given. The results of numbers of experiments were likewise detailed, and the subject generally was exhaustively treated. The discussion that ensued was very interesting, and resulted in the proceedings being protracted to an unusual extent.



21st March 1900  Page 25 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
The opening meeting of the year 1900 was held on Tuesday 13th inst., and as is customary, took the form of a smoke social. The musical portion of the programme was contributed to by Messrs. Wilmot, Coffey, Ferguson and Creswell, and Mr. Lee gave a recitation. A collection of lantern slides was also shown; these consisted of photographs illustrating the departure of the first and second Victorian contingents for South Africa, a number of views recently made in Pompeii, and numerous views of English rural scenery.

A meeting was held on Thursday 22nd February, at which, after some business matters had been dealt with, Mr. H.H. Baker (Wm. Watson & Sons) exhibited and described the “Kromaz”. Several transparencies in stereoscopic form of flowers and other colored objects were shown to illustrate the power of the instrument in building up colors from the superimposed images obtained by means of the color screens.




Monday 2nd April 1900  Page 6 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)
Thursday 5th April 1900  Page 8 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The annual meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held last week, at Fulong's rooms, Royal Arcade, Mr. H.J. Trowbridge in the chair. The report of the council and balance-sheet were read and adopted. The following office-bearers were returned unopposed: President, Mr. H.J. Trowbridge; vice-presidents, Mr. J.H. Mulvaney and Mr. F.A. Kernot; Hon.Treasurer, Mr. E.R. Byrne; Hon.Custodian, Mr. H.C. Ward; Hon.Librarian, J. Glover; Hon.Secretary, Mr. F.W. Miscamble. The ballot for council resulted in the following members being elected: Messrs. J. Glover, J.T. Stephens, J.H. Harvey, H.C. Mais, W.E. Evans, William Aitken, E. Newman, C.B. Goslett. Votes of thanks were accorded to the retiring officers, Messrs. E.W. Purton and J.H. Harvey.



23rd April 1900  Page 23 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
SECRETARY’S REPORT for the Year 1899-1900
The history of the Association for the year just completed has on the whole been, very similar to that of previous years, the only material change in the proceedings having been the introduction of Ladies Socials, which had never previously been a feature of the Society.

The removal from the Royal Society’s Rooms to more central and convenient quarters in Collins Street, resulted in improved attendances, the members evidently appreciating the new position; it is, however, to be regretted that twelve months after we had become settled in the new rooms, we were compelled to vacate them in consequence of the expiration of the lease under which the premises were held by the original tenants (this Association having been a sub-tenant). This could not be renewed except on such terms as the original tenants could not comply with, and the consequence was that the Association was compelled to withdraw. Considerable time was expended by one or two members of the Council in endeavoring to find suitable rooms elsewhere for the holding of meetings, but the difficulty of obtaining these at a rental such as would be within the Society’s means was very great; eventually, on the authority of a meeting held on the 13th March 1900, an arrangement was entered into with Mr. W.R. Furlong, under which the Association has the right to use his rooms in the Royal Arcade for meeting purposes until 31st March 1901, at the same rental as was paid for the Collins Street premises.

The uncertainty of obtaining suitable quarters compelled the Council to temporary abandon the idea of holding the exhibition of members work which was contemplated; this, however, may possibly be arranged for by the incoming Council. During the year, 21 meetings have been held, and the time occupied as follows:

1. An inaugural address on “Photography Past and Present” was delivered by Mr. C. W. Watts, the President.
2. A demonstration of a method of obtaining prints of a warm tone on Bromide Paper by simple “development” was given by the Hon.Secretary.
3. An exhibition and description of the “Eilford Oxygen Generator” was given by Mr. H.J. Trowbridge.
4. A paper on the “Chemistry of Photography” (with demonstrations) was read by Mr. A.J. Hart.
5. A lecture on an exhibition of the “Kinematograph” by Mr. H.H. Baker.
6. An exhibition and description of “Hand Cameras” by various members.
7. A paper on “Dark-Room Illumination” by Mr. H.J. Trowbridge and the Hon.Secretary.
8. A paper on “Halation” by Mr. C.F. Clough, M.J.C. and the Hon.Secretary.
9. A description and exhibition of the “Kromaz” by Mr. H.H. Baker.
10. A lecture on “The Application of Photography to Astronomy, Terrestrial Magnetism and Meteorology” with lantern slides, was delivered by Mr. P. Baracchi, F.R.A.S.
11. A lantern lecture on the “Jenolan Caves” by the Hon.Secretary.

In addition to the above, there was one Smoke Social and two Ladies Socials, and six evenings were devoted to conversation and the exhibition of prints by members.

The remaining night is occupied by the Annual Meeting.

A new feature to which slight reference has already been made was introduced into the proceedings of the Association during the year, and that was the introduction of Social Meetings to which members could bring their lady friends. On these occasions, music, recitations, and lantern exhibitions filled up the time. These meetings were very popular there having been very large attendances on both occasions.

Steps have been taken during the year to procure sets of slides; the work of members to forward to the Photo. Club, Algiers, and the Kimberley Camera Club. These slides are now available, and will be forwarded on the receipt of further details from the Algiers Club, to which it was decided to send the lot in consequence of the unsettled state of affairs in South Africa.

The attention of members has again to be drawn to the necessity that exists for the recognition of the fact that the Association is not a school of photography with the members of the Council as honorary instructors, but that every member is expected to take up his share of the burden, and by so doing and showing that he has a practical interest in the Institution; each man will support the other, and the Society by this means will become a strong organization.

The dictum laid down in the Report for 1897-8, still holds good, the existing conditions and those of that year being identical. It is utterly impossible to keep the Association going as a live institution unless all members throw their energy into its work. A large members roll is perhaps a very good thing, but it will always be found that it is not in mere numbers, but in the percentage of workers that the real strength lies, and that a comparatively small society every member of which is a worker will in the end wield greater influence than a larger body in which the same individual energy is not evident. In conclusion, the Council desires to thank those members who have assisted in the work of the year by reading papers, delivering lectures, or conducting demonstrations. It has also to thank Mr. Alex Gunn for the gift of one of his improved retorts for oxygen making, and now expresses the wish that the general body of members will rally round the new Council, and make the carrying out of a satisfactory program during the coming year an easy matter.

J.H. HARVEY
Hon.Secretary




23rd April 1900  Page 24 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
The Annual Meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held at the new rooms in the Royal Arcade on Wednesday 28th March 1900. Mr. H.J. Trowbridge in the chair. There was a fair attendance of members present. The Hon. Treasurer pointed out that the balance-cash in hand of £11 15s. 10d. was earmarked for outstanding accounts of £10 14s. 3d., and that the heavy outlay for Socials was responsible for the small credit available to start the new year with.

The following Officers and Council were elected for the ensuing year: President, Mr. H.J. Trowbridge; Vice-President, Messrs. J.H. Mulraney and E.A. Kermot; Hon. Treasurer, Mr. E.K. Byrns; Hon. Custodian of Apparatus, Mr. H.C. Ward; Hon. Librarian, Mr. J. Glover; Hon.Secretary, Mr. F.W. Miscamble, J.J.A., Victoria. All the foregoing officers were returned unopposed. The ballot for councilors resulted in the following members being elected; Messrs. J. Glover, J.H. Harvey, H.C. Mais, W.E. Evans, Win. Aitken, E. Newman, and C.B. Goslett.

Hearty and special votes and thanks were enthusiastically accorded to Mr. E. Burton, late Hon. Custodian, and Mr. J.H. Harvey, late Hon.Secretary for their valuable and long continued services to the Association. In responding both recipients thanked the members for acknowledging their services, and admitted that “new blood” was desirable in all progressive institutions, and they would still render the Association any assistance that laid in their power. Mr. Harvey in supporting the vote of thanks to Mr. Burton stated that he and Mr. Burton were the only representatives present of the founders of the Society, and that Mr. Burton was the first one to introduce the limelight to the Colony. At the close of the meeting the Hon.Secretary requested that each member should mark his calendar and diary on the 2nd and 4th Wednesday of each month through the year, as they were now the meeting nights of the Association.




23rd April 1900  Page 29 - The Australasian Photographic Review

A MERITED HONOR
We are pleased to note Mr. H. Trowbridge, of Melbourne, has been elected President of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria. Mr. Trowbridge is at home with the camera — an enthusiast and has a burning love for stereoscopic work.



23rd May 1900  Page 26 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
Mr. Robert W. Harvie, on the 27th April, gave a most instructive paper on Practical Hints and Dodges in Manipulation, and dealt in a concise manner with the following points: The use of the swing back and rising front, tilting the lens when taking high buildings and stopping down, use of the center of illumination, the preference of Iodide of Mercury as an intensifier and Persulphate of Ammonia as a reducer, in enlarging, the advantages of an overhead set of rails for a movable easel and the insertion of a small ground glass square flush with the surface of such easel for focusing, and the use of flashed opal for the better illumination of the negative, omission of preliminary soaking of bromide paper, the result, justifying the extra amount of developer required, the use of brush and black paint upon the bromide paper in blocking out when making composite prints, method of centering prints when mounting, Pyro and Soda was the best developer for all negatives, not excepting those taken at the highest speed of the focal plane shutter, backed plates always gave better results and did not affect the speed of the same, backing recommended, burnt sienna pulp and caramel. The lecturer illustrated all the points with samples, and at the conclusion of the paper the members entered into a very interesting series of discussions as to their several experiences in the, methods and results before referred to. Mr. H.J. Trowbridge, President, was chairman. Four new members were elected.



21st June 1900  Page 27 - The Australasian Photographic Review

The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria held a Meeting at their Rooms, Furlong’s Music Hall, on June 13th, Mr. F.A. Kernot in the Chair, and after some routine business was got through, and eight new members were elected, a most interesting lecture was given by Dr. William R. Fox L.R.C.S., L.R.C.P., on “The History of X rays - their Origin and Uses”.

The history of the X rays was traced from their discovery over 20 years ago, by Hittorf, up to the present time. The lecture was practically demonstrated throughout, and at its conclusion a number of interesting experiments were shewn.

The liquid in an unopened stone bottle of ink, and some mercury also in a stone bottle, were clearly shewn by the aid of the screen, as well as a number of instruments inside their cases.

Some instruments in a thick oak case were visible not only through the case, but also through the whole thickness of the human body as well.

A door key was seen through the head, and brooches, and scarf pins through the chest of the wearer. The pulsations of the heart, and the lungs filling with air at each breath, were plainly visible on the screen. A set of knives inside a metal case was shown very distinctly indeed. The Wehnelt interrupter was used with great effect, and produced a flame several inches in length. The Geisslers tubes were of special interest owing to their brilliant coloring, and one of them showing the words “God save the Queen” evoked a round of applause and the singing of the National Anthem. At the close of the demonstration several radiographs were taken of the hands of the Hon. Treasurer and the Hon.Secretary of the Society.

There were about 200 members and friends present, and Messrs. A. and L. Goodwin assisted Dr. Fox with the instruments. The lecturer, who was warmly received, was accorded a hearty vote of thanks, which concluded a most instructive evening.




Thursday 28th June 1900  Page 4 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

For the first time in Australia a demonstration of photographic color projection was given last night in connection with the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria. Mr. J. Patterson, who was assisted Mr. R. Harvie, explained from both the theoretical and practical points of view the system, which is the result of 20 years work by Mr. Frederick Ives, an American photographer. The effects are obtained by an ingenious arrangement of colored light "filters" and reflectors inside the camera and it is necessary to take three separate pictures in the three fundamental primary colors. Some of the work shown by Mr. Patterson, as the result of his work during the last four years in conjunction with Mr. Harvie, was most interesting as illustrating the realistic degree to which color photography has been brought.



21st July 1900  Page 24 - The Australasian Photographic Review

Mr. J. Patterson, of Messrs Patterson and Shugg, assisted by Mr. Robert Harvie, at the general meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, held at its rooms on 27th June, demonstrated in the most practical manner the wonderful perfection to which photography in natural colors has been brought.

The lecturer took his audience through the various stages of discovery, commencing with the theories of color vision of Young (1802) and Helmholtz and Maxwell (1853-61) when the first experiments in color photography were demonstrated. The work of Frederick Ives, of America, during the last 20 years having brought color photography to a state of perfection almost impossible to improve upon.

The three transparencies used are secured by photographing any colored object through red, green, and violet glasses, thus dividing the reflected rays into three primaries of light. The pictures are then projected by the use of a triple lantern, placing similarly colored filtering glasses in front of each transparency. The effect of the superimposing is identically that of the original coloring.

Slides of fruits, flowers, vases, and lollies of variegated colors were shown on the screen with marvelous accuracy, each slide evoking a round of applause. Copies of those made by Ives, and several original studies by the lecturer were exhibited. The camera used by Ives was described, and also one of a much simpler form, invented by the lecturer, now making this branch of photography within the reach of the amateur. Many samples of very beautiful effects, obtained by the color process with the ordinary printing machine were also shown during an interval.

There was a very large attendance of the members and friends, many of whom were acquainted with the theory of the subject, but all quite unprepared for the unqualified success of the demonstration. Mr. F.A. Kernot was chairman. A very hearty vote of thanks was passed to the lecturer with acclamation, who in responding said it gave him great pleasure to place before the Association the results of four years work at his hobby, and if he had stimulated thought in the same direction in the minds of his audience, he was amply repaid for his efforts that evening. Three new members were elected.




21st August 1900  Page 24 - The Australasian Photographic Review

SYNOPSIS OF A LECTURE BY E. NORTON GRIMWADE
GIVEN BEFORE THE

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
In deference to wish of the Hon.Secretary, views - were limited to Berlin, Potdsam and the Rhine and home by the United States and Honolulu.

Opening pictures showed the Orient Company’s “Omrah” getting away from Port Melbourne.

First picture in Berlin was the Palace of the present Emperor, then same building showing part of the handsome Palace bridge over the arm of the Spree. Views followed of the old museum opposite, and traveling westwards along the Grand Unter den Luiden were shown the grand bronze monument to Frederick the Great, one of the finest in Europe, and rising 44 feet in height; captured French guns from Fort Valerien, near Paris, and the Brandenburg Gate at western end of this great and beautiful thoroughfare. Passing through this gate the beautiful Thiergarten is entered, and upon the right stands the great monument of Victory, which showed clearly its adornment of captured French, Danish, and Austrian cannon. About two miles beyond, the suburb of Charlottenburg is reached, pictures of the palace and Mausoleum being shown. In the latter rests the bodies of the Queen Louise, her husband Emperor Frederick William III., their second son, William I., and Empress Augusta. Their tombs being covered by the most exquisite white marble recumbent figures. From Berlin, we journeyed to Potdsam: first picture being the old Royal Palace, taken from bridge over the Havel, then followed the Town Hall, the new Palace where the present Empress was then in residence. Especially interesting were views of the historic Palace of Sans Souci, where Emperor Frederick the Great lived and died, and a concluding view of the Garrison Church which holds his remains. Several views of the Rhine from Mainz to Cologne then followed, when a picture of the “Dunwottar Castle” was given at Southampton, leaving 14th October last year with Sir Redvers Buller for the Cape, as the lecturer was leaving that Port for New York. The first New York picture was the tomb of General Ulysses Grant, upon banks of the River Hudson. Then followed views of Dewey Arch, 5th Avenue, Elevated Railway, Brooklyn Suspension Bridge, and Harlem Speedway. Views then were given in Washington, D.C., including the Capital, the Congressional Library, the house given by the Nation to Dewey, White House, the house of the President, and the house of the Leiters, where the present Lady Curzon lived, wife of Viceroy of India. Next Niagara was visited and several good views shown, and a scene in Rocky Mountains concluded America. Views at Honolulu and ship board scenes finishing with passing of the Sydney heads concluded the lecture.

Colored slides were shown by Messrs Trowbridge and Evans, illustrating the departing Contingent to South Africa; by Mr. E.K. Byrne, showing the excavations and the Collingwood Railway Line; by Mr. Madden, illustrating scenes in the old world, and by Dr. Bull, slides showing forked lightning.




21st August 1900  Page 26 - The Australasian Photographic Review

PHOTOGRAPHIC LENSES
Papers read before the
AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
Messrs. A.W. CRAVEN M.L.A., and J.H. HARVEY.


The subject was dealt with in an exhaustive manner, the defects of curvature of field and astigmatism, (particularly the latter), having been specially enlarged upon. The use of stops, and the refraction and dispersion of light, by means of prisms of various forms and densities, were also described in a lucid manner, as well as the methods adopted for rendering lenses achromatic, and the steps that have been taken to reduce the extent of the secondary spectrum. The composition and manufacture of optical glass was next treated upon, and the history of the Jena glass and of its incorporation in lenses for photographic purposes was given. Then followed a technical description of the principal makes of lenses which have been brought out since the introduction of the Jena glass; these included the Concentric, the Zeiss and Goerz anastigmats, the Collinear, the Cooke, the Orthostigmat, the Stigmatic, the Planor and others.

The great value of sets of lenses or “casket lenses” now claimed attention, and the paper gave a history of these from the earliest days of photography, together with a description of the construction of some of the earliest sets. As the paper was read, it was illustrated by about 50 diagrams, which were projected on the screen, and in order to show the value of lenses of varying focal lengths, and the convenience of “casket lenses”, lantern slides of a scene well known to all the members were used. The scene chosen embraced portion of the Flinders Street Railway Station, Prince’s Bridge, and the Paper Mills, and other Yarra bank structures, and from the same stand point several exposures were made on this view, using lenses of different focal lengths without moving the camera, and the advantage of using a long focus lens wherever possible, was shewn by the photographing of a definite object in the view, viz. Prince’s Bridge, with a long focus lens, and then obtaining an image of it of the same size, with a lens of shorter focus, the latter not showing the bridge at all to advantage, at the same time, the value of short focus lenses of great covering power wide angle lenses, for the obtaining of views in confined situations was pointed out. Each of the above cases was illustrated by a lantern slide of the same subject (Prince’s Bridge).

A plan of the locality of the scene depicted was then projected on the screen. The positions from winch all the above described negatives had been taken, were clearly indicated on this plan, and the angle of view which each lens included, having been measured by means of the theodolite, was also shown on the plan, by lines drawn from the station point, and the plan had a table attached showing the extent of each of the angles together with the focal length of the lens, with which each negative including such angle had been taken. Eight of these negatives were made with the lenses composing one of Voigtlanders Collinear sets, while others were taken with one of Dallmeyer’s single lenses of a very long focus.


Mr. J.H. HARVEY


A.W. CRAVEN

Born 1855 Yorkshire, England
Died Friday 28th November 1913 Moonee Ponds, Victoria




Monday 27th August 1900  Page 9 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The members and friends of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria spent a very pleasant evening at the Port Phillip Club Hotel, on Wednesday, when they held their annual smoke night, there being about 150 persons present. Among the artists who assisted were Signer Boffard and Messrs. Furlong, Elder, Norcott, Lee and others.



25th September 1900  Page 27 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
THREE COLOR PRINTING

At the meeting held on August 8th, Mr. J. Pettigrew lectured and demonstrated the latest advancements in three color printing. The syllabus title of the Lecture was “My Failures in Three Color Printing” and these were related with full detail proving highly instructive as well as, at times, very amusing. The Lecturer, who had communicated with Ives of America respecting the early experiments, demonstrated the uses of the Levy screen, Penrose’s Patent Plate and Screen Holder, Light Filters, Inks, etc., and showed many beautiful specimens of English and Colonial work. He advised his hearers, as Amateurs, not to attempt the process and stated that, in his opinion, it was not yet a commercial success. At the close of the Lecture Mr. Pettigrew exhibited several transparencies through the “Kromskop” in their natural colors.

SMOKE SOCIAL
AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
PRESENTATION TO E.W. PURTON ESQ.


The Second Meeting of the month 26th August, took the form of a Smoke Social and a varied program was put through. The night was, fortunately, a wet one (as regards the weather is meant) otherwise there would not have been sufficient accommodation. Lantern Slides by Messrs Aitken (Yachting), Dr. Bull (Forked Lightning), Madden (European Scenes), Mais (Humorous Sketches) and Wallis (Art Studies) were shown — also those illustrating the songs “The Village Blacksmith” and “Father O’ Flynn”, sung by Mr. W.R. Furlong, and “The Death of Nelson” sung by Mr. Turner.

Mons Boffard, Will Elder, Egan Lee, Norcott, Paterson and Thompson contributed, and the Edison Concert Phonograph manipulated by Messrs. Evans and Muirhead surprised many by its wonderful clearness of tone, which was brought about by the Spun bell attachment, a brass trumpet in appearance, measuring some 4 or 5 feet in length, and about 2 1/2 feet at the orifice.

The main attraction of the evening to the members, was the presentation to Mr. E.W. Purton who had been Honorary Custodian for the last seventeen years. The gift consisted of a diamond stud and scarf pin in a case with a suitable inscription attached, The Chairman, Mr. F.A. Kernot, Vice President, made the presentation, and the portrait of the recipient was projected upon the screen, while the members sang “For he’s a jolly good fellow”. Mr. Purton in thanking the members said he thought it right to retire in order that others might bear the burden of office, although with him it had always been a labor of love. He congratulated the Association in securing Mr. H.C. Ward as their custodian, as he had rendered him valuable assistance in the past in connection with the Lantern work.

The members and their friends to the number of 120 separated at a late hour, after spending a very pleasant evening. Mr. W.R. Furlong acted as accompanist.




22nd October 1900  Page 27 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
At the General Meeting, held 12th September, members were requested to bring prints for criticism, and to exchange experiences among each other by means of asking and answering questions upon methods and practice, and by short papers or lectures (not exceeding 15 minutes in duration) upon matters of photographic interest.

With the exception of Messrs. Robert W. Harvie and C.B. Goslett, who exhibited bromide prints and transparencies mounted on cut out mounts, each respectively, all came fully prepared to criticize.

At the close of the criticisms, the President, Mr. H.J. Trowbridge, related his experiences in Sydney during his lengthened absence from the chair, and it was resolved:
(1) “That a letter be written to the Photographic Society of New South Wales thanking the members for the reception they had given the President of this Association, and the many kindnesses they had extended towards him”.
(2) “That this association offer a loan of fifty slides (lantern) to the Photographic Society of New South Wales”.

Discussion then became general as to the plans and prospects of the exhibition of member’s work, to be held on 23rd and 24th November next.

At the second meeting of the month (26th), Mr. E. Norton Grimwade, exhibited a 20 feet oxygen bottle of the Scotch and Irish Oxygen Company, with an excellent pressure gauge attached, and with the gas turned, the needle at once indicated a pressure per sq. in. of lbs., or atmospheres or contents of 17 cubic feet. The pressure gauge was taken off, and Briers automatic regulator attached. Connections were made from this for limelight, and gas turned on full. The regulator worked silently, and as evenly as a gasometer delivering the gas at a pressure of about 2 lbs. from the enormous pressure of 1700.

Mr. Grimwade then referred to the care and skill used in making and testing of bottles. Many explosions had happened, notably the following: When Mr. Asquith, Sec. State, had a Departmental Committee appointed, consisting of Prof. Unwin, Prof. Bowes, Prof. Dickson, Dr. Du Pre, and the Rev. S.J. Smith, to obtain “The best possible scientific advice as to risks attending the filling of cylinders containing compressed oxygen gas”.

List of explosions: Mixed gas, Dublin 1886, one killed; Nitrous Oxide, Liverpool, 1886, one killed; Oxygen cylinder, Glasgow, one person killed; Hydrogen cylinder, Brandford explosion in 1893; Carbonic, in India 1825; Ammonia cylinder on s.s. “Highland Chief”, 1891, one person killed; Carbonic acid, Eotter dam, 1895, one killed; Carbonic acid, Antwerp, 1892, one killed; Carbonic acid, s.s. “Highland Glen”, 1893, two killed; Fenchurch Street explosion, 1895, one killed.

The cause of above were considered. Fenchurch Street, due to mixture of gas by error in filling, and then ignition taking place through:
(a) presence of oil or grease in cylinder;
(b) rapid oxidization of particles of iron. 1 lb. mixture of oxygen and coal gas in 20 ft. cylinder developed same energy as lb. gunpowder.

Much very interesting expert evidence was taken before this committee. Mr. Henry Brier of the Scoth and Irish Oxygen Company Ltd., Glasgow, was examined in detail, and amongst much evidence the following facts are especially interesting to us. His company manufacture and compress oxygen, hydrogen, carbonic acid and nitrous oxide. Cylinders used, mostly solid drawn and all of steel. Have oxygen cylinders working up to a pressure of 9.29 tons per square inch. Ordinary cylinders tested to 3860 lbs per square inch, now being made five-sixteenths inch thick. Steel used is best mild, not more than 32 tons tensile strength, or less than 26, and not more than 0.25 per cent, of carbon. On one occasion rejected 1000 new cylinders, because the first 20 were not to the specification.

Cylinders re-annealed every 4 or 5 years. Has tested a cylinder containing oxygen at 1800 lbs. pressure with a falling weight of 6 1/4 cwt. dropped from a height of 35 feet, flattening cylinder about one inch, and again a cylinder of oxygen at 750 lbs. pressure has been flattened.

To distinguish gases, right handed screw fittings painted black for oxygen, and left handed screw painted red for hydrogen. Has refused business from small men who for reasons of economy disregard these precautions. Messrs. Feiton, Grimwade & Co., are using entirely these cylinders, and are not prepared to fill unknown cylinders to high pressures. Whilst users must much appreciate the use of compressed gas, it behoves them to see that they do not get cylinders without practically any character.

Messrs. Kernot and Goslett exhibited slides. On Wednesday, 10th October, Mr. Arthur J. Relph, Hon.Secretary of the Working Men's College Photographic Club, delivered a very interesting and instructive paper upon “The Victorian Grampians” and by the means of about 100 lantern slides showed a class of scenery that many members had traveled hundreds of miles outside the colony to see, and photograph. All present expressed themselves freely, as to the surprise they got in seeing such rugged and impressive mountain scenery, and also in now knowing that this was accessible to the ordinary amateur.

The Chairman, Mr. F.A. Kernot in moving a vote of thanks to the lecturer, said they were all indebted to Mr. Relph, in bringing before them such beautiful views, and it was evident there was no need for several days traveling to obtain the finest views of mountains, precipices, waterfalls, rocks, crevasses and mountain formations, that one could wish for. He hoped that Mr. Relph would repeat this lecture again and again. He was glad to thank the lecturer, who was officially representing a kindred society, and thereby taking part in the syllabus of this association.

Mr. Mulvaney, Vice-President, seconded the motion, which was carried with acclamation. Mr. Relph in responding, said that he was glad to have had the opportunity of assisting in the syllabus of the parent association, and that his views had been appreciated, many of them being taken under very exceptional circumstances. When his leisure would permit him, he would like to become a member again of this association, and with regard to the next syllabus he hoped that several members of both societies should mutually take part in each other's programs. He was pleased to know that Mr. F.W. Miscamble, the Hon.Secretary had reciprocated, and been included in this year's syllabus of his (the lecturer’s) club.




Saturday 24th November 1900  Page 12 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The eighth exhibition of the work of members of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, which was opened in Furlong's Studios, Royal Arcade, last evening, by the Mayor of Melbourne (Councillor Gillott) was an unqualified success. There were exhibits of every known process in photographyand of all its branches, including portraiture, landscape, marine, animaland architectural studies, many of the exhibits resembling engravings so closely as to deceive all but the expert eye. There were several excellent radiographsand Dr. Clendinnen showed some very fine photomicrographs. Some of the best exhibits, in addition to those already mentioned, were Mr. D.W. Paterson's autotypes, Mr. E.K. Byrne's "Retreat at the Jenolan Caves", Mr. J.H. Harvey's "Views in Parliament house", which were hung at the Indian and Colonial Exhibition, Mr. F. Purton's micrographsand Mr. H.B. Clutten's moonlight study at St. Kilda. The exhibition will be open again this evening.


SIR SAMUEL GILLOTT

Born 29 October 1838 Sheffield, United Kingdom
Died 29 June 1913 (aged 74) Sheffield, United Kingdom


47th MAYOR of MELBOURNE 1900 - 1902




22nd December 1900  Page 23 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
At the General Meeting hold on October 24th, the chair was taken by Mr. F.A. Kernot, who intimated that the outing on Prince of Wales Birthday, would be of an unofficial character, and that the Heidelberg had been suggested as a rendezvous.

A member expressed the opinion that some award of merit should be given to the exhibitors of the best pictures at the forth-coming exhibition, as he believed it would be an inducement to many to exhibit. The Chairman, in reply, stated that this question had been considered by the Exhibition Committee, and it was thought inadvisable to have competitions or prizes; the matter then dropped.

SPECIAL BUSINESS
Mr. R. Fergerson read a paper upon the Acetylene Gaslight, showing by means of diagrams the working of the generators. He also exhibited a reading light of good power, and applied the gas to the Optical Lantern. By this latter means about 100 lantern slides were shown upon the screen, several slides were in pairs, colored and uncolored, the light rendering the latter with greater fidelity as to color values than with other illuminants. Some particularly dense slides were shown to test the power of the light, and better results were obtained than with the ordinary lime-light.

Mr. J.M. Alvares was elected a member. The members of the Association had an outing on October 31st, to the Melbourne Observatory, and were shown over the various rooms and buildings, inspecting the many astronomical and recording instruments by the aid of the Astraphotographical Observer, Mr. Wallace. The Moon, Jupiter, Saturn with ring plainly visible, and the Twin Stars were seen through the telescopes. A vote of thanks to Mr. Wallace concluded a most instructive and enjoyable outing.

The General Meeting on November 14th, was presided over by the President, Mr. H.J. Trowbridge. Dr. Frederick J. Clendinnen was elected a member, this election being that of the twentieth new member since the last annual meeting. A letter from the Photographic Society of New South Wales was read, thanking the Association for the set of slides offered to the Society as a loan, and informing the Association of the Society’s intention to reciprocate after the inter-colonial Exhibition had been held in April next. Also an application to the Editor of the Amateur Photographer for a loan of the A.P. 1899 set, for circulation throughout the Colonies. It was decided to test and choose the Lantern slides for the loan set at the General Meeting, to be held on December 12th. Mr. W.E. Evans gave a very interesting lecture upon the Focal Plane Shutter, its construction and working being clearly explained. Several prints depicting sensational incidents, such as horses and their riders falling over at the fences on steeplechase day was shown. The method of obtaining three pictures on one plate, by three distinct exposures was explained, and some excellent results were exhibited.

EXHIBITION OF MEMBERS WORK
After a lapse of seven years, this Association gave a two days show of its members work at its rooms. The Mayor of Melbourne, the Hon. Samuel Gillott, M.L.A , opened the Exhibition on Friday 23rd November, and in doing so dealt with the subject of Amateur Photography in a very interesting manner, he having been the victim on many occasions of the snapshotter. He believed that amateur photography was a health giving pastime, and was a hobby worthy of cultivation, because of its not altogether selfish nature. He alluded to the value of recording the beauties of nature, and also to the immense value to science generally, and to medicine in particular, which the photographic plate had rendered in conjunction with the X rays.

The President, Mr. H.J. Trowbridge, in proposing a vote of thanks to the Mayor, touched upon the various phases and vicissitudes of photography, from Daguerre to the village photographer of the present day, and then dwelt upon the advantages of the amateur photographer associating himself with those of like interests. The Association was indebted to the Mayor for his presence at the opening of the Exhibition. The vote was carried with acclamation. The Mayor in responding, said he was glad to be of service to an Association with such worthy objects, and he wished it every success. He would be glad to be of assistance in the future should they require him. Some seven or eight hundred friends of the members visited the Exhibition, which was a good attendance considering the hot weather. There were about 165 framed, and some 45 unframed exhibits, sent in by 30 of the members, covering upwards of 700 square feet of wall space.

The following members exhibited: Messrs Trowbridge, Ferriera, Newman, R.W. Harvie, Clutten, Aitken, Paterson, Mulvany, Byrne, Pettigrew, Goslett, Ward, Purton, J.H. Harvey, Fitts, J. Temple Stephens, Henderson, F.L. Baker, J.C. Stephens, Watts, Gillespie, Dr. Clendinnen, Madden, Kernot, Glover, Owen, Kett, Dr. Fox, Miscamble, “Zero” and “Handy Camera”. The work was of a very high order of merit, and those able to express an opinion stated freely that there was a very general excellence, the average being much higher than that of former exhibitions held by the Association.

“No, Sir, you only court failure if you do not award prizes showing the order of merit", but we did not, and yet we succeeded. One with an envious mind should not visit an exhibition. The model for that study, the sky of that seascape, seem to make one wish for more time, more money, and, perhaps, shall I say, more brains. It is not all who can succeed, as he of the order genius, and if one is envious then, stay away. If, on the other hand, one is of ambitious mind, and owns a large stock of patience, and of the order that is called "grit”, then the exhibition will be an incentive, will contain germs of inspiration, and will result in nothing but good to him whose soul is above the beer and skittles of life.

The Artistic side of photography was greatly in evidence at the Exhibition. Only a few, certainly not 10 per cent, of the collection were records pure and simple. All the members seemed imbued with the idea, and a right one too I claim, of regarding photography as a means to an end — that the lens which gives microscopic detail of chimneys “miles away”, is of great utility, but that photographs which render such detail are not necessarily pictures, and that such photographs are becoming less and less in evidence at every exhibition. Of course, Mr. Detail claims that Mr. Fuzzy is not necessarily artistic, and with him I agree. Between the two there is an immensity of space.

The portrait photograph with subject or subjects, staring right square in your eyes is also fast disappearing, thank goodness. “This is a house” style has also gone far, far away. There were less than a score of genre studies, but those that were admired so much would be hard to beat. It seemed very hard to select, and perhaps impossible to place in the order of merit the pictures that were hung.

I will not attempt to absolutely say this is the order in which they must appear, and here I must remark that as the names of exhibitors, and titles of subjects were optional, it is difficult at times to remember whose work it was that captivated the eye, and satisfied one’s artistic sense. The great bulk of the exhibitors, a long way over 90 per cent., showed their generosity in not disclosing their names. Carbon work was well represented. All the silver prints, excepting some ancient specimens of recording value only, were correctly toned and mounted and with but an exception showed artistic skill on the part of the maker of the negative. A large frame of some two dozen opals of the ever-fascinating snapshots, was the only exhibit illustrating that class of work, and one frame of Microscopic photography. Certain of our members are well known in London, and it was not surprising to see the crowds that gathered round their work, and let me whisper it, they were pleased with the show!

In one of the bays there were two studies each showing conception and delicacy in handling, one a Bromide enlargement by Trowbridge entitled “Mary”. This was an art picture, and would rank well anywhere. The other was called “Dominoes”, by Kernot, a subject well handled, but dangerous to the unskilful on account of the temptation to over elaborate the detail. The natural posing of the players showed that he had sympathetic models. Very close to this was a study in Carbon, of the nude, and here again the model was all important, and yet not nearly so as the posing. The name of the exhibitor was not disclosed, but he is one of the most prominent of those who make “pictures”. Another very choice production by the same worker, which would be well named as “Contemplation” was also shown, and they were both very graceful studies. Some studies in animal life were shown in autotype, and of these one remembers without effort two dogs heads. The maker of these was not disclosed publicly, but he is also well known. One of the most delightful landscape studies in carbon was entitled “Water pool at Dandenong” (Newman), and a River-scape by Gillespie, with the true river effects, heavy foreground and murky distance engaged much attention. This member also showed an evening scene on the Mordialloc Creek, and this was of the highest excellence both from purely technical and artistic merit. It was a picture and it commanded considerable attention. A picture entitled “The First Snow” (Kernot), was out of the way somewhat, but all loved to look at it, there was true pictorial effect without effort. The Hand Camera worker was well represented and some choice bits of country scenery with life entitled “Friends”, “A Country Road” and “The Haymakers”, (Miscamble) showed what was possible to the earnest worker, these were bromide enlargements, and there were also some seascapes at San Eemo by the same worker.

“A Breezy Day at Mentone” and “Bird’s Nest in Raspberry Bush” (Glover) showed careful execution. There were some very choice studies of flowers by Trowbridge and Goslett, also some silver prints of Game, by the last named gentleman which were greatly admired. “Romeo and Juliet” (Trowbridge), was a Photograph of Statuary, and showed beautiful detail and soft lighting. “The Lesson” and “A Revel in Soap” by Owen, showed broadness of effect and a high ideal, but the manner of naming them spoilt the appearance. There were other pictures by this member which show that he with a few more of the score new members are most valuable acquisitions to the Association.

Some of the other exhibits were as follows:
Stereoscopic Transparencies and prints hy Messrs Ward, J.H. Harvey and Glover.
H.C. Ward supplied a large frame for holding Lantern Slides on table, which was very well patronised.
Frame of Micro Work by E. W. Purton.
Kromskop lent by Mr. Pettigrew, also specimens of three color work in all its stages.
W.E. Evans some really first class focal plane work of Race Finishes, etc.
R.W. Harvey two 15 x 12 Enlargements, perfect gems.
H.B. Cutten four Carbons, one with moon light effect which was simply perfect.
W. Aitken, Yachting Pictures, these were charming little pictures, and worthy of a prominent place in any exhibition.
D.W. Paterson showed a large frame of Carbons, at which work he is a past grand master.
H.J. Trowbridge, Child Studies, “Breaking the News” and “Child and Butterfly”.
J.H. Mulvaney, Frame of Landscape work and enlargements.
E.K. Byrne, two Bromide Enlargements, one the Cave House, Jenolan Caves, being specially good.
J.H. Harvey, Interior of Public Buildings, which were a credit to this careful worker, also a large percentage of the Lantern Slides.
J. Temple Stephens, Toned Bromide Prints and English Scenery.
F.L. Baker, Silver Print, “Mother and Child”.
J.C. Stephens, Bromide Enlargements.
C.W. Watts, Bromide Enlargements, Landscapes from 1/4 plate negatives.
J. T. Gillespie, “On the Yarra”, “Evening Scene on Mordialloc Creek”, probably the two best pictures in the Exhibition, the first named is a perfect gem.
Dr. Glendinnen, showed a large assortment of excellent skiagraphs.
P. Madden, Interior and Landscape work.
Dr. Fox, Skiagraph, “The Unwelcome Tenant”, showing the bullet in Dr. Fraser’s head. In addition to showing the bullet in the brain, a small splinter of lead is also clearly shown.
H. Owen, Church Interiors and Child Studies, one set of which obtained first prize in an English competition against all comers.
F.W. Miscamble, “Friends”, “A Country Road”, two very good examples of Hand Camera work.
F. Ferriera, showed some very good work in Bromide and Silver Printing.



BREAKING THE NEWS
by J.H. TROWBRIDGE




23rd March 1901  Page 27 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
At the general meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, held at its rooms last night, a very interesting paper was read, and demonstration given by the President, Mr. H.J. Trowbridge, of the new printing process “Ozotype”, which the inventor, Mr. Manly, of London, claims to be superior to Carbon printing in ease of working and it is equal in results. The nomination of candidates for office bearers and council were as follows:

President, Mr. F.A. Kernot; Vice-Presidents, Mr. C.B. Goslett, Mr. H.C. Mais; Hon. Treasurer, Mr. E.K. Byrne; Hon. Custodian, Mr. H.C. Ward; Hon. Librarian, Mr. J.H Harvey; Hon.Secretary, Mr. F.W. Miscamble; Councillors, Messrs. H.J. Trowbridge, W.E. Evans, J. Glover, E. Newman, J.W. Egglestone, J.H. Mulvany. R. Ferguson, S.C. Richardson; Hon. Auditors, Messrs. E.H. Cooke and J.J. Killen.

As the nominations did not exceed the offices to be filled, there will be, consequently, no election at the annual meeting, which will be held on Thursday 28th March. The dinner will take place on Wednesday 27th March.

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
Since the last report two general meetings have been held, at which lantern slides were shown by Messrs. H.J. Trowbridge, Ward, Harvey, Harvie, Varley and Miscamble. The meeting convened for January 23rd was postponed owing to the news being received that day of the demise of Her Majesty the Queen.




Thursday 4th April 1901  Page 22 - Punch (Melbourne, Vic.)

The first annual dinner of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held at the Port Phillip Club Hotel on Wednesday evening, 27th March. The president of the society, Mr. H.J. Trowbridge, occupied the chair and about thirty sat down to dinner. An excellent menu had been prepared, most of the dishes being honored with humorously appropriate photographic names. Only two toasts were given - 'The King', proposed by the chairman and 'The Association', proposed by the president-elect, Mr. F.A. Kernot. During the evening the chairman delivered a highly interesting address upon the benefits of amateur clubs, his remarks being much applauded. Mr. J.W. Eggleston sang his song, 'The Empire's One', with patriotic spirit, the diners joining in the chorus. Mr. Lee gave a couple of recitations admirably, Messrs. W.R. Furlong and F.W. Miscamble (Hon.Secretary) sang and numerous selections were given on the concert-phonograph kindly lent by Messrs. Baker and Rouse. A most enjoyable evening was spent and a hope generally expressed that these dinners should become a permanent institution. During the evening Mr. T.H. Sears took a flashlight photo.


FIRST ANNUAL DINNER OF THE
AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA




22nd April 1901  Page 24 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
The twelve months just closed have witnessed considerable progress in the affairs of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria. There has been an increase in the numerical strength — 20 new members, and but two resignations. The Syllabus has been, for the first time for many years, contributed to very largely by; members generally and others, and for this the Council feel much relief, as the burden of former annual reports was to the effect that the members outside the executive did little to assist the Council in any practical manner.

The following papers and demonstrations were given: “Practical Hints and Dodges in Manipulation” by Mr. Robert W. Harvie. “Isochromatic Photography: a consideration of the true rendering of color subjects in monotone by the use of ray filters and sensitizers” by Mr. D.W. Paterson. “The History of X-Rays; their origin and uses (with demonstration)” by Dr. William R. Fox. “Photography in Natural Colors — Ive’s method of triple lantern projection” by Mr. J. Patterson. “The Recticon Camera Back” exhibited and explained by Mr. W.E. Evans. “Photographic Lenses” by Mr. A.W. Craven, M.L.A., and Mr. J.H. Harvey, A.R.V.I.A. “Journeys in Other Lands”, lantern exhibition and lecture, by Mr. E. Norton Grimwade. “My Failures in Three Color Printing” by Mr. J. Pettigrew. “The Oxygen Bottle and Brier’s Automatic Gauge and Regulator” by Mr. E. Norton Grimwade. “The Victorian Grampians”, lantern lecture, by Mr. Arthur J. Relph, Hon.Secretary, Working Men's College Photographic Club. “The Acetylene Gas Light”, paper and demonstration, by Mr. R. Ferguson. “Ozotype”, paper and demonstration, by the President, Mr. H.J. Trowbridge. “Focal Plane Work”, paper and demonstration, by Mr. W.E. Evans.

In addition to the foregoing valuable contributions to the records of the investigation in the many and varied branches of the Photographic Art and Science, which papers are, on the whole, of the highest importance, the Association gave an Exhibition for members work, which was held on the 23rd and 24th November. The Exhibition was an unqualified success, eliciting praise from many who were accustomed to the old world standards. The members, with but few exceptions, made a great rally, and the pictures shown were thoroughly representative. There were upwards of 200 exhibits, covering some 700 square feet of wall space. The following members exhibited — Messrs. Trowbridge, Ferriera, Newman, Robert W. Harvie, Clutten, Aitken, Paterson, Mulvany, Byrne, Pettigrew, Goslett, Ward, Burton, J.H. Harvey, Fitts, J. Temple Stephens, Henderson, F.L. Baker, J.C, Stephens, Watts, Gillespie, Dr. Clendinnen Madden, Kermot, Glover, Owen, Kett, Dr. Fox, Miscamble, “Zero” and “Handy Camera”. The Exhibition was opened on the evening of the 23rd November by the Mayor of Melbourne. The attendance was very satisfactory, it being computed that, at least, some seven or eight hundred visited the Exhibition.

At a Smoke Night, held on 22nd August, a presentation was made to Mr. E.W. Burton, who had been Hon. Custodian of the Society for the previous 17 years.

One of the most important features of the Syllabus was the official representation of the Working Men's College Photographic Club by Mr. Relph, who gave the paper referred to herein above.

The Council at various times has expressed a wish that a closer relationship with kindred societies could be established, and it hopes, in the near future, to devise means whereby this end can be accomplished. The other parts of the Syllabus cannot be commented upon in the same manner. The two outings were not successful. On one occasion the weather prevented, and on the other the alteration of the date of the holiday, affected the arrangements. The visit to the Melbourne Observatory was, however, successful, from an astronomical and photographic point of view. The nights devoted to the reports of Individual Progress, Criticism of Prints, Lantern Slides, etc., were not enthusiastically responded to. The majority of those who attended came, apparently, as critics, but who were very diffident about expressing criticism of any sort. The Dinner, which was held on the 27th March, I am happy to say, has proved successful, and it is believed to be the forerunner of what will be an annual affair.

The Lantern Committee has despatched a collection of fifty-one slides as a loan to the Photographic Society of New South Wales, and the Association has been promised a collection in return.

The members, who are neither executive officers nor councilors, can help the Association very materially by bringing the objects and advantages of membership before their photographic friends; and by so doing, increasing the roll of members.

The Council regret to place on record the death of one of the members, R.T. Blackwell, F.I.A.V., who for 30 years had been an enthusiastic amateur; but who, latterly, had not been a regular attendant. There have been some twenty meetings held, at which attendances have been good, with the exception of those on Mafeking night, and the night following the return of the Contingent from South Africa. In conclusion, the Council desires to congratulate the members on the substantial progress which has been made.



SIR SAMUEL GILLOTT

Born 29 October 1838 Sheffield, United Kingdom
Died 29 June 1913 (aged 74) Sheffield, United Kingdom


47th MAYOR of MELBOURNE 1900 - 1902




22nd July 1901  Page 26 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
“Royal Visit Photography” was the subject of the May meeting, and some very excellent work was shown by the following members Mr. Goslett (prints), Mr. Mulvany (stereoscopic work), Mr. Cooke (prints), Mr. Ferguson (prints). The work was of a high class, illustrative character, showing the various street scenes, arches, and Royal procession. Four new members were elected, Messrs. W. Howieson, T. Stephens, C.K. Eggleston, and Major Perry (S.A.).

On June 12, Mr. Percy Hume gave a very interesting demonstration on “Film Development”. The lecturer said he found that films were hardly ever used in the Commonwealth, although in America and England they were in great demand. He claimed advantages for the films, in their portability and convenience, for long tour traveling; also that they were less liable to halation than plates. The extra cost of films, as against glass plates, their keeping qualities and manipulation, were referred to in answer to queries by his audience.

All the necessary operations were neatly and easily carried out. The special advantage of films for panoramic photography was shown, and a panoramic camera was exhibited. Many samples of film negatives and prints were also exhibited, in addition to a strip of six 5x4 exposures that was developed without cutting.

Mr. Mais, M. Inst, C.E., Vice-president, was in the chair. Messrs Harvey, Purton, and others alluded to their experiences with films.




Thursday 15th August 1901  Page 4 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

Color Photography was the subject of an exceedingly lucid and interesting lecture given by Mr. Herbert Bickerton, under the auspices of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, at Furlong's studio, Royal-arcade, last evening. Mr. Bickerton has recently arrived from England and was able to describe the latest developments of the art and to show the results obtainable by it with the aid of a lantern screen. The first part of the lecture dealt with the principles which govern color vision, after which a very clear exposition was given of the processes required for the production of a photographic picture in natural colors. The ordinary camera is the very father of lies, according to the lecturer, with regard to color, as was illustrated by a photograph of a vase of flowers, in which the tone values were the reverse of those in the subject; but a marvellous improvement was shown by the use of stained slides and a light screen. Some very beautiful examples of the new art were thrown on the canvas and showed that the most delicate and the richest hues can be accurately reproduced by the camera with the new method. The gorgeous color effects of a sunset was the most striking and beautiful of the series and elicited the unbounded admiration of the company. The new art evidently bids fair soon to super-ede entirely the old process of monochrome photography.



22nd August 1901  Page 21 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
“New Zealand, as I saw it,” was the title of a show of some ninety lantern slides given by Mr. John Donaldson on 26th June, the lecturer giving a full description of the wonderful country, its people, and their customs. The greater portion of the slides were made by the lecturer; some by Mr. H. Owen, late of New Zealand, and now a member; and a few by M. Levy, of Paris. There was a large attendance. Two new members were elected.

On the 10th July, “Press Photo Work and the Royal Visit”, by Mr. Robert D. Harvie, drew an appreciative audience of the majority of the experts of the Association. The lecturer described in detail the qualifications, duties, and difficulties of the press photographers in general, and with relation to the recent celebrations in particular; the great value of the photographic art to the weekly press; the advancement made in illustrated papers, owing to the aid of photography. At the conclusion of the paper, an adjournment was made to the studio and work rooms of Messrs. Harvie & Sutcliffe, of Cromwell Buildings, Bourke Street, the visitors being shown over by Mr. Harvie and his partner. The many up-to-date appliances were described in detail to the members, who were unanimous in their expressions of appreciation of the advantages accruing from the possession of the same.

The President, in proposing the health of Mr. Harvie, stated that the Association could congratulate itself upon having so expert a member as Mr. Robert Harvie had proved himself to be. Mr. Rae, in seconding this proposal, gave a very brief, but interesting resume of the difficulties which Mr. Harvie had overcome, and which had not been dwelt upon by the lecturer. As a practical man in press work, he knew what had been accomplished.

After musical honors, in response Mr. Harvie said he attributed his success because he was always an “amateur” in heart, as the amateur enthusiasm was necessary to carry one over difficulties and to keep to the front. Mr. Harvie drew attention to the matter of accommodation for press photographers in connection with the Duke’s visit, which was not to be compared with that obtainable in the United Kingdom on similar occasions.

Three new members were elected.

Mr. Anketell Henderson, M.C.E., on 24th July gave an address upon “Some Improvements in Apparatus, etc.” which was well illustrated by a large collection of the various appliances and models of the larger items. The lecturer, in opening his address, dwelt upon the need of flooding the dark-room with sunlight every day, in order to keep the air in a sanitary condition. He cited one case where a friend had met his death owing to the absence of this elementary law of sanitation. Most dark-rooms were, generally speaking, breeding grounds for microbes. A model of a three-blind window was shown; a four-sided lamp, with a candle as the source of light; a model of a developing table, with sink shelves and cover very cleverly combined; a traveler’s developing kit; a printing frame, with special adjustments for bromide printing; an enlarging apparatus, with many special features; an inexpensive form of photographic album; a sciopticon, with a mirror reflector; a 1/4 plate hand camera, holding eight plates, folding into a very small compass; a 7 plate hand camera, twin lens, holding twenty plates; a wide angle lens camera, for special work in architectural photography; a special camera for taking six negatives on a quarter plate. The lecturer recommended Pyro and Ammonia, and Hydroquinone and Metol Developers, and the Acid and Alum Hypo Bath.

Considerable discussion ensued upon the last recommendation, opinion being divided upon its merits. The lecturer claimed he was a “lazy” man, but the many inventions shown indicated that a very large amount of time had been spent in devising and carrying out the ideas, which were, in the main, time and labor-saving, and of great practical value to the amateur photographer. Mr. Henderson introduced a Mr. Gray, who had, in conjunction with his (the lecturer’s) son, carried out many of the ideas into practical effect. Mr. Gray showed a hand camera, capable of carrying 5 x 4, or 1/4 plates, of his own design and make, with focal plane shutter and special focusing adjustment.

On 14th August, Mr. Herbert Brickerton read a paper upon “Color Photography”, as exemplified by the Sanger-Shepherd process, in making lantern slides. The demonstration was by means of the prism, and some specially prepared lantern slides of the lecturer, illustrating the principles of color vision, and some slides made by Mr. Sanger-Shepherd, which gave results very beautiful. The new process consists of the super-imposing of three positive films for the slide, made from three negatives upon plates specially prepared and exposed through their respective primary color light filters. Mr. J. Patterson (of Messrs, Patterson & Shugg), a visitor, showed a slide made upon this principle. A hearty vote of thanks was carried with acclamation. The ordinary Monochrome Slides were also shown, illustrating the Duke’s Visit, Trip to Gembrook, Picnics at Johannesburg, Electric Sparks, which were made by Messrs. E.T. Blackwell (deceased), F.E. Blackwell, Glover, Wood, and the Hon.Secretary.




Saturday 14th September 1901  Page 10 - The Register (Adelaide SA)

The monthly meeting of the South Australian Photographic Society was held at the society of arts rooms on Thursday evening, September, 12. There was a good attendance of members and visitors and the president, Mr. A.H. Kingsborough, occupied the chair. Four new members were nominated for election at next meeting and four new members nominated at last meeting were elected. The following circular letter was received from the Queensland Amateur Photographic Society and was referred to the committee: With regard to my circular letter of May 13 last, bringing under your notice the question of an Australian branch of the affiliation of the Royal Photographic Society of London, I am instructed to again write to you on the matter and to state that favorable replies have now been received from the following societies: Photographic Society of New South Wales, Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, Northern Tasmania Camera Club, Dunedin Photographic Society, South Australian Photographic Society.




With regard to further steps my committee considers that it is advisable for each society to affiliate separately with the London society without delay and that further action should take the form of an association or federation of the societies so affiliated for purposes to be defined. I am requested to ask that your society will take steps, if you have not already done so, to affiliate with the London society. My committee will in the meantime take into further consideration the details of a scheme for co-operation and will address you again on that matter as soon as possible. It would, at the same time, be of advantage for your committee also to take the question into consideration, but for the present I have two principal points to suggest.
1. The holding of an annual, biennial, or triennial congress of photographers in the chief cities.
2. The initiating of such congresses would appropriately come from one of the senior states, say, either New South Wales or Victoria.

The question of allowing members nominated at this meeting for election at next meeting to compete in the annual exhibition of the society, to be held during the week, October 14 to 19 next, was discussed. It was pointed out that the rules would not allow it and it was resolved that persons concerned should be informed of this fact and that the society would be pleased to see their work exhibited in the non-competitive section. The president announced that many satisfactory enquiries had been received from photographers in the eastern states and Tasmania for prospectuses of the exhibition and that he anticipated a large number of entries from the other states. A letter was received from "Magpie", of "The Register", enquiring as to photographs of the old road taken during the society's excursion to Norton's Summit on 12th August. The president announced that Mr. G. Stace had provided some pictures and that Lady Tennyson, who had seen them, had paid Mr. Stace the high compliment of asking "Magpie" to obtain duplicates of some of them for her. The president suggested that in recognition of "Magpie's" kindly assistance in many ways members should send her a selection of the pictures taken. The following letter was received from S.P. Bond, Limited: "With reference to the forthcoming exhibition to be held in your society, we have pleasure in making you the offer, for intending exhibitors, of the use of our enlarging room free; also, for work intended for exhibition, the free use of any 12 x 10 bromide paper, Wellington & Ward make". Mr. C.L. Whitham, in proposing a vote of thanks to Mr. S.P. Bond for his generous offer, which was carried by acclamation, mentioned that members were already deeply indebted to him for great assistance. Messrs. Dobbie and Radcliffe endorsed Mr. Whitham's remarks and Mr. Radcliffe added that Mr. Bond's new room was an exceedingly comfortable one. On the recommendation of the committee, Sir Edwin Smith was, in recognition of his eminent services to the society, unanimously elected a life member. The committee brought forward a recommendation that the society's journal, the "Quarterly Record", be continued and the president made some caustic comments on the lack of support which should have been extended to the "Record" by many members. A motion that the publication he discontinued was not seconded, but on the proposition of Mr. C.L. Whitham, seconded by Mr. F.W. Martin and supported by Messrs. C. Radcliffe and Andrew Scott, it was resolved "that the question be referred back to the committee in the hope that the magazine may be continued". The president announced several donations to the annual exhibition prize fund and reminded members that the last date for receiving entries to the exhibition was 7th October.

The subject for the evening was an interesting address by Mr. A.W. Dobbie on "Stereoscopic Photography", during which he explained to members and illustrated by practical work, the additions necessary to be made to the camera to follow up this most fascinating branch of the art. In Mr. Dobbie's hands the operations appeared exceedingly simple and from the number of members who questioned him at the close of his remarks and inspected his apparatus, it would appear that many of them intend to take up the subject. If any one thing were required to quite convert the doubtful ones, that was abundantly supplied by the magnificent sets of stereoscopic transparencies supplied in hundreds by Mr. Dobbie, together with dozens of stereoscopes and the necessary small tables and lamps. Members were seated at these lamps until a late hour, traveling all over the world by stereoscope. The lecturer was accorded a hearty vole of thanks on the motion of Mr. C.L. Whitham, seconded by Mr. Andrew Scott.




Thursday 10th October 1901  Page 4 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The principles of photography in natural colors were lucidly explained by Mr. J. Patterson at the fortnightly gathering of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, held at the Royal arcade last night. Mr. Patterson, who has made a close study of the subject, which at the present time is exceedingly interesting to photographers, gave a practical demonstration of color work with the aid of a triple lantern projection. Assisted by Mr. R.W. Harvie, he showed original photographs as well as copies from the work of Mr. F. Ives, a prominent American color photographer. Keen interest was taken by the members, whose patience in this some cases has been sorely taxed by the difficulties of color work.



22nd October 1901  Page 87 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
SMOKE SOCIAL:
Owing to very inclement weather the seventy odd members and friends had plenty of elbow room at the Port Phillip Club Hotel on 28th ult. Damp outside but dry inside; some of the recitations I mean. The President, Mr. F.A. Kernot (Chairman). Songs were rendered by Messrs. Cresswell, Laurence, Furlong, Norcott, Wicks and Miscamble. Recitations by Messrs. Egan, Lee and Norcott. Zither Solo by Mr. Duncan Fraser. Concert Phonograph by Mr. W.E. Evans. Lantern Slides illustrating The Alhambra, Spain, were shown by Mr. Ward. Crystal Palace Art Studies by Mr. Madden - Illustrated Songs, Queen of the Earth and Larboard Watch. Some special sky effects by Mr. Towbridge; also some of general interest by Messrs. Madden, Trowbridge and Miscamble. Two new members were elected. Messrs. G.F. Beauchamp and J.T. Timmons.

CARBON WORK:
11th October, Mr. D.W. Paterson very ably filled the bill in lieu of Mr. E. Newman, who has had to resign through ill-health. After giving a full explanation of the various operations, the lecturer carried out the practical part of the work in a very expeditious and effective manner, demonstrating the beauty and simplicity of the process. Several prints, transparencies and lantern slides were developed. A visitor, Mr. Sydney Gibbons, displayed some samples of the latest advancement in three-color printing.




21st December 1901  Page 143 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
At the meeting held 25th September, Mr. P. Madden exhibited a large collection of lantern slides illustrating a lecture given by him entitled “Some Glimpses in Paris”. The descriptive matter was very original and instructive throughout. At the conclusion Messrs. Joshua, Byrne and Ferguson also showed some slides.

On the 9th October, Mr. J. Patterson, assisted by Messrs. Shugg and Robert W. Harvie, repeated his lecture and demonstration of the latest advancement of “Photography in Natural Colors”, which was given for the first time in Australia at the same place on 27th June 1900. There was a large attendance of members and friends. Six new members were elected.

An outing to the Observatory was the special business of the following meeting. Mr. Ingamilt’s enabled the members to view the Moon, Saturn, Jupiter, and lesser lights through the telescope and pointed out the various features of the same.

Mr. Dudley le Souef C.M.Z., of the Zoological Gardens, representative of the Working Men's College Photographic Club delivered a lecture on the 13th December, entitled “An Evening with Australian Birds”. The lecturer showed about 60 lantern illustrations depicting both land and sea birds in their nests, many of the photos had been taken at danger and risk, but the result fully repaid him. It is a little difficult to give a resume of the lecture, suffice to say that for one hour and a half he kept the audience engrossed with the wonders of bird life and the perfect way in which they construct their nests, etc. He pressed on his hearers the advantage of always taking their camera with them when they went into the country, not only to take views of scenery, but also to take records of things they may notice of interest, such as nests of birds, nests of insects, curious growth on trees, etc., and by so doing they will soon find what a number of interesting views they will be able to get, with which they will be able to both amuse and instruct their friends. A hearty vote of thanks was accorded the lecturer on the motion of the President, and several questions relating to the subject of the lecture were asked and answered. Two new members were elected.




Monday 10th March 1902  Page 5 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

SAD BOATING FATALITY
A LAUNCH CAPSIZED
Mr. FREDERICK FITTS DROWNED

General regret has been occasioned by the news of a sad accident which happened at Nagambie on Saturday morning, resulting in the drowning of Mr. Frederick Fitts, of the firm of Lloyd Tayler and Fitts, architects, of Melbourne. Mr. T. Hewlett M.R.C.S. and Mrs Hewlett have been spending a short holiday at Nagambie and were staying at the Valley Hotel, on the shores of the lake. They were joined by Mr. Frederick Fitts (Mr. Hewlett's stepson) on Friday evening and at 11pm on Saturday morning a party, consisting of Mr. Oliver Dolphin, proprietor of the hotel; Mr. and Mrs Hewlett, Mr. R.M.K. Gollan, excise inspector; Mr. Frederick Fitts and Mr. J. Leyden, left the landing-place opposite the hotel and proceeded up the lake towards Tabilk in the steam-launch Merriwee. The launch belonged to Mr. Dolphin and was in constant use for excursions of the kind. It was headed across the lake towards the river, but when about 30 chains from the starting-point it crashed into a stump a few inches below the surface and almost instantly filled and sank. The occupants, who were totally unprepared for any such alarming contingency, were in a few moments struggling for their lives in the water.

The lake at the spot where the accident happened is from 6ft to 12ft in depth. None of the occupants of the boat, with the exception of Mr. Leyden, were able to swim and it appeared at one time as if they would all be drowned. The accident, however, was witnessed by a boy named Lodering from the bank and getting a boat, he rowed quickly to the spot and with the assistance of Mr. Leyden, rescued the rest of the party, with the exception of Mr. Frederick Fitts, who sank before the boat arrived. They pulled about in the vicinity of the spot for some time, but he did not reappear on the surface and the rescued party, who were exhausted by their struggles, were rowed ashore and taken to the hotel. The lake on which the accident occurred was formed by the backing up of the water of the river by the Goulburn weir.

The water completely inundated a large area which was occupied by farms, including a quantity of heavily-timbered land and the bottom of the lake is covered with stumps of trees, some of which reach almost to the surface of the water. The recent dry season has caused the level of the lake to fall about 3ft. and has considerably added to the danger of boating on it. Mr. Herbert Hewlett M.R.C.P., received a number of telegrams from his father on Saturday, giving brief particulars of the occurrence, in one of which he described the escape of himself and Mrs Hewlett as almost miraculous. It is expected that he will return to Melbourne to-day. The body of the deceased was recovered yesterday in 8ft of water. A magisterial inquiry was held before Messrs. John Gordon and E.W. Hill J.P.'s, when a verdict of death from shock and drowning, the result of a boating accident, was recorded. The untimely death of Mr. Frederick Fitts, who was in his 36th year, deprives Melbourne of one of its most prominent architects. He was associated with Mr. Lloyd Tayler for some years as partner in the firm of Lloyd Tayler and Fitts. Mr. Lloyd Taylor died a little over a year ago and since his death Mr. Frederick Fitts had been carrying on the business. He was born and educated in Melbourne and the promise of success which he gave at the outset of his career was being early fulfilled at the time of his death. He was one of the architects who designed the Commercial Bank Buildings and did a great deal of useful work in designing the wool stores of the New Zealand Loan and Mercantile Agency Company, while the recent additions to the stands at Flemington have been carried out in accordance with his plans and those of Mr. Byron Moore. In the prize competition for the best design for the Melbourne Exhibition buildings Mr. Frederick Fitts secured the second award of the judges. In connection with his death a melancholy interest attaches to the announcement which was made a few days ago that he would read a paper before the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria on next Wednesday evening Mr. Frederick Fitts, who lived at Hawthorn-grove, Hawthorn, leaves a widow and family of four young children. His two brothers, Messrs. H.A. Fitts and Ernest Fitts, are well known in the musical world.




21st March 1902  Page 85 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
The annual ladies social was held on the 11th December. Mr. J. Aebi exhibited upon the screen slides showing beautiful continental scenery, and Dr. McCarthy and Mr. S.C. Richardson exhibited slides illustrating American scenery. These were interspersed with music and phonographic selections. Refreshments were served. His Honor Judge Docker, President of the Photographic Society of New South Wales, possessing that rare virtue, reciprocity, gave a lantern lecture upon "The Trachyte Mountains of New South Wales” on 17th January. His Honor, in opening the lecture, stated he had felt it a duty to reciprocate, in some way, for the shows given by Messrs Harvey and Trowbridge before the Photographic Society of New South Wales. The slides shown were, without exception, noted for their pictorial treatment, and were thoroughly interesting. They illustrated the wonderful scenery in the vicinity of the Liverpool Plains and Naomi River. At the conclusion of the lecture, which abounded with valuable information, the Chairman (President F.A. Kerust) strongly recommended His Honor to visit the Victorian Grampians. A hearty vote of thanks to the lecturer was accorded with acclamation. The loan set of lantern slides forwarded by the Photographic Society of New South Wales to this Association, and the loan set recently returned by that Society, were shown on the lantern night held 26th February. Many of the visiting slides evoked applause, and it is hoped that this exchange will prove an "annual affair", also that other societies may follow suit. The meeting of 12th March was filled with gloom owing to the untimely death of Mr. F.A. Fitts, A.R.V.I.A., who had been announced for some time to read a paper written by the late Mr. Lloyd Tayler. An unpreventable boating accident being the cause of the death of this valued member, who was buried the day before the meeting of the Association. After the purely formal business of electing three members, the meeting adjourned, as a mark of respect to the memory of the deceased. Several members, including the Chairman, Mr. H.C. Mais, M.Inst., C.E., personally testified to the good qualities of the deceased. The Hon.Secretary was instructed to write a letter of condolence to the widow. A Postal Photographic Club is about to start. The second annual dinner will be held on 9th April.



Thursday 17th April 1902  Page 22 - Punch (Melbourne, Vic.)

The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria held its second annual dinner at the Melbourne Coffee Palace on Wednesday evening. The president (Mr. F.A. Kernot) occupied the chair. The lady members were well represented. After an excellent dinner had been served the following members and friends contributed to a very pleasant entertainment: "The Beauty Spots of the Harbour", by Sydney amateurs, were projected upon the screen by the limelight lantern. A series of "Lighthouses of Victoria", by Professor T.W. Fowler, C.E.; "Sunrise and Sunset Pictures", by Mr. H.J. Trowbridge; "Flower Studies on Carbon Slides" and "Racing Pictures", by Mr. W.E. Evans; and "Locomotives, Ancient and Modern" by Mr. R. Ferguson, were also shown.



21st April 1902  Page 116 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
The following have been nominated, and there being; but a sufficient number for the respective offices, will be declared elected at the annual meeting:

President, Mr. E. W. Purton.
Vice-Presidents, Messrs. H.C. Mais, and J. W. Eggleston.
Hon.Secretary, Mr. F.W. Miscamble.
Hon. Assistant-Secretary, Mr. Chas. Egan-Lee.
Hon. Treasurer, Mr. E.K. Byrne.
Hon. Librarian, Mr. J.H. Harvey.
Hon. Custodian of Apparatus, Mr. H.C. Ward.
Council, Messrs. E. Ferguson, J. Glover, C.B. Goslett, E.C. Joshua, F.A. Kernot, J.H. Mulvany, T. Stephens, and H.J. Trowbridge.
Hon. Auditors, Messrs. E.H. Cooke and J.J. Killen.

The second annual dinner was held at the Melbourne Coffee Palace on Wednesday 9th April.

The President, Mr. F.A. Kernot, occupied the chair. The lady members of the Association were well represented.

After an excellent dinner had been served, the limelight lantern was brought into requisition, and the loan collection of the Photographic Society of New South Wales was shown upon the screen; also a series of light houses of Victoria, by Professor T.W. Fowler C.E. Sunrise and sunset pictures, by Mr. H.J. Trowbridge (these latter showed the varied effects by copper toning); flower studies, on carbon slides, and some racing scenes, by Mr. W.E. Evans; and locomotives, ancient and modern, by Mr. E. Ferguson, concluded this portion of a pleasant evening. Songs were rendered by Messrs. Cresswell and W.E. Furlong, the latter singing “The Childer Coming Home”, words by Lawson, and music by the singer. A recitation by the Hon. Assistant-Secretary elect and Auld Lang Syne brought an enjoyable evening to a close.




21st May 1902  Page 146 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
At the Annual Meeting held on 14th May, Mr. J.W. Eggleston was elected President, and Mr. Robert Ferguson, Vice-President, in lieu of those nominated. The other Office-bearers and Committee were declared elected. The Hon.Secretary’s Report and Treasurer’s Balance-Sheet for the year ending 30th March were read, received, and unanimously adopted. Two new members were elected.

At the conclusion of this formal business, Mr. Robert W. Harvie gave a demonstration of the Toning of Bromide Prints.

The following baths were worked:
(1) Hypo, 4 ozs; Alum, 1 oz.; Water, 8 ozs. to 20 ozs. This bath gave very rich light brown tones, and was very inexpensive.
(2) Ferguson’s Formula: Ten per cent, solutions. Potass. Citrate, 1 oz.; Sulphate of Copper, 70 minims; Ferricyanide, 60 minims. Result — a range of tones from purple-brown to a reddish-cherry.
(3) Equal quantities, twenty per cent, solution of Ferricyanide and Citrate of Iron, and Ammonia. This bath tones blue, being not so strongly recommended as the other two.

The lecturer stated that the toning made the prints more permanent. A chrome alum bath was necessary before treatment. Amidol was the developer used by him as it saved the washing before hypo. The second bath was suitable for lantern slides.

After many questions had been answered, the President, Mr. W.J. Eggleston closed the meeting by thanking the lecturer for his very instructive demonstration. There were many samples of Mr. Harvie’s shewn which fully illustrated the possibilities of this beautiful process.

SECRETARY’S REPORT FOR 1901-02
The year just completed has been further evidence of the improved vitality of the Association. The members roll has had an accession of twenty-seven names during the year and now numbers ninety-five, the largest since the inception of the Association.

One of the most gratifying features of the year’s progress has been the desire of like associations to exchange samples of work and to endeavor to form a bond of union — the Royal Photographic Society of London, in forming an affiliation of Photographic Societies, has aided very considerably in this matter, this Association having been admitted into the affiliation. It is a matter of regret that through unforeseen circumstances our representative, Mr. D.W. Paterson, was debarred from giving a demonstration on carbon work at the Working Men’s College Photographic Club at the time appointed.

The Photographic Society of New South Wales has exchanged loan sets of lantern slides with the Association and it is hoped that other Inter-State Societies will follow suit.

A Postal Photographic Club has been resolved upon by the Council, and those forming same will be called upon to frame the conditions.

The Library has not been availed of by the members, and it appears to have outlived its usefulness, possibly from the want of up-to-date literature and a more suitable locale.

Your sub-committee has considered the several suggested alterations to the Rules and By-Laws, and you will be called together at a special meeting to resolve upon the same. It is the wish of your Council that members who have not yet taken office should come forward and share the burdens of carrying on the Association; those who expect all their fellow members to entertain them, and yield nothing in exchange for such service, are somewhat unfair. It should be remembered that the ten shilling subscription only covers the necessary expenses of rent, printing, postage, and advertising. Thanks are due to the following non-members for their respective contributions to the Syllabus: Mr. J. Patterson, “Photography in Natural Colors”, showing Ive’s method of triple lantern projection; Mr. Herbert Bickerton, “Photography in Natural Colors”, showing the process perfected by Mr. Sauger Shepherd; Mr. J. Aebi, “Lantern Slides of Continental Scenery”; His Honor Judge Docker, President of the Photographic Society of New South Wales, “Lantern Slides of N.S.W. Scenery”; Mr. Dudley le Souef, C.M.L.S., as representative of the Working Men’s College Photographic Club, “An Evening with Australian Birds”, lantern night.

The following members also contributed Mr. P. Hume, “Film Development and Panoramic Photography”; Mr. Robert W. Harvie read a paper on “Press Photo Work during Royal Visit” and showed the members over the studio, dark-rooms, of Messrs. Harvie and Sutcliffe; Mr. D.W. Paterson, “Carbon Printing”; Mr. A.M. Henderson, M.C.E. “Some Improvements in Apparatus”; Mr. J. Donaldson, “New Zealand as I saw it”, lantern night; Mr. J. Madden, “A Few Glimpses of Paris”, lantern night. Messrs. Trowbridge, Ward, Dr. McCarthy, Ferguson, Richardson, Joshua, Byrne, and Miscamble also showed selections of their work in lantern slide making. A visit to the Observatory was the only outing for the year. A smoke social, a ladies social evening, and the second annual dinner (with lady members joining in the same) comprised the social side of the Syllabus. It is with the deepest regret that we have to record the death of two of the members, Messrs. J.T. Gillespie and F.A. Tibbs, that of the latter being painfully sudden owing to an accident, and occurring just before the date of the meeting at which he was announced to read a paper.


F.W. MISCAMBLE
HON.SECRETARY




Saturday 21st June 1902  Page 3 - The Register (Adelaide, SA)
Monday 23rd June 1902  Page 5 - The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA)

The monthly meeting of the South Australian Photographic Society was held at the society's rooms on Thursday evening, 19th June. There was a full attendance of members and visitors and the President (Mr. A.H. Kingsborough) occupied the chair.

A letter was received from the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria requesting the exchange of a collection of lantern slides, with the object of fostering a closer relationship between interstate photographic societies; and stating that, apart from the opportunity of viewing new beauty spots, great advantage will certainly accrue from the study of the methods of others. Resolved that the suggestion be adopted and members were requested to assist the committee by forwarding slides to the President or Hon.Secretary.




Friday 11th July 1902  Page 4 - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW)

The annual meeting of the Photographic Society of New South Wales was held at the School of Arts recently. Judge Docker presided and delivered an address congratulating the society on the progress it had made. Addresses were also delivered by Messrs. R.N. Kirk, James S. Stening, E.T. Davis and Jago. The report showed a decrease of membership, but an improved financial position. During the year papers on photographic subjects had been read and demonstrations of different processes given at the monthly meetings, the contributors being - Mr. G. O'Shea, on the "Carbon Printing Process", Mr. James S. Stening, on "Platinotype Printing Process", Dr. H.H. Harris, on "Radiography", explaining the discovery of the X rays; Mr. Mark Blow, on "Animated Photography"; Mr. Perier, on "Enlarged Negatives"; Mr. W.C. Fisher, on the "Ozotype Printing Process" and Mr. James S. Stening, on "Landscape Photography". The society's summer show had been a marked success. The special prize presented by Messrs Baker and Rouse, Limited, was awarded to Mr. Leadham, of Auckland, New Zealand; the society's medal (second prize) going to Mr. Joyner, of Adelaide. A collection of lantern slides, loaned by the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, was exhibited on two evenings and highly appreciated by those present. On return a loan collection of slides was got together by members of the society and sent to Victoria for exhibition, the largest contribution being from Mr. James Heron. It was proposed to hold an international exhibition in September, 1903. It was decided, on the motion of Mr. Stening, to secure suitable rooms for the use of the society as soon as possible and as rooms had been kindly offered to the society gratis by Mr. W. Johnson, of London Bank-chambers, it was decided to accept the offer while arrangements were being made. The following gentlemen were then elected as office-bearers for the coming year - President, Judge Docker; vice-Presidents, Sir James Fairfax, Messrs. R.N. Kirk, E.T. Davis and James S. Stening; committee, Messrs. J. Heron, H.R. Curlewis, C.W. Middleton, H.P. Bushell and W. Johnson; Hon.Treasurer, Mr. W.C. Fisher; Hon.Secretary, Mr. F.W. Proctor; Librarian, Mr. A.J. Perier.



Thursday 28th August 1902  Page 4 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

A lecture, which was full of highly interesting information, was delivered by Mr. P. Baracchi, the Government Astronomer, before the members of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, last evening. Mr. Baracchi's subject was literally as wide as the heavens, embracing, as it did, lunar, solar, nebulae and star photography, chief attention being devoted to the last mentioned branch of work. With the aid of a series of lantern views the lecturer showed his audience over the Melbourne Observatory and explained the purposes of the mysterious looking instruments there set up. Incidentally Mr. Baracchi expressed a hope that the Observatory staff would soon be relieved of all meteorological work, in which event greater opportunity would be created for astro-photography. During the last six months, he continued, the cataloging of earthquakes had been added to the duties of the Observatory officials. As far as the general public was concerned, he could hardly, see the use of such a record of seismic disturbances and he never could be persuaded that any good would he effected by the publication of an official bulletin, declaring, for instance. "Look out; earthquake arrives in five minutes". Mr. Baracchi was cordially thanked for his contribution to the society's syllabus.



22nd October 1902  Page 295 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
A general discussion evening is not, as a rule, an inducement for the average member to attend, but those attending invariably find it to their advantage to do so. On the 28th May the consideration of the perfect and imperfect negative print and lantern slide was the matter for discussion. Mr. Ferguson exhibited bromide prints toned with the alum and hypo bath, Mr. Joshua whole plate negatives and carbon prints of same, Mr. Glover, lantern slides. The qualities of various plates, methods of procedure in carbon printing, flashlight photography, cave exposures, actinometers in general, toning bromides, were fully and fruitfully discussed, and there was a thorough interchange of ideas respecting the several processes enumerated.

Mr. T.W. Fowler, C.E., exhibited a large collection of lantern slides illustrating “Light houses and Coastal Scenery” and read a paper upon the construction of lighthouses at the subsequent meeting of the Association.

On the 25th June Mr. H.H. Baker read a paper upon “Light” and, with the aid of the blackboard, illustrated his subject. The history of the discovery of facts and theories, intensity and brilliance at a distance of light, were related by the lecturer, who also described the various photometers, spectrum, and the action of light in photography.

A Lantern Night on the 9th July brought forth some 150 slides, which were exhibited upon the screen by Messrs. Trowbridge, Ward, Glover, Joshua, Richardson, Ferguson and Scott. The slides were criticized by the members.

On the 23rd July the Hon. Custodian, Mr. H.C. Ward, delivered an address upon “Stereo-Photography”. In his opening remarks, the lecturer referred to the early effects of Mr. Charles Wheatstone in 1838, who introduced the reflecting stereoscope, and Sir David Brewster who invented the lenticular stereoscope. The application of photography then known as Daguerrotypy to stereoscopic instruments astonished all by its marvelous results, and it has been stated that our late Queen was so pleased with the effects that she had a stereoscopic photograph made at the opening of the 1851 Exhibition, which necessitated a three minutes exposure, and included Her Majesty, Prince Consort, Napoleon 111., and Empress Eugenie, and this is the oldest stereo-print known to be extant. About the same time the Fox-Talbot paper positives were brought out, and helped to bring stereoscopes into popular use.

Oliver Wendell Holmes in 1861 constructed an instrument which embodied all the points of the form most commonly used in the present time (the only difference being that three grooves were provided with a sliding adjustment) and was known as the “Holmes Basis”. The lecturer then described the ideal camera for stereo work, viz., a half-plate with T.P. shutter behind the lenses, shifting panels and adjustable centers, a spring blind roller division, quickly removeable and a spring back to the camera, and constructed that it be used at times as a hand camera. An accurate level should be attached.

He recommended a pair of 4 in. R.R. lenses separated 3 in apart. The negative should be developed with full detail. All harshness should be avoided, otherwise sunlight will be rendered as frost or snow. The print should be of a warm brown color in preference. The lecturer then went through the whole operation of placing a stereoscopic transparency plate on a negative, exposing one half, reversing the negative and positive, and printing the other half, fixing in the acid bath, and showing the finished transparency ready for viewing in the stereoscope. A large amount of apparatus was exhibited and explained by the lecturer.

On the 13th August a smoke social was held at the Port Phillip Club. The President, Mr. J.W. Eggleston, took the chair. Lantern slides exhibiting “Victorian Coastal Scenery” by Mr. F.A. Kernot, “Volcanoes and Earth quakes”, also “Paris” by Mr. P. Madden, and “Venice” by Mr. Wiscamble (Hon.Secretary), were projected upon the screen.

Songs were rendered by Mr. Eggleston, Mr. Wicks, and Mr. Prowse, (Mr. Alexander accompanist), and recitations by Mr. C. Egan-Lea and Mr. Petrie. Several selections were given on the concert phonograph, lent by Messrs. Baker & Rouse, by Mr. Muirhead. A vote of thanks to the friends assisting concluded the evening.

Professor Pietro Baracchi, F.R.A.S., Acting-Government Astronomer, at the second meeting in August, delivered a lecture upon the “Astro-Photographic Work at the Melbourne Observatory”. By the aid of lantern views the lecturer showed his audience over the Observatory, and explained the purposes of the various instruments there set up. A large number of photographs of the various heavenly bodies were shown. Mr. T.W. Fowler proposed a hearty vote of thanks, which, although technically disallowed, was carried with acclamation.

On the 10th September Mr. Thomas Baker, of Baker & Rouse Proprietary, Ltd., gave a very instructive lecture and demonstration upon “Toning Sun P.O.P.”. Mr. Baker referred in his opening remarks to his previous lecture given before the Association some six years ago, at which he had introduced his discovery (now generally known) the Pretone Bath. Since then he had received a large amount of evidence in its favor, the bath obviating washing before toning and reducing the washing before fixing to one change of water. This was practically demonstrated, and sample tubes of the ingredients were distributed among the audience. Several experiments were made to prove the action of chemicals contained in various toning baths and the emulsions upon papers. The lecturer stated there was no short road to success in toning, as experience and practice was necessary. The one invariable advice was in toning, as in all other photographic operations, to measure quantities and the duration of time occupied in obtaining results, and to carefully note the same, in other words to work by rule. Temperature advised, 60°.

Good purples were, generally speaking, more difficult to get than the blacks or browns. They could be obtained with the soda acetate and borax baths, with a good allowance of gold. Amongst a lot of very valuable and practical information given by the lecturer during the course of the demonstration of several well known toning baths there was one item, which was new to many of the most experienced of those present, and that was the necessity to proportionately reduce the toning bath to the number of the prints toned and withdrawn, this simple operation ensuring evenness of tone. There was a large collection of prints, specially mounted, shown as the result of experiments ranging over a variety of baths, of which some sixty odd had been specially tested for the lecture. The prints were in sets of ten, marked with the formula of the respective baths; they numbered several hundreds. Special effects were obtained by squeegeeing upon matt glass. A hearty vote of thanks was tendered the lecturer.

At the last meeting in September, Dr. F.J. Clendinnen gave a demonstration upon “The Coloring of Lantern Slides”. Ordinary coloring matter was used and the effects were shown upon the screen. Most of the slides shown were evidence of the value of the methods adopted, which were simple and inexpensive. The lecturer also showed a large collection of slides illustrating the methods of X-ray work, and its advantages in surgery and medicine, and also in the detection of adulteration in food products and the imperfections of metals, miners fuses, and the value of diamonds, glass and precious stones and gold in quartz.

On the 8th October, Mr. Anketell Henderson M.C E., gave a lecture entitled “Development and Some Practical Hints on Photographic Manipulation”. The lecturer claimed the title of the lecture might more fairly be termed “Dark Room Work”. He claimed that it was very unwise for anyone to spend time in the dark room in daytime, and recommended all printing to be done with artificial light. The various qualities of Ferrous Oxalate, Pyro Ammonia, Pyro Soda, Hydroquinone, Amidol, Eikonogen, Metol, and Ortol developers were described in detail. Hydroquinone, Metol, and Ortol developers were those which answered all purposes, and were free from the defects of stain. The use of alternate developers was preferable to the varying of the Alkalies.

The stand development Hydroquinone and Ortol surpassed Glycin. The formula recommended by plate-makers was, as a rule, too slow. The speed of the plate was increased by the use of the modern developers. Some eight years ago the lecturer had published in The Photographic Review of Reviews that Hydroquinone and Metol would do all that was necessary in the development of plates, and with the modification of carbonate of potassium, instead of carbonate of soda, therein advised, he could still advocate the opinions therein expressed. The lecturer invited discussion, and claimed by his methods that he showed “How to be a Photographer, though Busy”. A very cleverly arranged developing table and window-cover and blinds were exhibited and explained. A general discussion followed. A vote of thanks to the lecturer concluded the business. The Association has now upwards of one hundred members.



SIR CHARLES WHEATSTONE

Born 6th February 1802 Gloucester, England
Died 19 October 1875 (aged 73) Paris, France



SIR DAVID BREWSTER

Born 11th December 1781 Canongate, Jedburgh, Roxburghshire
Died 10th February 1868 (aged 86) Allerly House, Gattonside, Roxburghshire


SCOTTISH PHYSICIST, MATHEMATICIAN, ASTRONOMER, INVENTOR,
WRITER, HISTORIAN OF SCIENCE AND UNIVERSITY PRINCIPAL







Wednesday 21st January 1903  Page 4 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

Amateur and professional photographers will be interested in an announcement appearing else where that from the well-known photographic stock house of Messrs. Baker and Rouse Proprietary. Ltd., Collins-street, a copy of an interesting lecture delivered by Mr. Thomas Baker before the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria can be procured free of charge. The lecture deals with a subject that all amateurs find particularly trying in the hot weather, namely, the toning of gelatine P.O.P., due to the frequent washings of the prints. The lecturer's method of working dispenses with all washing until after the prints have been taken out of the fixing bath. The strong points in favor of this new method are simplicity of working, saving of time and the certainty of attaining the results aimed at.



Saturday 24th January 1903  Page 3 - Ovens and Murray Advertiser (Beechworth, Vic.)

PHOTOGRAPHY - All amateur and professional photographers will notice advertised elsewhere the well known firm of Baker and Rouse Proprietary Ltd. will be pleased to send free by post a copy of an interesting and valuable lecture delivered by Mr. Thomas Baker before the Amateur Photographic Society of Victoria, on Toning "Austral", P.O.P. Mr. Baker demonstrated by a hundred specimens in every shade of color the undeniable proof of the great utility of his method of working, whereby all uncertainty of obtaining what is desired is obviated. Everyone knows from bitter experience the effect of hot weather on a gelatine surface paper due to prolonged washing. With this new method the only effect of the hot weather is to shorten the time of toning and to dispense with all washings until the prints are taken out of the fixing bath, thus saving 80 per cent, of the trouble of working with practically no waste of prints, energy, or temper.



Thursday 26th February 1903  Page 9 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The annual meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held in the rooms of the association, Furlong's Studio, Royal Arcade, last evening. The annual report and balance-sheet disclosed a satisfactory condition of progress during the preceding year. The following office-bearers and council were elected for the present year: President, Mr. J.W. Eggleston; vice-presidents, Messrs. H.C. Mais and R. Ferguson; Hon.Treasurer, E.K. Byrne; Hon.Custodian of apparatus, Mr. H.C. Ward; Hon.Librarian, Mr. J.H. Harvey; Hon.Secretary, Mr. F.W. Miscamble; council, Messrs. E.R. Ferguson, J. Glover, J.T.T. Harding, J.B. Bayless, K.A. Kernot, J. H. Mulvany, H.J. Trowbridge and J. Wilkinson.



Thursday 12th March 1903  Page 9 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

At the monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, held at the society's rooms, Royal-arcade, last evening, a lecture and demonstration was given by Mr. F.A. Kernot on the art of platinotype printing. The artistic possibilities of this simple, beautiful, but little practised process, were lucidly explained and practically illustrated, to the evident satisfaction of a critical and appreciative audience.



21st March 1903  Page 105 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
Mr. F.A. Kernot, on the evening of the 22nd October, showed upwards of 100 lantern slides illustrating the beautiful scenery of Tasmania. The special business of the next meeting held 12th November consisted of an illustrated lecture upon Australian Birds, given by Mr. A.J. Campbell, as representative of the Working Men's College Photographic Club; the lecturer being the author of a well-known text book upon the above subject. A large collection of pictures were projected upon the screen which fully illustrated the habits and modes of bird-life; also the difficulties attending the collecting of the eggs and nests of Australian birds. The lecturer also showed some art studies which were much appreciated.

Mr. Herbert Bickerton, at the special request of the Association, repeated on 26th November his very instructive lecture and demonstration of the Sanger-Shepherd method of photographing color and reproducing results equal to the original by means of lantern slides projected upon the screen. The previous lecture was given on 14th August 1901.

A ladies social was held on 10th December, at which the loan collection of lantern slides of the South Australian Photographic Society was exhibited. Some yachting scenes by Mr. Aitken, and some Japanese views were also shown upon the screen. Messrs. Cresswell, Wicks, Proud and Egan-Lee contributed to the harmony of the evening; the Misses Robertson rendered some concerted music, Mr. J. Madden ably accompanying each item. Refreshments were provided.

At the opening meeting of the New Year, Mr. James Musgrove,of Greenvale (a founder), was elected the first honorary member of the Association in consideration of past services. Mr. Quintin, H.R. Smith, M.A., and Miss Annie H. Moors were elected members, and Messrs, Cooke and Killen auditors. Sample of work brought by the members were criticized and commented upon, which resulted in an interchange of experiences in negative and print making.

Nominations for office-bearers and council were received. The Hon.Secretary drew attention to the library, which was not availed of by the members and that the books and magazines were occupying space in his office which was wanted for other purposes. It was resolved to leave the matter in the hands of the Council to deal with.

The annual meeting was held on the 25th February.

The following office-bearers and Council were elected: President, Mr. J.W. Eggleston; Vice-Presidents, Messrs. H.C. Mais, and Mr. Robert Ferguson; Hon. Treasurer, Mr. E.K. Byrne; Hon. Custodian, Mr. Robert Ferguson; Hon. Librarian, Mr. J.H. Harvey; Hon.Secretary, Mr. F.W. Miscamble; Council, Messrs. E.R. Ferguson, J. Glover, John T.T. Harding, J.B. Hayles, F.A. Kernot, J.H. Mulvaney, H.J. Trowbridge, and J. Wilkinson.

A vote of thanks was unanimously passed to the Hon. Custodian, Mr. H.C. Ward, for his services, as he was compelled to retire from office, which he had held since March 1900, owing to his intended trip to the old country. Mr. Walter Basingthwaite was elected a member. The Hon.Secretary stated that he could accept office for three months only, as it was impossible for him to carry out the duties of the position for another year owing to his business and private engagements. The Hon.Secretary’s report and Treasurer’s balance-sheet were unanimously received and adopted.

SECRETARY’S REPORT FOR PERIOD (9 MONTHS) ENDING 31st DECEMBER 1902
The Council congratulates the members upon the position of the Association; not withstanding the writing off of several members who were considerably in arrears with their subscriptions and the resignations of others the membership roll numbers 93, which is but two less than it was at the last Annual Report.

The special features of the period apart from those disclosed by the syllabus are as follows: Exchange of lantern slides between this Association and the South Australian Photographic Society and between the members per the mediumship of the Association. Presentation of an enlarged photograph of the members assembled at the second annual dinner by Mr. Sears. Revision of rules which are now more in line with present day requirements.

It is with regret that we find ourselves compelled to part with a most valued officer, Mr. H.C. Ward, who intends to visit the old country and at this point it is a matter of still deeper regret that there is so much hesitancy on the part of members generally to come forward and become councilors and office-bearers and so do their part in carrying on the Association, it being a matter of difficulty to get the necessary number nominated to fill the several positions for the ensuing year. Several of the principal office-bearers find it at times an extremely difficult matter to fulfill their various business and private engagements and at the same time carry on the duties of their respective offices year after year.

A competition has been announced for the best six mounted prints and lantern slides, and it is hoped that there will be a large number of entries, the President, Mr. J.W. Eggleston, donating the prizes.

The following subjects were dealt with by non-members: “Australian Birds” lantern lecture by Mr. A.J. Campbell as representative of the Working Men’s College Photographic Club; the “Photography of Color” by Mr. Herbert Bickerton, and the members supplied the following to the syllabus (for nine months): "Toning Bromide Prints", Mr. Robert W. Harvie; “Lighthouses and their Surroundings” by Prof. T.W. Fowler; “Light” by Mr. H.H. Baker; “Stereoscopic Work” by Mr. H.C. Ward; “Astro-Photographical Subjects” by Prof. Pietro Baracchi, Acting Government Astronomer; “Toning P.O.P.”, Mr. Thomas Baker; “Lantern Slide Coloring” by Dr. F. Clendinned; "Development and some Practical Hints on Manipulation" by Mr. Anketell Henderson, M.C.E.; “Tasmanian Scenery” by Mr. F.A. Kernot. There was one conversational night and one lantern night for members only, also a ladies social, smoke night and annual dinner.

At the meeting held 11th March, Mr. J.F. Rocke was elected a member. Mr. J.W. Symons exhibited Eastman’s developing machine. A spool of six 5 x 4 films was developed — the negatives were all satisfactory although varying exposures and subjects. The machine proved that an absolutely correct knowledge of the actinity of light was a "sine qua non" to the Mantalini who relies upon the turning of a handle for the developing of his exposures. It should teach in a somewhat drastic manner the relative value of the size of the stop to the duration of the exposure but the pleasures of working or building up a negative, the retarding or accelerating development are not for the machinists who must rely solely upon their exposures. Mr. Symons was warmly thanked for his demonstration. Mr. F.A. Kernot gave as the special business of the evening a lecture and demonstration of printing in platinum. He carried out the various operations successfully and showed some beautiful specimens of this artistic method of printing. He also described the toning of the prints.




AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
“OUTING PARTY”
by H.J. TROWBRIDGE




21st March 1904  Page 113 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
The annual meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held on 10th February, the report and balance-sheet being adopted unanimously.

The following office-bearers and council were elected: President, Mr. H.C. Mais; Vice Presidents, Messrs. R. Ferguson and E.C. Joshua; Hon.Treasurer, Mr. F.W. Miscamble; Hon. Custodian, Mr. R. Ferguson; Hon. Librarian, Mr. J.H. Harvey; Council (by ballot), Messrs. E.W. Cox, J.W. Eggleston, J.T.T. Harding, J.B. Hayles, F.A. Kernot, J.H. Mulvaney, H.J. Trowbridge and H.C. Ward; Auditors, Messrs, E.H. Coote and J.J Villen.

Mr. C.V. Watts, a founder, was elected an honorary member. A vote of thanks to the retiring officers was suitably responded to by the retiring president, Mr. J.W. Eggleston. Six new members were elected. Mr. Robert W. Harvie gave a practical demonstration, entitled, “Manipulation of Negatives and Double Printing”, affording technical information, which was the result of daily application as an amateur and subsequently as a professional photographer. At the close of the meeting it was announced that the President would give prizes for prints and lantern slides, to be competed for on the lines of the competition held last year.

Prior to the foregoing meeting a special general meeting, convened for the purpose of receiving nominations for the secretaryship, closed without any nominations being received.

On the 9th March a well-attended lantern evening brought forth a large batch of slides, made by Messrs. H.C. Ward and Trowbridge, illustrating the Toolangi district of Victoria, Mr. Ward describing the special features of that not too-well-known beauty spot. Excellent studies (copper-toned slides) were also shown by Mr. J. Glover and a few toned with ammoniate of tin, by Mr. J.T.T. Harding. Imported slides of Japanese and Russian subjects were exhibited by the President and some on behalf of Mr. H.H. Baker. Dr. Henry was elected a member. Immediately following the lantern exhibition the consideration of a special circular issued bv the President was undertaken, and after an animated discussion it was resolved to combine the offices of treasurer and Hon.Secretary and to grant the sum of £8, for this year only, by way of honorarium. Mr. F.W. Miscamble was appointed to the dual office on the nomination of the council.

TWENTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT
The year just closed has, we think, been one of interest and instruction. The following subjects have been treated upon: “Platinum Printing” by Mr. F.A. Kernot; “Negatives and Prints, their Faults and Remedies” by Mr. Robert W. Harvie; “The Illumination of the Dark Room” by Mr. J.T. Harvey; “Practice Notes" by Mr. E.C. Joshua; “Posing and Lighting in Portraiture” by Mr. A.E. Walcott, of the Working Men's College Photographic Club; “Amateur Photography for Pleasure and Use” by Mr. A.M. Henderson. A lantern evening was also held, at which various slides, including colored and telephoto pictures, were shown by Messrs. Ferguson, Hayles, Mais, Proud, Roche and Scott. On another evening Mr. Henderson also read a paper, entitled, “Early Melbourne Architects and their Work", by the late Mr. Lloyd Tayler, F.R.V.I.A., illustrated by lantern slides, the work of the late F.A. Fitts, F.R.V.I.A., and demonstrations were given of the Eastman developing machine by a representative of the Kodak Company and of the autocopyist by Mr. Edmmson, of the the Block Arcade. The experiment was tried of having the meetings monthly instead of fortnightly, and the general opinion seems to be that the change has worked well. Prizes donated by the president were given for both prints and lantern slides, but the competition was disappointing. Although the prize takers in each instance exhibited very excellent work, as did others, the entries were much less in number than the occasion warranted. Outings were also arranged for, some of which were very successful and enjoyable and afforded the members an opportunity of comparing notes and becoming better acquainted with each other; but bad weather and other attractions interfered on several occasions. We think they should be tried again. Several members have expressed a wish that informal meetings might be held, at which they could exchange experiences and exhibit their work in a conversational way. The council would be very pleased to arrange these if they could depend on sufficient support from the members and it depends on you whether they proceed in this direction or not. If a number would undertake to be present and bring work there would be no difficulty and such a procedure would be of great benefit to those attending. The proposal to extend the scope of the association so that members may have a club room open daily with reading and dark rooms, was put before you by circular, but the response received has not justified your council in taking any definite action. This question rests with yourselves and should a sufficient expression of opinion and sufficient promises of support be forthcoming during the present year steps will be taken to carry out the scheme. Being upwards of three years since we have had an exhibition of members work, and a much longer period since an Interstate exhibition was held in this city, it is believed that it is now opportune for such an event to take place. The proposed scheme of union with the Melbourne Camera Club has not, up to the present time, come about. In order to further the amalgamation, the Hon.Secretary of the Melbourne Camera Club was nominated and accepted the office of Hon.Secretary to this association; but it is a matter of regret that he has since declined to act. This pressing difficulty of obtaining a Hon.Secretary who has time, experience, and enthusiasm necessary for the position, which was referred to in our last report, confronts the association, and it is a matter for your consideration whether so important an office shall be always an honorary one. The financial position of the association is satisfactory, there being a surplus of £33 13s. 7d.




21st May 1904  Page 191 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
“How I Expose Bromide” by Mr. E.W, Cox; “Stereo Transparency Work” by Mr. H.C. Ward; “Printing Post Cards” by Mr. J.W. Eggleston; and “My Original Experiment in Pin-hole Photography” by Mr. J.T.T. Harding, are the titles of the lectures and demonstrations which have occupied the last two monthly meetings. Owing to the practical nature of the matter dealt with, good attendances have been the result.

Trips to Alphington and Half Moon Bay have given golden opportunity to those who delight in field work.

Mr. H.C. Ward has been appointed librarian in place of Mr. J.H. Harvey, resigned.

The President’s prize competition for prints and lantern slides closes on the 30th June and there is promise of good entry.

The executive have now under consideration the holding of an exhibition of photographic work and will in all probability invite entries from the other States. The twenty-first anniversary of the association will be held on the 18th June. A great gathering of the old and young, photographically, is expected.




Monday 20th June 1904  Page 6 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)
Saturday 25th June 1904  Page 46 - The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic.)

TWENTY-FIRST ANNIVERSARY
The twenty-first anniversary of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was celebrated by an "At Home" at the Melbourne Coffee Palace, Bourke-street, on Saturday evening. There were about 150 members and friends present; including a number of the original founders of the association and visitors from kindred societies in the country. The president, Mr. H.C. Mais, opened the proceedings by tendering a warm welcome to all present. He was glad, he said, to see so many people around him and trusted that the evening would be a pleasant one. Mr. E.C. Bell acknowledged the welcome on behalf of the guests and took advantage of the opportunity to explain the difference between the old methods of photography in vogue when the society first started and the system followed by amateurs in the present day. Mr. J.H. Harvey, one of the founders, also responded. The objects of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, it was explained, were the exchange of photographs, the interchange of ideas and suggestions relating to photography, the formation of a photographic library and the promotion of a closer acquaintance amongst amateur photographers in this and the other States. The endeavor of the executive was to foster excellence of work and members were encouraged to investigate the varied branches of the photographic art. An interesting program had been prepared. Phonographic selections were given on an instrument lent by Messrs. Baker and Rouse. Animated cinematograph pictures were shown by Mr. H.M. Johnston, recitations were given by Miss A.C. Ouston and Mr. C. Egan-Lee; illustrations of up to date mimicry, in which well-known actors and politicians were included, were contributed by Mr. W. Dunning; magic and mystery found an exponent in Mr. Hurley; songs were rendered by Messrs. Creswell, Kekwick and Proud; xylophone solos by Mr. Clements and a pianoforte solo by Mrs Cuthbert Rigg. A special feature, however, was the exhibition of a series of lantern views, including some very fine slides of flowers, in natural color photography, shown by Mr. J.F. Pattison. During the evening there was an interval for refreshments, which were served in an adjoining room and the whole of the proceedings passed off in a most agreeable manner.



21st July 1904  Page 275 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria celebrated its 21st anniversary or coming of age on the 18th June at the Melbourne Coffee Palace rooms, Bourke street. The council of the society having decided early in the year to celebrate the event, it was specially arranged for in the syllabus and being the oldest photo, society in Australasia no trouble was spared to make it a success. The presidents and secretaries of kindred societies in Victoria each received two invitation cards, also the founders, of whom twelve out of seventeen survivors accepted, the number of gentlemen founding the society was 22.

The Gordon College Photographic Association was represented by Mr. and Mrs. J. Hammerton, junr. and the Working Men's College Photographic Club by Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Relph. The President, Mr. H.C. Mais, M.Inst. C.E., opened the proceedings by welcoming the visitors on behalf of the Society, and after a few remarks explaining the objects of the association called on Mr. Bell and Mr. Harvey to say a few words in reference to the early days of the association, Lantern slides made in the early days by Messrs. E.C. Bell, E.W. Purton, J.J. Fenton, J.H. Harvey, J. McEwan, Jas. Musgrove, were shown on the screen by way of illustrating the advance made in this particular branch during 21 years, also some very beautiful flower studies in natural colors, made by Mr. J. Patterson, of Patterson, Shug, by the Sanger Shepherd process; this was without doubt the most appreciated item on the program.

The cinematograph pictures shown, by Mr. Millard Johnson, were of the most up-to-date and well merited the rounds of applause they received.

The phonograph (lent by Baker and Rouse) songs, recitations, mimicry, magic, music and a coffee supper made up the most enjoyable evening the association has yet held. The long program only just allowed visitors to catch their last trams and trains.

The President, in returning thanks to those who had given their services, referred to the programs which were designed and photographed by Mr. Trowbridge and printed on Austral Pearl paper.

There are two important items in the syllabus for this month on the 13th July: J.W. Lindt, F.R.G.S., “The camera in savageland”, illustrated with some exceptionally fine limelight pictures; on the 27th, Mr. R. Ferguson, on “A trip to America”, illustrated with lantern pictures.

The council are preparing for an inter-colonial exhibition to be held in March or April next and have already several promises of support in the way of prizes. The competition for the President’s prizes for the six Best pictures (any size or process) was won by Mr. Larard, who beat Mr. E.W. Cox by one point. Lantern slides, best six, was won by Mr. Hales, with Mr. Glover a very close second.




Friday 12th August 1904  Page 4 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

One of the members of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, Mr. A.G. Freyett F.R.M.S., delivered a lecture at the monthly meeting on Wednesday upon Stereoscopic Diagrams, showing the anatomy of the arteries of the human body, illustrated by means of a Wheatstone stereoscope. The prints were exceptionally large. One print showed a hydatid lung in situ. The whole of the arteries of the human body, inclusive of the internal organs, were made very distinct and could be clearly traced from their origin to their terminals. The infected specimens of the lung were of exceptional interest. The lecturer stated that all this work had been carried out at the Melbourne University.



22nd August 1904  Page 312 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
RADIUM AND PHOTOGRAPHY
Mr. H.H. Baker, of W. Watson and Sons, gave a lecture on "Radium and Photography" on 8th June, and exhibited a few radiographs which had been taken by himself and others by means of the new element. At the outset the lecturer remarked that it was unlikely that radium would ever be largely used for the purposes of photography, owing to its extreme rarity and consequent high price.

It was, however, probable that other substances would be found to possess the property of radio-activity and if the first discovery of such activity was made by exposing photographic plates to the action of likely substances, there was an opportunity for photographers to break fresh ground in this new field of scientific investigation. A short account was then given of the discovery of radium, the method in which it was extracted from the mass of pitchblend, in which it exists in microscopical quantities and the various manners in which its activity was exhibited. Although only a few grammes of radium have hitherto been extracted from many tons of pitchblend, this small quantity in the hands of enthusiastic workers had already achieved marvellous results. The atomic theory as held and thought to be fairly established, during the past century, was being altered to account for the new phenomena. To explain the radiations from radium it became necessary to allow that the indestructible atom (as hitherto conceived) was capable of disintegration.

Also, there was reason to suppose that by the breaking down of the atoms of Radium, other smaller atoms were given off which presented the characteristics of helium, a quite different element. This has suggested that all matter may be derived from a common stock, or protyle and it may be that modern science will yet demonstrate the possibility of the transmutation of metals. Radium is found to give out three distinct kinds of radiation which are referred to respectively as the Alpha, Beta, and Gamma rays. Taking them in the reverse order, the Gamma rays consists of ethereal vibrations and account for the phosphorescent light and the heat which are given off. In addition there are rays similar to the X-rays which will penetrate dense substances and affect a photographic plate. The Beta rays consist of material particles similar to the Cathode stream in a Vacuum tube through which an electric current is passed. These particles are shot off at a great velocity, are charged with negative electricity, will penetrate many substances opaque to light and will impress themselves upon a photographic plate.

The size of the particles is about 1/10 that of a hydrogen atom. The Alpha rays consist of particles of matter much larger than those in the Beta rays, having a charge of positive electricity, and their course is arrested by the interposition of any dense substance. In addition to these radiations, there is a gaseous emanation which can be collected and stored and which after a few days shews the ordinary spectrum of helium.

Mr, Baker exhibited some spinthariscope instruments devised by Professor Crookes to illustrate ocularly the activity of Radium. The spinthariscope consists of a brass box, in the upper end of which is a Coddington Lens. At the lower end is a brass pointer upon which is a minute speck of Radium bromide. Beneath the pointer is a small disc of zinc sulphide. This screen flouresces when subjected to the radiations and when viewed through the lens shows a multitude of sparks which light up momentarily, but continuously as the bombardment from the Radium goes on. Although the quantity of Radium in this instrument is very minute (not exceeding 1/10th of a milligram), the radiations from it will penetrate through opaque envelopes and fog a photographic plate. Another contrivance known as the Radium Screen has been placed upon the market for such as desire to test the effect of rays upon a dry plate. The screen appears to consist of powdered pitch blend strewed upon a piece of cardboard and surrounded by a wooden frame. These screens are sold for a few shillings, in quarter and half-plate sizes.

Although the activity is much less than in the case of pure radium, satisfactory results can be obtained with long exposures. As radio-activity has been found to exist in water from wells and in air from caves, it is not unlikely that Radium may be more widely distributed than was recently thought to be the case. If this activity has not been communicated to the air and water from radium (which has the property of causing other substances in its vicinity to become radio-active), it may be that other circumstances have brought about the result. As the subject is yet in its initial stages, there is without doubt room for any observers who have the taste and necessary patience for experimental research to bring to light fresh facts which will add to our knowledge regarding radio-activity.

Mr. H.J. Trowbridge read a paper forwarded by Messrs. Burroughs, Wellcome and Co., of Sydney, describing - TABLOID PHOTOGRAPHIC CHEMICALS - and projected upon the screen some forty slides showing the effect of their lantern slide developing and toning tabloids. The special qualities, actions and effects of the several developers, restrainers, accelerators, preservatives, toning baths, reducers and intensifies made up in tabloid, form were fully explained in the lecture, as were also some considerable observations upon time development. A vote of thanks to Messrs. Burroughs, Wellcome and Co., was carried with acclamation.

On the 13th July, there was a very large attendance to hear Mr. J.W. Lindt, F.R.G.S., the author of an illustrated work on British New Guinea, give a lecture upon his travels in that place. Mr. Lindt described an excursion to the Upper Laloki River and a visit to a village inhabited by members of the Koiari tribe which dwells among the foothills of the Astrolabe Ranges. Apart from the interest which Mr. Lindt’s personal experiences aroused, the lecturer dwelt on and elucidated many of the technical points, which are of paramount importance to make the photographic part of an expedition a tolerable certainty. The slides which were used to illustrate the lecture were artistic in their conception and well chosen to fit in with the text. A vote of thanks to the lecturer, proposed by the President of the Association, was heartily responded to. An extra meeting on the 27th July was well attended notwithstanding the inclement weather.

The prizes recently won in the Presidents Competition were presented to the winners: Messrs. A. Larard (prints), and J.B. Hayles (slides): all the entries being on view. Messrs. A. Barrie, of Talma, and J. Ford were the judges. The runners up were Messrs. E.W. Cox and J.B. Hayles in the print section, and Mr. J. Glover in the lantern slide section.

The special business of the evening was an illustrated account of a “Trip to America” by Mr. Robert Ferguson, one of the Vice Presidents of the Association, who has but recently returned from a visit to that land of “big things". As the slides were projected upon the screen the lecturer gave much valuable and interesting information respecting the places he had visited, the principal of which were New York, Chicago, Boston and St. Louis. Many expressed the wish that another instalment of pictures would be welcome and the lecturer promised to comply when the opportunity was offered. The outings of the Association take place monthly and the results are shown at the following general meeting.

The following new members have been recently elected: Messrs. W.C. Craigie, Neil Campbell, R.N. Findlay, C. Hardie, O. Joseph, H.C. Slocombe, Dr. Henry, Mrs. Cox, Mrs. Proud, Miss Grindlay, Miss Hope Rees, Messrs. J.A. Sears, W.L. Edmunson, L. Cooper, J. Chapman and C. Holmes.




21st November 1904  Page 436 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
The promises of support given by members and friends to make the forthcoming Photographic Art Exhibition, to be held in February next, a success, have been accorded in a whole-hearted manner. The venue (the galleries of the Victorian Artists Society) is specially favorable. It is desired that the majority of the exhibits shall be illustrative of the possibilities of photography from an artistic point of view; therefore the pictorial exhibits will greatly exceed those that are recording only. It is anticipated that some valuable loan collections will also be shown. A special section, No. 2A, has been arranged for the members of kindred societies in the States and New Zealand.

The monthly outings of the Association are consistently attended by an enthusiastic band of workers and the results are on the whole very gratifying. “Stereoscopic Skiagrams, Illustrated by means of the Wheatstone Stereoscope”, was the title of a lecture delivered by Mr. A.G. Fryett, F.R.M.S., at the August meeting. The prints were exceptionally large, one showing a hydatid in the lung in situ. The whole of the arteries of the human body, inclusive of the internal organs, were made very distinct and could be clearly traced from their origin to their terminals. The infected specimens of the lung were of exceptional interest. The lecturer stated that the work had been carried out at the Melbourne University.

At the September meeting, Mr. H.C. Ward exhibited a large number of slides illustrating “A Trip to the Old Country”, from which he had but recently returned. Many scenes possessing great historic interest, as well as those which were renowned for their picturesqueness, were shown and described by the lecturer. With but few exceptions the lantern slides were made by Mr. Ward from photographs taken by a hand camera of his own making while on the trip.

The prospectuses of the Exhibition were distributed at the October meeting, after which the “Manipulation of the Lantern” was explained in detail by Mr. F.A. Kernot. The history of the development of the optical lantern, the advantages and disadvantages of the various illuminants, the methods used to obtain the lights, also the several kinds of saturators, carriers and accessories, were fully described. The lecturer recommended that when showing in public all parts of the apparatus should be in duplicate as far as possible and a thorough ventilation of the room in which the show was being held was absolutely necessary for the comfort and health of those being entertained. Mr. Kernot manipulated the various lantern lights and accessories during the course of his lecture and at the conclusion showed some zoological transparencies. Mrs. Moss and Mr. Hy. Goldman were elected members.




21st January 1905  Page 2 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
THE INTERSTATE PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBITION
The 31st January 1905 is the date the committee have fixed as the last day for receiving exhibits for the Interstate Exhibition, to be held next month in Melbourne. We are looking forward for good things in connection with this event and sincerely hope each State has liberally responded to the appeal the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria has made for co-operation. These interstate exhibitions have a far-reaching effect, not only in matters that pertain to photography, but they tend to create a healthy feeling of interstate fellowship between the citizens of the States, which finds its way into other fields of labor and help to brush aside much of the undesirable provincialisms too often seen and felt in the political atmosphere throughout the Commonwealth. At such times we get to know each other better and realize more fully we are, after all, under the same flag. We are pleased to know from the Secretary of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria that the Royal Photographic Society of Great Britain, with which the Association is affiliated, has promised a non-competitive collection of 54 pictures by some of the most expert workers of Great Britain, also a lecture with slides and a set of pictorial slides. As, from the list forwarded, medal pictures by photographers of world-wide reputation will be on view, much may be learnt by the earnest workers of the association as well as by the general public. The Autotype Company has also forwarded a magnificent collection of examples of its well-known productions Mr. Chas Reid, of Wishaw, sends a collection of his world-renowned pictures.



TEAMSTERS — YARRA TRACK
by E.W. COX
Section 2A, Class 3. 1st Award




Tuesday 14th February 1905  Page 4 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The judging of exhibits in the Inter-State Photographic Exhibition, in the Victorian Artists Galleries, Albert-street, was completed last evening. The exhibition will be opened on Monday next, at 4pm, by Sir John Madden, when the president and council of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria entertain the invited guests at afternoon tea.


SIR JOHN MADDEN

Born 16th May 1844 Cloyne, Cork, Ireland
Died 10th March 1918 South Yarra, Melbourne, Victoria




Thursday 16th February 1905  Page 4 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The exhibition of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, which is to be opened at the Victorian Artists Gallery on Monday next, supplies a page of very fine examples of pictorial photography. The examples selected embrace landscape, seascape, floral, figure and genre subjects and are admirably reproduced. The Methodist Boys Home at East Burwood is illustrated by a pleasing series of views, which give a good idea of the home and its surroundings and the system of training the boys. The photography of the Leongatha show includes a general view of the grounds, a group of the officials and a number of very fine horse exhibits. Portraits are given of the Revs. A.R. Edgar and G.H. Cole, principals of the Burwood Boys Training Home; Mr. Auguste van Biene, the actor musician; and Messrs. Shrubb and Duffy, the champion athletes. There is also a group of the pupils of the Gold-street State school at Clifton Hill, who established a record in scholarships. Not the least interesting of the pictures are the snapshots of the Chinese picnic, which took place last week at Aspendale, giving many of the scenes and incidents of the day. A view of the circus elephants recently imported by Messrs. Fitzgerald Bros, completes a varied list of subjects.



Saturday 18th February 1905  Page 36 - Leader (Melbourne, Vic.)

The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, which is affiliated with the Royal Photographic Society of Great Britain, will open a very fine exhibition of pictorial photography on Monday next in the galleries of the Victorian Artists Society, in Albert-street. There are altogether about 500 exhibits, 100 of which have been sent from Great Britain. There are some fine examples from South Africa by Mrs Minna Keene, authoress of "Keene's Nature Studies". Altogether the work is of a very high class character. The judges, who consisted of two artists and a photographer, express the opinion that the exhibition shows a distinct advance in pictorial works as rendered by photography and state that a very high standard in this direction has now been reached. We have illustrated in this issue of "The Leader" a number of the photographs at the exhibition. Some of the pictures which have been adjudged the most artistic are two impressionist for effective reproduction in our pages.



Monday 20th February 1905  Page 7 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Tuesday 21st February 1905  Page 6 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

When formally declaring open the exhibition of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria at the galleries of the Victorian Artists Society yesterday, Sir John Madden confessed that his part in photography up to the present had been "ludicrous". He did not, however, satisfy the curiosity of the audience with a detailed narrative explaining the use of the adjective; he merely added that the failure was one of the most conspicuous that should meet with his self-reproach. Then proceeding on more general lines he said he had always been an admirer and he hoped only at times a victim of photography. They must all acknowledge the valuable aid which photography had rendered the sciences by the exactness with which it recorded things desirable to be recorded. Indeed it would be difficult to say which particular branch of science was not very greatly aided by photography. He congratulated the society upon the excellence of the work of its members and expressed a hope that the exhibition would be successful from every standpoint. The galleries will remain open each day till Saturday 25th February, from 2pm to 6pm and 7.30pm and 10pm and musical selections, vocal and instrumental, will be contributed daily by artists.


SIR JOHN MADDEN

Born 16th May 1844 Cloyne, Cork, Ireland
Died 10th March 1918 South Yarra, Melbourne, Victoria



THE AWARDS
The prize list is as follows:

SECTION II: ONLY OPEN TO MEMBERS OF THE
AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA

LANDSCAPES:

SEASCAPES:

ENLARGEMENTS:

FIRST
J. Temple Stephens
SECOND
J. Temple Stephens
THIRD
D.W. Paterson
FIRST
J.B. Hayles
SECOND
E.C. Joshua
THIRD
E.C. Joshua
FIRST
J. Temple Stephens
SECOND
E.C. Joshua
THIRD
E.W. Cox

PORTRAITS:

STILL LIFE:

STEREOSCOPIC
PRINTS:

LADIES CLASS
(STILL LIFE):

PICTORIAL
POSTCARDS:

LANTERN
SLIDES:

ANIMAL LIFE:

FIRST
D.W. Paterson
SECOND
E.C. Joshua
FIRST
Miss Agnes Thomson
FIRST
J.B. Hayles
FIRST
Miss Agnes Thomson
FIRST
Captain H. Press
FIRST
H.J. Trowbridge
SECOND
E.C. Joshua
FIRST
Miss Agnes Thomson

GENRE:

HAND CAMERA PHOTOGRAPHS:

STEREOSCOPIC
TRANSPARENCIES:

CLOUDS:

FIRST
J. Temple Stephens
SECOND
J. Temple Stephens
THIRD
J. Temple Stephens
FIRST
E.C. Joshua
SECOND
E.C. Joshua

FIRST
H.J. Trowbridge

FIRST
E.C. Joshua

BEST PICTURE TAKEN AT AN OUTING
OF THE ASSOCIATION DURING
1903-1904:

GOLD MEDAL:

CHALLENGE SHIELD and
GOLD MEDAL FOR
BEST PICTURE IN THE SECTION:

FIRST
Miss Agnes Thomson

FIRST
J. Temple Stephens, "Sand Dunes"

FIRST
D.W. Paterson, for portrait "Grandpa"

SECTION IIA: OPEN TO MEMBERS OF KINDRED AMATEUR SOCIETIES IN AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND:

LANDSCAPES:

SEASCAPES:

ENLARGEMENTS:

STILL LIFE:

FIRST
James S. Stening
New South Wales
SECOND
W. Churchill Fisher
New South Wales
THIRD
James Hornby
Ballarat East
FIRST
James S. Stening
New South Wales
SECOND
James S. Stening
New South Wales
FIRST
E.W. Cox
Flemington
SECOND
E.A. Whitehead
Broken Hill
FIRST
Thos. G. Campbell
Toorak
SECOND
Murray Thomson
South Australia

PORTRAITS:

PICTORIAL
POSTCARDS:

LANTERN
SLIDES:

ANIMAL LIFE:

GENRE:

HAND
CAMERA:

CLOUDS:

GOLD MEDAL
FOR THIS SECTION
FOR THE BEST PICTURE:

FIRST
A.J. Campbell
Armadale
FIRST
D.S. Lord
Geelong
FIRST
H.J. Trowbridge
North Fitzroy
FIRST
W. Churchill Fisher
New South Wales
FIRST
W. Churchill Fisher
New South Wales
FIRST
Walter E. Gates
New South Wales
FIRST
James. S. Stening
New South Wales
FIRST
James. S. Stening
"The Edge of the Common"

SECTION III (OPEN TO ALL PHOTOGRAPHERS):

LANDSCAPES:

SEASCAPES:

ENLARGEMENTS:

FIRST
J. Temple Stephens
Victoria
SECOND
J. Kauffmann
South Australia
THIRD
F.A. Joyner
South Australia
FIRST
J. Kauffmann
South Australia
SECOND
A.H. Kingsborough
South Australia
THIRD
J. Kauffmann
South Australia
FIRST
J. Temple Stephens
Victoria
SECOND
J. Temple Stephens
Victoria
THIRD
J. Temple Stephens
Victoria

PORTRAITS:

STILL LIFE:

PICTORIAL
POSTCARDS:

LANTERN SLIDES
(SETS OF THREE):

STEREOSCOPIC
TRANSPARENCIES:

ANIMAL LIFE:

FIRST
F.W. Appleby
Sydney
FIRST
Miss Lily E. Kingsborough
South Australia
FIRST
Harold Hill
Sheffield, England
SECOND
Shef Hill
Sheffield, England
THIRD
H. Wormfield
England
FIRST
Dr. Hugh E. Paterson
SECOND
Harold Leighton
Leicester, England
FIRST
H.J. Trowbridge
Victoria
FIRST
F.A. Joyner
South Australia

GENRE:

HAND CAMERA:

BAKER AND ROUSE'S
£5 5/ PRIZE FOR BEST
PRINT ON AUSTRAL PEARL PAPER:

GOLD MEDAL OF
THE SECTION:

FIRST
D.W. Paterson
Victoria
SECOND
F.W. Proctor
New South Wales
THIRD
F.A. Joyner
South Australia
FIRST
E.C. Joshua
Victoria
SECOND
E.C. Joshua
Victoria

FIRST
E.A. Whitehead, Broken Hill

FIRST
J. Temple Stephens, Victoria


Judges Notes: The judges desire to express their opinion on the distinct advance in pictorial work as rendered by photography and believe that a very high water mark of excellence in this direction has now been reached. They find that many are now benefiting from their study of the works of the world renowned masters. They strongly recommend that a picture should compete in one class only.



Monday 20th February 1905  Page 6 - The Daily Telegraph (Sydney NSW)

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBITION
MELBOURNE, Friday: An Inter-State exhibition of amateur photographs, conducted under the auspices of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria will be opened on Monday. The collection on view includes exhibits from England, Scotland, South Africa, and other places abroad, as well as from all Australian States. Messrs. J. Ford Patterson, Fred M'Cubbin, and A. Barrie, the judges, have awarded the following prizes out of a collection numbering over 700: Champion picture, "Sand Dunes", by J. Temple Stephens, Melbourne, gold medal for best picture in the Victorian Society's section as well as in the open section; challenge shield, W.W. Patterson, of Melbourne, for picture shown by a member of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria; prize of £5 5s for best enlargement on Austral pearl paper, awarded to E.A. Whitehead, Broken-hill, New South Wales; gold medal for best picture in section,open to kindred societies, awarded to James S. Stening, secretary of the Photographic Society of New South Wales. Three English amateurs, Dr. Hugh E. Paterson, Harold Hill (both of Sheffield) and H. Wormneighton, of Leicester, took three awards in the open section for lantern slides. Captain Press, Melbourne, won the first prize for post cards. A collection of beautiful portraits, sent by F. Monteath, of Brisbane, unfortunately arrived too late for competition.



Monday 20th February 1905  Page 2 - The Ballarat Star (Melbourne, Vic.)

The amateur photographic exhibition which will be opened at Melbourne by Sir John Madden this afternoon seems to be creating a great deal of attention amongst artists. The exhibition, which will be held at the Victorian Artists Galleries, is being conducted under the auspices of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria. Over 700 exhibits, which come from England, Scotland and South Africa, as well as from Australasia, have been received and many of them are of a high standard of work. The most striking landscape exhibited is "Sand Dunes", by Mr. J. Temple, of Melbourne and has been awarded a gold medal. The Challenge Cup for portraiture has been carried off by Mr. W.W. Paterson, of Melbourne. Other prize-winners were Mr. E.A. Whitehead, of Broken Hill, for enlargement on Austral Pearl paper; Mr. James S. Stening, Hon.Secretary of Photographic Society of New South Wales, for the section for exhibits from kindred societies; Captain Press, of Melbourne, for postcards; Mr. E.C. Joshua, of Melbourne, for hand camera work and three English amateurs, Dr. H.E. Paterson, Messrs H. Hill and K. Wormneighton, for lantern slides. Other prize-winners were Messrs F.A. Joyner, J. Kauffmann, A.H. Kingsborough and Miss L. Kingsborough, all of Adelaide and Miss A. Thompson, of Melbourne.



21st February 1905  Page 41 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
THE INTERSTATE PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBITION
Our Pictures this month are prize winners at the Exhibition held on the 20th February, in Melbourne, under the auspices of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria. The collection on view at the Exhibition included pictures from England, Scotland, South Africa and all the Australian States. From every point of view the Exhibition appears to have been a success. The judges, J. Ford Patterson, Fred. M‘Cubbin and A. Barrie, in making their awards say: “We are of opinion there is a distinct advance in pictorial work, as rendered by photography and believe that a very high water-mark of excellence in this direction has now been reached. We find that many are now benefiting from their study of the works of the world-renowned masters. We strongly recommend that a picture should compete in one class only.



A PROUD MOTHER
by MISS AGNES THOMSON

Section 2, Class 9. 1st Award




21st February 1905  Page 41 - Part 1 - The Australasian Photographic Review
21st March 1905  Page 83 - Part 2 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
THE INTERSTATE PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBITION
PART 1

The 1905 Exhibition of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, just held in Melbourne, marks a distinct advance in Australian photography. This Association is now affiliated with the Royal Photographic Society of Great Britain, which has sent out a large loan collection to the Exhibition. The educational value of such a collection and the opportunities for comparison of British with Australian work must of course be great. The British work, generally speaking, is characterized by a broader style of treatment, approaching, in one or two instances, to fuzzy graphic impressionism; but the photographs are in most cases apt illustrations of artistic thought and composition. It is only due to add that the local photographs are by no means outclassed by those from England, but bear very favorable comparison in technical excellence and artistic treatment.

It is in what we may call the art aspect of photography that the present Victorian Exhibition shows such a marked advance. The amateurs are no longer content to simply “fire away” and secure a record of a scene or a face. They now seem to study composition, they put thought and feeling into their work, with the result that most of their pictures in this Exhibition are entitled to be “pictures” as well as photographs. It is evident that the numerous hand-books upon the artistic side of photography, commencing with H.P. Robinson’s “Pictorial Effect in Photography", have borne good fruit and have tended to give to photographers the “seeing eye" of the artist. It is not merely in landscape that this improvement is visible; it is equally and even more creditably conspicuous in portraiture. A good instance is the portrait “Grandpa”, for which Mr. D.W. Paterson has been awarded first gold medal and the challenge shield. The characterization is excellent and the lighting artistically handled. The features of the face stand out in bold relief, whilst the hair and head are cleverly subordinated and fade into the background. In old-time days of Cheap-Jackery the photographer would have given as much prominence to “each particular hair” as to the features that make the likeness. Another vigorous specimen of portraiture is a large head of Mr. D. Allan and is the work of Mr. L.W. Appleby, of New South Wales.

In the landscape section, Mr. J. Temple Stephens has been very and deservedly successful. His “Sand Dunes” has been awarded the championship of the Exhibition and has received three “firsts” and two gold medals, one for the section open to members of the Association and another in the open section. It is a fine specimen of outdoor work, is treated artistically and is characterized by excellent “atmosphere”. For his picture “The Harrow”, Mr. Stephens scores two “firsts" and a “second”; for his “Green Pastures and Still Waters” a “second” and “third”; for two typical Australian scenes, entitled “Burning Off" and “Homewards”, a “second” and “third” respectively. Miss Agnes Thomson (Victoria) has been successful in securing first award in all the sections in which she competed, viz, Still Life, Ladies Class, Animals and Best Picture at Outings of the Association. Another prominent prize taker is Mr. E.C. Joshua, of Melbourne, who has secured three “firsts”, five “seconds” and one “third”. Mr. Joshua is an enthusiastic and energetic worker, as may be gathered from the fact that his awards include hand camera pictures, seascapes, clouds, enlargements and portraits.

New South Wales has several prize winners in Messrs. James S. Stening (gold medal, three first awards and a second), E.A. Whitehead (one first and a second), F.W. Proctor (a second), L.W. Appleby (previously referred to), W. Churchill-Fisher (two firsts and a second) and W.E. Gates, who gained the first prize in his section for hand camera work. South Australia can also boast of several prize-winners in Miss Kingsborough, Messrs. A.H. Kingsborough, J. Kauffmann and F. Joyner. It will thus be seen that the 1905 Exhibition may be regarded as thoroughly Australian and with the British loan collection and a number of fine enlargements of New Zealand and Tasmanian scenery, the display is even a cosmopolitan one.

Not the least noteworthy feature of the Exhibition is the advances that have been made in printing and the manipulation of the up-to-date papers which have rendered enlargements an easy and inexpensive process for amateurs and indeed professionals who do not care to go to the trouble of making an enlarged negative for use with printing-out paper. A number of enlargements 30 x 40 of New Zealand scenery are shown on Austral pearl paper. Nothing could be finer; the beautiful egg-shell matt-surface of pearl paper give a finely soft and artistic effect and at the same time softening down the granularity in separable from enlargements of several magnifications. The velvetty blacks and soft grays are by no means the limitations of pearl paper, for toned bromides are advancing by leaps and bounds. An enlargement of Corra Linn, Tasmania, by Sears, of Melbourne, is shown. It is on Pearl Paper and has been toned to a rich brown and is scarcely distinguishable from a sun-printed picture on fine matt silver paper.

THE INTERSTATE PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBITION
PART 2

The Exhibition which, viewed from every standpoint, was the most successful photographic display ever exhibited in the Commonwealth and reflected the highest credit on the foresight and tact of the Council of Management. Their indefatigable labors were, we were glad to see, well appreciated by all concerned and the general public. While on this topic we cannot omit giving the good president his mete of praise. From start to finish his efforts by night and day must have added considerably to the general success. It is admitted on all sides that the display of pictures in all photographic processes was of the best and well up-to-date. But in the awards we must express a strong opinion as to the wisdom of allowing one picture to compete in more than one section. We have no desire to in any way detract from the merits of the exhibit “Sand Dunes”, but we honestly think the council were at fault in admitting it to compete in several sections. However, this may be only a matter of opinion; but we are by no means alone in this judgment.

The exhibits of the professional photographers were very fine, especially those in pigment and gum-bi chromate, the work of Johnson O’Shannessy, Talma, Swiss Studios, Sears Studio, T. Humphrey, “The Burlington”, W. Appleby, N.S.W., and F. Monteith, Brisbane.

In the demonstration room of the south gallery the loan section — the pictures from the Autotype Co., of London, C. Reid, of Wishaw, Kodak, Ltd., and Baker and Rouse, Ltd., were conspicuously fine.

By way of entertainment and instruction, Mr. D.W. Paterson gave a highly interesting lecture on the “Sangar-Shepherd Process”. The screen pictures were the most beautiful of the kind we have ever had the pleasure of seeing, particularly those of the floral combinations.

Another interesting feature of the Exhibition and one which attracted much interest and attention, was the scientific lecture given by Mr. A.G. Fryett on X Ray work. Here the audience had the opportunity of viewing through the Wheatstone stereoscope attachment the Skiagraph, producing the most perfect stereoscope effects. Mr. F.A. Kernot's lecture on X Ray work was also highly appreciated and very instructive.

But while the wants of the scientific, intellectual and seeing faculties of the members and visitors were being supplied on such grand fare, we were pleased to notice that Miss Mais, the much esteemed daughter of the good president, was ably and busily employed in looking after the wants of her fair sisters by supplying, in her very acceptable manner, afternoon teas, a want that rules intellect and science. The Exhibition is now a matter of history, but leaves behind a record worthy of the occasion and which will for many years to come, suggest pleasant memories of a very enjoyable and highly instructive photographic week.



MARSHLANDS
by MISS AGNES THOMSON

Section 2, Class 16. 1st Award




Tuesday 21st February 1905  Page 5 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

Lady Madden, who had intended to be present yesterday at the opening of the annual exhibition of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, was too unwell, Sir John Madden stated, when declaring the exhibition open, to leave Frankston in order to attend the ceremony.



THE EDGE OF THE COMMON
by JAMES S. STENING

Section 2A, Class 1. 1st Award



A SAD SKYE
by F.A. KERNOT

Section 2, Class 3.



SUNLIGHT AND SHADOW
by A.J. PERIER

Section 3, Class 9.



AN AUTUMN EVENING
by JAMES S. STENING

Section 2A, Class 15. 1st Award




Thursday 23rd February 1905  Page 7 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION of VICTORIA - ANNUAL EXHIBITION
Two large rooms and the gallery about the staircase are devoted to the large collection of photographs on view in connection with the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, at the Victorian Artist's Galleries, Albert street, East Melbourne. In the main room are some fine bromide enlargements of New Zealand scenery and autotypes of an Indian temple, in which the sharp lights and shadows are produced with admirable effect, a pass in the Himalayas and a very interesting study of Windsor Castle, from a new aspect. Exhibits have been received from all the states and the collection sent from Brisbane by F. Monteath includes an excellent life size portrait of the Archdeacon of Brisbane and several other figures pictures. A large number of prizes have been awarded and New South Wales and South Australia are well represented. In the former state, Mr. Appleby shows some fine work, notably a portrait of Alfred Allen Esq, "The Witches Hour" and "A Pathway Through the Woods". Mr. Churchill Fisher is equally successful in "Ebbtide and Fading Light" and "Across the Creek". Mr. James J. Stening, who won a gold medal for his "Edge of the Common", a graceful effect gained with a stream, overarching trees and a soft, warm evening light, also shows other delicate and effective work, his "Autumn Evening", with a calm sea, sunset clouds and fishing boats being a very clever and artistic study. Others of his are "An Angry Sea", "The Drinking Place" and "South Coast". Mr. F.W. Proctor's figure, "The Smoker", is good. From South Australia Mr. Joyner sends several fine figure studies. His "Laundress" and "Sheep in the Park" are excellent, while in "Waiting and Watching" the arrangement of light and shade is very clear and the pose of the girl at the window simple and natural. "The Trial Trip", showing two sturdy boys launching a small boat, is well worth notice. Mr. J. Kauffmann's "After Sunrise" is a fine picture and "The Old Homestead" and "Winter Mist" are beautifully finished. Miss Lily Kingsborough sends some effective flower studies and gains first prize for her "Marguerites". Mr. Kingsborough shows a number of good pictures. "When the Hours of Day are Numbered" being a prize winner. Mr. Murray Thomson's "Flower Studies" is well worth notice.


JOHN KAUFFMANN

Born 29th December 1864 Truro, South Australia
Died 29th November 1942 South Yarra, Melbourne



Among Victorian exhibitors, the most notable work is done by Mr. E.C. Joshua, Mr. Temple Stephens and Miss Agnes Thomson. Mr. Joshua's "Elwood Evening" and "On The Lower Yarra" being among the most interesting studies in the collection. "Winter", "The Billiard Player" and "Low Tide" are also very good. Mr. Stephen's "Sand Dunes" is very fine and "The Harrow" and "Youth and the Future" are excellent. Miss Thomson's "Proud Mother" attracts instant notice. Marshland's "On the Yarra", "Evening" and "On the Creek" show good work, intimate technical knowledge being combined with artistic skill. Mr. E.W. Cox's "Yarra Track" is a fine picture. Mr. John B. Hayles has achieved success with "Homeward" and his "Narberhong" is a clever study. Mr. E.J. Hughes sends a number of exhibits from New Zealand and though not a prize winner, his pictures are good, more especially in "The Suspension Bridge" and "Green Lake". Mr. D.W. Patterson gains the gold medal challenge shield for a portrait called "Grampa". A large number of exhibits have been sent from England and though nearly all are small studies, they form a very attractive feature. Many of them are gems and not only offer examples of the trend of English artistic photography, but are pictures of places of general interest. Thus we have interiors of the Cathedrals of Lincoln and Chester, St. Sebastian's Chapel, "Abbeydore", "In Wicksworth Church"; also "A Welsh Valley", "Poole Harbour", "Paglesham Pool", "A Warwickshire Village". The landscapes are nearly all on a much smaller scale than those attempted by Australian photographers and the whole number of 54 English pictures occupy quite a small space, but they are delicate and dainty and "The Barley Field", "The River Bank", "By the Derbyshire Wye", "The Marshes Frozen", "The Storm Lifting" are delightful and will repay much study from both the photographer and artistic points of view. During the afternoon and evening arrangements have been made for obtaining tea and light refreshments. This evening Mr. J. Patterson will give a lecture on the method of natural color photography, illustrated by lantern slides. To-morrow evening an exhibition of the X-ray apparatus will be given and on Saturday evening there will be a cinematograph entertainment and musical selections by the Zingam Amateur Orchestra.



Thursday 23rd February 1905  Page 6 - Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic.)

Sir John Madden formally opened the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria's Exhibition, at the Victorian Artists Society Galleries, Eastern Hill, last Monday, afternoon. His speech, as usual, was most happy and to the point, although he acknowledged that as a photographer he was a dismal failure. Sir John apologized for Lady Madden, who was too indisposed to attend.


SIR JOHN MADDEN

Born 16th May 1844 Cloyne, Cork, Ireland
Died 10th March 1918 South Yarra, Melbourne, Victoria



After the formal opening the round of the exhibits was made and afternoon tea, with a particularly dainty and varied menu was served in the South Gallery. The exhibition is truly excellent and proves that photography has reached a very high point and made great progress, not only as an aid to astronomy, histology, pathology and other sciences, but from an art point. Many of the exhibits are real pictures, with truly good art points. For instance, "Sand Danes", by Mr. Temple Stephens, which secured three firsts and two gold medals. It is a true picture and conveys the spirit of the sandy wastes admirably. His "Burning Off" is also a picture and is typically Australian in character. Some of the landscapes are very beautiful and would well replace many of the photogravures and engravings as decorations for a home. "On the Upper Yarra" by D.W. Paterson, is one of these and is charming, so is his "Backwater on the Yarra" and "Yackandandah". "Gloomy Winter" by Gordon Mongomery, is another. "The Sunlit Harbour", Albert J. Perrier, is a beautiful study in cool gray tones and "When the Sun is Gone", H.E. Perfect, is yet, another which wins much admiration. "The Park", which secured first prize, is full of detail and the shadows are very fine. "A Southerly Blow, Bondi", is a picture which arrests attention, for the tossing huge waves are beautifully shown. "As the Sun was Setting" is beautiful in another way; both are by T. Cummin. "Road, Amherst" and "Bridge, Eurobin Creek", by E.W. Cox, are among those which win special favor. There are two small pictures of billiard players, which show admirable lighting and the prize "A Smoker", has quite a Rembrandtesque effect, for all the light is supplied apparently by the match just struck and it is printed in warm yellow red tones. "The Western Wave was all Aflame" is a decided photographic novelty. It is in an orange red tone. "Grandpa", which secured gold medal and shield, is rather dimly and obscurely printed in sepia tones, with the figure more suggested than fully defined. It is more like a chalk sketch than a portrait and from an art point of view is good. Indeed, to the casual amateur photographer the prizes seem to have been awarded more from the artistic point than anything. When one has learned to regard the now fashionable, rather undefined photography, with its suggestion of being slightly out of focus, as excellent, the allotment of prizes can be better understood. It is certainly more allied to high art than when clearness and distinctness of outline is more insisted upon, but photographers generally aim at securing this clearness. The English exhibits show some beautiful work and more clearly and evenly printed and toned on the whole than the Australian pictures. They are uniformly and simply framed, with no mount showing, a point which the committee would do well to insist upon with our work for either they should be judged before being framed unmounted, or they should be set off in some uniform and unpretentious fashion, as are the English exhibits. Such a rule has another real advantage, too, for it means saving a space. In the judges report appears: "The judges strongly recommend that in future no picture be allowed to compete in more than one class". This should be made much stronger and should be enforced as a rule. A picture is awarded a gold medal for the best picture. So naturally, when it is entered again in other classes the judges must in every case award it first prize or reverse their first judgment. Consequently one exhibit carries off everything, what is vulgarly described "scoops the pool" and competitors feel it is unfair to them in the whole and most decidedly discouraging. If the rule is not made then it should be clearly understood that a prize taking picture in one section is thrown out at once from all the remaining classes.



Thursday 23rd February 1905  Page 14 - Punch (Melbourne, Vic.)

The annual exhibition of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was opened at the Victorian Artists Galleries, Albert-street, on Monday afternoon by His Excellency the Lieutenant-Governor, Sir John Madden. Sir John, in declaring the exhibition open, made one of his characteristically happy speeches, in which he pointed out the immense strides which, photography had taken since its comparatively recent birth. He drew attention to the aid that it had been to science in discovering "other worlds than ours" and he congratulated the association upon the splendid exhibition that they had produced. After formally declaring the exhibition open, Sir John was entertained by the committee at afternoon tea. The present exhibition is without doubt the best that the society has ever held, the range of subjects and of departments and methods being very large. We will not particularize in the way of mentioning individual pictures, because we must necessarily point out the merits of photographs which, for some good reason or other, failed to catch the judge's eye. It is an unpleasant duty that judges have to perform and we therefore throw no stone at them. They have done their duty conscientiously and well and those who, like ourselves, may differ some of their awards, respect their judgment and accept it as possibly superior to their own. But on the general excellence of the exhibition we can speak strongly. This excellence shows that the amateurs of Victoria have made immense strides, not merely in technique, but in artistic knowledge. There was a time and not so far back, when the amateur who took a photograph of "Granpa" was told "It's just the image of Grandpa - you could swear to the waistcoat". In this exhibition waistcoats are retired to their proper obscurity and poses and lighting are secured that bring out a characteristic likeness of the individual. The landscapes display the same thoughtfulness and study and the enlargements are far superior to any that we have had here before. The extent to which enlargement can be carried is shown by a view of a scene at Healsville from a small Kodak negative and in the beautiful enlargements of New Zealand scenery on Austral "Pearl" paper. These enlargements are really better than the original photographs, for, whilst they lose some what in sharpness and definition, they gain in atmospheric and pictorial effect. The loan collection from the Royal Photographic Society of England is well worth study, for the double reason of learning what it is necessary to adopt and what it is advisable to avoid. There is much in it that is admirable and artistic and much that, in more than a photographic sense, is "rotten". Dr Emmerson has a lot to answer for in teaching the young idea how to fuzz. The non-competitive exhibits of the professional photographers are interesting and instructive. All the large firms are well represented in a manner worthy of their high reputations, Johnstone, O'Shannessy and Co., Sears Studio, Swiss Studio, Burlington Studio and T. Humphrey and Co., have some splendid pictures.



Saturday 25th February 1905  Page 23 - Leader (Melbourne, Vic.)

The inter-State exhibition of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was formally opened at the Victorian Artists' Society's rooms, Albert-street, on Monday. The judging had been already completed and the prizes awarded. All the States of Australia are well represented, while Great Britain has sent no fewer than 120 exhibits, the work of 43 artists, many of them men of excellent reputation and South Africa has sent five. The judges: Messrs. J. Ford Patterson, F. M'Cubbin and A. Barrie, made their awards a few days ago. The Members Challenge Trophy, for the best picture in the section limited to members of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, fell to Exhibit No. 207, a portrait named "The Grandfather", the work of Mr. D.W. Patterson, of Melbourne and the gold medal for the best in the section open to members of kindred societies in Australasia was awarded to Mr. James D. Stening, of New South Wales, for a landscape (No. 251). Mr. J. Temple Stephens secured the gold medal in the section open to all photographers, with a landscape, "Sand Dunes" (No. 289). The British section of the exhibition is one of its most noteworthy features. The pictures are well selected and cover a wide range of subjects. Amongst the portraits of this division that named "The Waggoner" must attract particular attention. There is also a fine general display of technical and scientific photographs, autotypes, lantern slides, transparencies and a collection of portraits by leading professional photographers of Melbourne.



Wednesday 1st March 1905  Page 40 - Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW)

The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria's Exhibition at the Victoria Artists Society's Galleries, East Melbourne, has for the past week been attracting a steady attendance of those interested in photography. I paid a visit to it late one afternoon and was only sorry that I could not spare time to go through it thoroughly, for even to one who knows practically nothing of photography or its methods it proved most interesting and instructive. The collection is a very comprehensive one, embracing, as it does all the different styles of photography, portraits, landscapes, seascapes, interiors, flowers, animals and scientific and technical, such as X-ray skiogaphs and examples of the three-color process for producing colored prints from photographs. In the competitive sections alone there were 324 separate pictures and I must say my thought, on glancing round was sympathy for the judges. I should think the task of selecting the prize-winners from amongst so many, nearly all of which were of a high standard of excellence, must have been a real herculean piece of work. It was noticeable in their decisions that the judges (Mr. F. M'Cubbin, president of the Victorian Artists Society; Mr. J. Ford Paterson, trustee National Gallery, Melbourne and Mr. A. Barrie, for many years with Talma and Company) had leant towards the impressionist style of photography, thereby causing some sadness amongst those photographers who prefer the more clear-cut and sharply defined class of picture. It was difficult in such a hurried visit as mine to see all that was to be seen and no doubt I passed over many which I would have enjoyed looking at had I had more time. The prize pictures were easily distinguishable by the yellow tickets attached to them and of these the ones that I personally thought the most beautiful were, "The Edge of the Common" by James S. Stening - who by the way, is, I believe, president of the Photographic Society of New South Wales, Mr. Stening gained the gold medal in section 29 - "Teamsters, Yarra Track" by E.W. Cox. "Youth and Beauty" by W. Churchill Fisher, a charming picture of a group of beautiful cows in a paddock, which in grouping and atmospheric effect reminded me forcibly of Scheltema's cattle pictures. "The Park" by J. Williams and "Marshlands" by Miss Agnes Thomson. Of those which did not gain prizes, I particularly admired "Elwood" an essay in Japanese treatment, by E.C. Joshua; "Winter Mist" by J. Kauffmann; "The Sunlit Harbour" by Albert J. Perrier; "Sweet Peas" by T. Warner; "Daffodils" by T. Warner; "The Newsvendor" by A.R. Wheeler; "Sun Setting, Sydney Harbour" and "South-east Gale Bondi" by T. Cummins. The three pictures - "Water Baby", "Water Nymph" and "Youthful Reflections" - by Fritz Kricheldorff are an excellent example of Mr. Krieheldorff's unique method, of artistic combination photography. As you will no doubt have observed from the foregoing list, the exhibits were not confined to Victoria alone, but were contributed to by artists from other colonies. There was also a fine collection from England sent by the Royal Photographic Society of Great Britain and exhibits from the leading professional photographers in Melbourne. I specially liked an example of the Swiss Studios work in terra cotta tones, Sear's Studio bromide enlargements and Humphrey's portrait of Mr. Alberto Zelman. I also admired very much Baker and Rouse's exhibit of the Autotype Company's productions, some of which were very beautiful; also Baker and Rouse's bromide enlargements of New Zealand scenery and some enlargements of the Kodak Company on a scene, a Healesville (Victoria) by Percy Hume, being very beautiful. One of the most interesting of the various collection was that of the stereoscopic radiographs, negatives and prints (X-ray work), by A.G. Fryett (Dr. Fred Bird's lay assistant). Seen through the stereoscope the picture of the lungs and other parts of the body stood out in the most wonderful way. A great deal of time and trouble must, have been spent on getting up the exhibition and it is to be hoped it has been as great a success financially as it has been artistically.



Wednesday 8th March 1905  Page 582 - The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW)

The AUSTRALASIAN PHOTO REVIEW, of February 1905, gives valuable hints to amateurs and publishes some of the prize-winning pictures at the exhibition held under the auspices of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria. Regarding these it is noteworthy that the judges, J. Ford Patterson, Fred. M'Cubbin and A. Barrie, held that the collection as a whole marked a distinct advance in pictorial work by photography.



21st March 1905  Page 110 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
At the annual meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, the following officers were elected: President, Mr. H.C. Mais, M.Inst. C.E.; vice-presidents, Messrs. J.W. Eggleston and F.A. Kernot; hon. custodian, Mr. R. Ferguson; Hon. librarian, Mr. H.C. Ward ; Hon.Secretary and Hon. Treasurer, F.W. Miscamble, pro.tem.; auditors, E.H. Cooke, J.J. Killen; council (eight), Messrs. E.W. Cox, W.C. Cragie, C. Hardie, J.T.T. Harding, J.B. Hayles, J.H. Mulvany, H.J. Trowbridge, W. Warner. At the conclusion of the business, the motions affecting the alterations of rules of which notice was given on the 23rd September last and which were considered and adjourned on the 14th December last, were further considered and dealt with. In accordance with Rule No. 12, amended 14th December 1903, members who have not paid their subscriptions for the current year by the 28th February, have forfeited their membership.



Thursday 30th March 1905  Page 23 - Punch (Melbourne, Vic.)

A dinner was given to Mr. H.C. Mais, the president, at Lucas Cafe on Monday last at 8pm by the Council of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria as a fitting wind-up to the Photo Art Exhibition, held at the Victorian Artists rooms. Mr. Eggleston (vice-president) eulogized Mr. Mais untiring energy in exhibition matters and gave him the credit of being the means of bringing the same to a successful conclusion and as a mark of esteem presented him, on behalf of the members, with an autotype picture of Windsor Castle. Mr. Mais was quite surprised and made a feeling reply. Mr. Miscamble read the report and balance-sheet, which showed a slight debit — so slight that the exhibition was pronounced a financial as well as a decided artistic success. The toasts of "The King", Baker and Rouse Prop. Ltd., replied to by Mr. Rouse, "The Prize Winners", responded to by several, brought a very pleasant evening to a close about 11pm The retiring Hon.Secretary (Mr. F.W. Miscamble) was accorded a hearty vote of thanks and at the same time it was announced that Mr. D.W. Paterson had accepted the office of Hon.Secretary. We learn that several new members have joined this month. The society is making great headway and in time hope to have their own club rooms open to members. We wish the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria the success it undoubtedly deserves.






Saturday 30th September 1905  Page 43 - The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic.)

The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria will present the medals to successful exhibitors at the recent photographic exhibition at an evening entertainment in the tea-rooms, Equitable-buildings, on the evening of 4th October, at 8pm.



Thursday 5th October 1905  Page 4 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

A very pleasant social evening was spent at the tea rooms, Equitable Building, last night by the members of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, the occasion being the presentation of prizes to the successful exhibitors at the inter-State photographic exhibition in February last. Mr. H.C. Mais, the president of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, presided and made the presentations, which consisted of a handsome challenge shield and gold medal, presented by Mr. J. Temple Stephens and won by Mr. D.W. Paterson, for the best picture in the exhibition and a number of artistic bronze plaques and medals won by exhibitors in Victoria and New South Wales. Songs were sung during the evening by Misses Hettie Eggleston and Lottie Wemyss, Messrs. G.H. Sutton, Eggleston, Hayles and D.W. Paterson.



Wednesday 11th April 1906  Page 6 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The monthly meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria will be held this evening at The Strand, Collins-street. Mr. D.W. Paterson will illustrate The Carbon Process.



23rd April 1906  Page 149 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
A very interesting and instructive meeting was held at the Strand, Collins Street, Melbourne, on Wednesday 14th March, when Mr. Robert Harvie gave some useful and practical “Hints on Improving Negatives and Prints”. The lecturer advised members to endeavor to get round and not over difficulties. For intensification, Mr. Harvie strongly recommended the following formula: Red iodide of mercury, 15 grains; water, 2 ozs., with enough iodide of potassium to dissolve the precipitate formed (say 1 drachm). Using this formula the risk of spoiling the negative is nil. One point emphasized was that absolute fixation is essential before intensification. If the iodide is used much in excess of quantity given in formula, reticulation of the film is almost sure to result. After the film has been soaked in water for a few minutes the intensifier is applied with a brush or cotton wool and gains density while applying. When fully intensified the negative should be rinsed in a weak solution of hypo. If the film is at all greasy, methylated spirits, plus 1-10th ammonia, will remove same at once. This (methylated spirits and ammonia) is also the best thing for removing those lines which always seem to make their appearance on glossy bromide and gaslight papers and dries almost immediately. Reduction: (1) Permanganate of potassium, 20 grains; sulphuric acid, 6 drops; water, 2 ozs.; or, (2) 5 per cent, solution cyanide of potassium, say 2 ozs.; iodine, 20 grains; iodide of potassium, 80 grains; water, 4 ozs.; 1 drachm. It sometimes occurs that some object needs removing from our bromide prints. No. 2 formula will obliterate the objectionable part very quickly and effectively and is best applied with a brush. If after treatment any stains appear, they may be removed by oxalic acid. This (No. 2) formula attacks the shadows in negatives more than the high lights. Stripping Negatives. Soak in a 5 per cent, solution of formalin for 10 minutes, blot off surplus moisture, add a couple of drops of fluoric acid to a pint of water, soak the film in this and it will very soon separate from the glass. Mounting prints on thin paper and Nature Mount. Prepare ordinary glue, with a little sugar added and apply to back of prints while wet; allow print to dry and simply moisten with damp sponge, and mount in usual way. On the strong recommendation of the Council the members unanimously elected Mr. Robert Harvie an honorary member of the Association, in recognition of his many and valued services (as the President put it), past, present and to come to which Mr. Harvie suitably responded. The President also had the pleasure of welcoming Mr. Manning, Hon.Secretary of the Photographic Society of New South Wales, who was present.



Thursday 17th May 1906  Page 3 - Punch (Melbourne, Vic.)

An interesting meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was held at the "Strand", Collins-street, last week, when Mr. H.J. Trowbridge gave a demonstration illustrative of the making of lantern slides. Mr. Trowbridge used "Reliable" plates, a local manufacture and exposed them to the same light at different distances. The results were practically the same owing to the development. The lecturer then showed how lantern slides might be modified and altered in color by intensification and reduction. The various methods of toning were also shown. The same slide under different treatments was shown upon the screen. A hearty vote of thanks was accorded to the lecturer at the close of the entertainment.



21st May 1906  Page 189 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
A very interesting and instructive meeting was held on the 9th May at their rooms, 356 Collins Street, Melbourne, when Mr. H.J. Trowbridge gave a demonstration on lantern slide making and explained that this was a very simple matter, there being three methods of making slides: 1, By contact; 2, by reduction; and 3 by proxy.

The first was the method demonstrated the exposures being with half an inch of magnesium ribbon at varying distances. The developer recommended was hydrokinone, the slide to be developed further than as a negative as they lose density somewhat in fixing, the lecturer advising the use of an acid fixing bath for slides and to be well rinsed between developing and fixing and thorough washing after fixing. In printing the lecturer used red plush at back of slide, recommending this as equal to a backed plate. In binding the slides the spots are best on the inside of cover-glass, where they are always clean and secure.

After the lecturer had made several slides, intensified and toned others, according to various formulae, a number of slides were projected on the screen, illustrating the results of the different toning agents. The slides were mostly Tasmanian and Victorian scenery, some sunset effects toned by the copper bath being very fine. The following are the various formula recommended:

First bleach slide in a saturated solution of bichloride of mercury and then for black tone immerse in a 5 per cent, solution of potassium metabisulphite warm.
Warm Black: 10 per cent, solution of sulphite of soda.
Brown: 20 per cent, solution of hypo.
Reddish Brown: Immerse in a 10 per cent, solution of washing soda.
Copper Tone: B. and W. tabloids; and for Bartolozzi Red, bleach in pot. bichromate 20 grains, acid hydrochloric 2 drachms, water 10 ozs. Wash until free from all yellow stain, and place in bath of Schlippes salt 15 grains, to 1 oz. water. The latter intensifies, therefore print light.




21st May 1906  Page 190 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
The April meeting was held on the 11th May, at the Strand, Collins Street, Melbourne and the members were pleased to welcome Mr. A.E. Hill, assistant-secretary of the Northern Tasmanian Camera Club.

The special business of the evening was a demonstration of the working of the carbon process by Mr. D.W. Paterson.

The lecturer explained why and how this was the simplest and most satisfactory process to work, the tones required being, obtained with absolute certainty and what is more important still, you know beforehand what the final tone will be and suit your subject accordingly.

The bath for sensitizing the tissue as recommended was 2 1/2 ozs. of bichromate of potash in 80 ozs. of water, to be used at a temperature not exceeding 65 degrees. If hotter than this reticulation of the film on tissue is almost sure to occur. When the tissue is immersed in this bath it will, after first curling, straighten out again. It is then squeegeed on to a clean piece of glass face down and the surplus moisture removed; then stripped off the glass and laid face up on a piece of bent cardboard, with a piece of blotting paper under the tissue to facilitate drying. When thoroughly dry it should be kept in the dark under pressure and will remain good for a fortnight. The longer it is kept the more sensitive it becomes.

When printing a safe edge is necessary, otherwise the pigmented film will leave its support on development. The simplest form of actinometer is a piece of P.O.P. under a negative of similar density to that used for the carbon and when all detail is out in the P.O.P. print the carbon will be fully printed.

The tissue after printing is immersed in hot water 90 to 100 degrees and brought into contact (under water) with the temporary or final support and afterwards developed in water about 80 degrees.

The foregoing bath was recommended for ordinary negatives, weak ones requiring about 2 ozs. bichromate of potash and for contrasty negatives the following was strongly recommended: 3 ozs. bichromate of potash to 80 ozs. water, add 1/2 oz. citric acid and enough ammonia to turn the solution a pale yellow.

The more ammonia present the more tender the tissue becomes. The lecturer strongly recommended carbon for transparencies, both for the lantern and also as a means of duplicating one’s pet negatives, in case the original gets broken or otherwise injured.




Monday 18th June 1906  Page 5 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

At the society's rooms, The Strand, 350 Collins-street, on Saturday afternoon and evening, the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria held its annual exhibition of Pictures and lantern slides. The pictures this year, although small in number, show a decided improvement on those exhibited on former occasions and the judges, Messrs. Withers, Mather and Van Heims, had considerable difficulty, in several instances in choosing between prints of apparently equal merit. They awarded the first prize to Mr. D.W. Paterson's picture Half Moon Bay, which entitles the winner to retain for another year the annual challenge shield presented by the president of the society, Mr. J. Temple Stephens, for competition amongst the members. Mr. Paterson was also successful in securing the shield last year with his beautiful red carbon print Grandpa. Half Moon Bay, this year's prize picture, is a fine brown bromide, of which the finest feature is the atmosphere. It is a seascape introducing a sunset effect, which is remarkable in a photograph. The mellow, natural lighting of the print, combined with its fine sympathy of tone and color, make up the essential elements of a picture which is well worthy of attention. The fine effects of light and shadow introduced by Miss Agnes Thomson into her picture Evening Shadows resulted in its being placed second in order of merit to that of Mr. Paterson. This picture is also a seascape printed on self-toning paper. One of the most remarkable pictures in the exhibition was a "pinhole" production of Princes bridge. The atmosphere appears natural and pleasing in every respect and looking at it for the first time, the picture strikes one as being an engraving by one of the old etchers. A new idea, introduced by Mr. J.B. Hayles, was seen for the first time in a couple of "wet weather" pictures depicting incidents in the city on a rainy day. A Dusty Bit, another picture by the same photographer, successfully introduced an effect which is generally shunned by amateurs in the form of a cloud of dust in a park avenue. If Mr. Wal. Briglet had not printed his picture Wandiligong so darkly its pictorial value would have been greatly enhanced; as it is, however, the cloud effect is very fine. The following pictures are also worthy of mention: Mountain Falls, Warburton, We Two and Marjorie, by Mr. W. Warner; The Edge of the Field and Dead Game, by Mr. R. Ferguson; Traveling Cattle, The Old Homestead, On the Yarra and Happy Days, by Mr. J.B. Hayles.

A successful exhibition of lantern slides was held in the evening. The successful competitors in this section were Messrs. J.B. Hayles and A. Larard, who secured the first and second prizes respectively. An appreciable advance on former displays was always, noticeable in this portion of the exhibition. The conditions provided for the six best slides and although several sets included slides of very high merit, the all round excellence of Mr. Hayles's set, A Wet Day in Melbourne, was not to be denied.




Wednesday 11th July 1906  Page 6 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria meets to-night, at The Strand, 356 Collins-street, at 8pm, when Messrs. Craigie and Hardie will give a joint lecture, illustrated, by lantern slides, on Camping Out With the Camera.



21st July 1906  Page 275 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
On the 16th June the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria held the 23rd anniversary at The Strand, Collins Street, Melbourne. In the afternoon there was an exhibition of the pictures in competition for the Temple Stephens Challenge Shield, the entries numbering 31, and the association is to be complimented upon the high standard obtained. It is whispered that the judges had some difficulty in awarding the prize, which again fell to Mr. D.W. Paterson, who thus holds the shield for the second year running. In the evening the members and their friends met again, when the lantern slides, 96 in number, in competition for the president’s trophies, were thrown on the screen and were much appreciated. The first award was made to Mr. J.B. Hayles for his “Six Wet Days in Melbourne”, which were very fine and the second place was secured by Mr. A. Darard for six landscapes.

Most of the competitive slides, including the two prize sets, have been generously donated to the association, which the council hope is the beginning of a good collection.

Mr. John Patterson, who has brought three-color photography to such a high level, kindly lent his slides in natural colors, which brought forth much applause.

During the evening musical items were rendered by several members and friends, followed by some beautiful slides of English scenery, made by the collodion process, all taken some 30 years ago by Mr. E.W. Burton, one of the members, some views of the hoar frost being specially fine.

At the conclusion all adjourned and partook of an excellent supper and it is hoped it will not be long before a similar gathering takes place.




21st July 1906  Page 278 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoriaheld their July meeting on the 11th July, at The Strand. Collins Street, Melbourne, where Messrs. Craigie and Hardie, members of the Association, gave a joint lecture, which was illustrated by a fine set of lantern slides of a rather novel trip they and another party took recently.

A van and three horses was first engaged for a fortnight. Everything was packed in the van over night and a start was made early next morning. A day’s program was carried out somewhat on the following lines: The first thing in the morning the fire was lit and breakfast cooked and by the time the billy was boiling the ladies usually appeared from the wagon, which was used by them as a bedroom. Breakfast followed, after which the things were packed into the wagon, the tent struck, which, by the way, was the gentlemen's quarters, the horses attended to and then off on the road. The first halt was made for dinner and whenever an opportunity presented itself pictures were secured; or, if the larder was low, guns and fishing-rods were brought into requisition. About 5pm camp was pitched and tea made. After tea they all gathered round the fire and a general swapping of stories was carried on. At 9pm the ladies retired. Plates were then changed, and records noted for future reference when developing. Everything was then made snug for the night.

Some 150 slides were shown on the screen, the majority of which were developed with Adurol. They illustrated the trip very fully from the beginning to the end. Some of the finest bits of scenery and views in and around Headsville, the Black Spur, Marysville, were included.

This way of spending one’s annual holiday ranks among the best. You are constantly in the open-air and in touch with Nature. There are plenty of opportunities for using the camera and it is only when on such a trip as this, away from the beaten track, that the value of the camera is appreciated it enables one, by the aid of the lantern, to visit these scenes afresh and give pleasure to both you and your friends. This month the Association commences its Instruction Evenings, the subject tor the 25th being “Toning Lantern Slides”.




Wednesday 8th August 1906  Page 6 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria meets to-night in the lecture hall at the Working Men's College, Bowen-street, when Mr. Jas. Aebi will give a demonstration entitled Collodio-Bromide and Chloride Emulsion Making.



Wednesday 12th September 1906  Page 6 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria meets at The Strand, Collins-street, to-night, at 8pm, when Mr. A.J. Campbell will give an illustrated lecture on Australian Birds.



21st September 1906  Page 357 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
A very interesting evening was spent at the rooms on the 12th September, when Mr. A.J. Campbell gave an illustrated lecture on “Australian Birds”, showing the birds and their nests. Many of the photographs were taken under trying circumstances, such as fording a river up to the armpits in one case and in another wading through a swamp and having found the nest sought for, a raft had to be constructed on which to place the camera. The views shown on the screen were very fine. Mr. Campbell is a member of the Ornithological Society and requiring to illustrate a book, he turned his attention to photography, with the result that the camera is now an indispensable companion on all his travels.
At the conclusion of the meeting the President (Mr. H.C. Mais) presented the two plaques given by himself as prizes in the June competition for the best set of six lantern slides, the first prize being awarded to Mr. J.B. Hayles and the second to Mr. A. Larard.




Saturday 25th May 1907  Page 12 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

A fine display of amateur photographic work was on view at the St. John's Hall, Caulfield, last evening, when the East Malvern Amateur Photographic Club held its first exhibition. The exhibition was opened by the vice-president, Dr. H.L. Murray, in the presence of about 100 camera enthusiasts. The photographs were well grouped and arranged, the hall being lit with acetylene gas to facilitate inspection. About 200 framed exhibits were hung on the walls and on screens and there were, in addition, 300 ordinary photographic prints. The exhibition was of interest in showing recent advances in photography, but the main interest was in the inter-club competition arranged by the East Malvern club. The local club secured the trophy, a bronze plaque, the judges, Messrs. Bernard Hall and C.E. Harvie, placing the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria second and the Working Men's College Camera Club third. The other competitors were the Ballarat, Gordon College (Geelong) and Clifton Hill camera clubs. The prints for the East Malvern exhibit were chosen from the work of members by Mr. R. Porteus and were the work of Messrs. E.C. Joshua, W.C. Taylor, A.E. Alcott, A. Wills, J.P. Campbell and Sidney Fox (Hon.Secretary). The judges drew attention to the outstanding merits of two pictures. Half Moon Bay, Sandringham, by E.W. Patterson and Just Out, by A.A. Bishop. A number of interesting stereoscopic and X ray side shows attracted attention. To-day a conference of delegates from photographic clubs will be held in connection with the exhibition, the aim being that a union of amateur photographers of the State should be formed.



20th June 1907  Page 144 - The Australian Photographic Journal

The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria has now moved into its finely appointed rooms in 59 Swanston-street, Melbourne. In addition to the large room for general meetings, there is a committee and reading room, with a large dark room attached, for the use of members, open daily from 10am to 10pm; every convenience for developing, enlarging, etc. The Hon.Secretary, Mr. D.W. Paterson, extends a hearty welcome to members of kindred associations in other States, when in Melbourne, in the use at all times of the club's rooms.



21st June 1907  Page 232 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria has shifted its headquarters to rooms at 59 Swanston Street, Melbourne, and writes the Review to the effect that in addition to a large room for general meetings they have also a committee and reading room for the use of members which is open daily from 10am to 10pm. There is also a commodious darkroom and every convenience required. The Hon.Secretary concludes his letter with the following genial invitation: “Members of kindred societies in other States are at all times welcome to the use of our rooms, when they happen to be in Melbourne”.



Tuesday 16th July 1907  Page 6 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

A fine display of amateur photographic work was on view at the St. John's Hall, Caulfield, last evening, when the East Malvern Amateur Photographic Club held its first exhibition. The exhibition was opened by the vice-president. Dr. H.L. Murray, in the presence of about 100 camera enthusiasts. The photographs were well grouped and arranged, the hall being lit with acetylene gas to facilitate inspection. About 200 framed exhibits were hung on the walls and on screens and there were, in addition, 300 ordinary photographic prints. The exhibition was of interest in showing recent advances in photography, but the main interest was in the inter-club competition arranged by the East Malvern Amateur Photographic Club. The local club secured the trophy, a bronze plaque, the judges, Messrs. Bernard Hall and C.E. Harvie, placing the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria second and the Working Men's College Camera Club third. The other competitors were the Ballarat, Gordon College (Geelong) and Clifton Hill camera clubs. The prints for the East Malvern exhibit were chosen from the work of members by Mr. R. Porteus and were the work of Messrs. E.C. Joshua, W.C. Taylor, A.E. Alcott, A. Wills, J.P. Campbell and Sidney Fox (hon Hon.Secretary). The judges drew attention to the outstanding merits of two pictures. Half Moon Bay, Sandringham, by E.W. Patterson and Just Out, by A.A. Bishop. A number of interesting stereoscopic and X ray side shows attracted attention. To-day a conference of delegates from photographic clubs will be held in connection with the exhibition, the aim being that a union of amateur photographers of the State should be formed.



Tuesday 16th July 1907  Page 6 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Wednesday 17th July 1907  Page 6 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

PHOTOGRAPHIC CONFERENCE
A conference of Victorian amateur photographic clubs will be held to-morrow, at 8pm, at the rooms of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, 59 Swanston Street. At a previous conference held on May 25, the desirability of forming a Controlling body in connection with amateur photography was affirmed and it is proposed to constitute such a body at the conference on Wednesday next and draw up the necessary rules and regulations. The following Clubs have notified their intention of being represented by delegates, viz. Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, Working Men's College Photographic Club, East Malvern Amateur Photographic Club, Gordon College Amateur Photographic Association, Geelong, Ballarat Camera Club, Clifton Hill Amateur Photographic Club and Footscray Camera Club.



Tuesday 16th July 1907  Page 6 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

The Clifton Hill Amateur Photographic Club exhibition at the Athenaeum Hall, which closes to-night, still continues to attract attention. There was another large attendance on Saturday evening. The principal prize winners were J. Temple Stephens and O.W. Coulson, in landscape; C. Davis and A.J. Campbell, in seascape; O.W. Coulson and D.W. Paterson, in portraiture; A.J. Campbell and Sydney Fox, in the enlargement section. The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was successful in obtaining first for the inter-club competition, with the Working Men's College Photographic Club second. F. Button secured Messrs. Wellington and Ward's special prize for a print from a negative taken on one of their plates.



Tuesday 20th July 1907  Page 167 - The Australian Photographic Journal
Thursday 22nd July 1907  Page 276 - The The Australasian Photographic Review

An eminently successful social was held by the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, in the new Club-rooms, Nos. 57-59 Swanston-street, Melbourne, on the evening of Wednesday 10th June 1907, to commemorate the 24th anniversary of the foundation of the Society and to celebrate the opening of the new suite of rooms, into the occupation of which the Association had just entered.

The new club-rooms are situated in the most central block of the city, in the immediate vicinity of the town hall, the cathedral and the central suburban railway station. Besides the commodious club and reading room, furnished with current periodical photographic journals and general literature, there is a spacious lecture hall and a well-appointed dark-room equipped with all necessary facilities for the development of negatives and the making of enlargements by solar or electric illumination. The commodiousness of the new quarters of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria was the subject of very cordial and general commendation by all present and it was generally agreed that they would provide for an existing need a place of rendezvous for those interested in the promotion of artistic photography; not only the residents of the metropolis, but also of visitors from the country centers, from the other States of the Commonwealth and from overseas. It may be mentioned that the rooms are opened every day from 10am to 10pm. In recognition of the approval of the efforts of the council in the work done in the matter of improvement in the accommodation, a vote of thanks was accorded to all concerned, on the motion of Messrs. F.W. Miscamble and H.C. Mais. Advantage was taken of the meeting to exhibit the work sent in for the annual competition for the challenge shield presented by Mr. J. Temple Stephens and to announce the award of the judges, Messrs. L. Bernard Hall, Walter Withers and Robert W. Harvie. The twenty­four exhibits were of a high standard of artistic merit and the competition an exceedingly close one. Unanimity was, however, arrived at in the award which was in favor of the exhibit of Mr. E.C. Joshua - a small drove of horses on a dusty road. The picture showed much taste in composition and suggested considerable freedom and action, whilst the pervading atmosphere was especially fine; the picture was generally admired. The runner up was Mr. D.W. Paterson, the popular Hon.Secretary of the Association and winner in the last two competitions. After viewing the exhibits, the large company adjourned to the lecture hall where an excellent program of songs and recitations were admirably rendered by Ella McLelland and Lottie Wemyas and Messrs. F. Duggan, Ballantyne and T.H. Watson. A particularly interesting series of views of native scenery was projected upon the screen. Some excellent slides of subjects in natural color (the Sangar-Sheppard process), including some landscapes of fern gullies, the work of Mr. John Patterson; one of our most successful workers in this department of artistic photography, was greatly admired. During the evening, the Hon.Secretary, Mr. D.W. Paterson, in congratulating the Society upon the position it had attained after years of difficulty and trial, called attention to the work done by the founders of the Association in the past and the satisfaction which it was to know that of the pioneers not a few were still members of the Association after the lapse of nearly a quarter of a century. There was still in active co-operation the president (Mr. F.A. Kernott) and Messrs. Edgar Bell, James Pettigrew, Furton, James Musgrove and Ward and whilst the Association was rejoicing in the great advance which had been accomplished, it could not overlook the work done by these earnest workers in preparing the way for these greater things. Nor must members rest satisfied with the position already attained but should allow what had been attained to be an incentive to go on and by constant increase of membership, develop the power and extend the usefulness of the Association. To every member he desired to say "Do your little to help the Association along the road of prosperity and those who have the interests of amateur photography at heart will be ever­lastingly grateful to you". The challenge shield having been handed to Mr. Joshua as holder for the present year, a vote of thanks was accorded to the performers, to the hon. judges of the competition and to Mr. J. Patterson for the loan of his beautiful slides. After partaking of light refreshments the company separated and one of the most successful and enjoyable re-unions which has been held under the auspices of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria for many years was brought to a close.

J.T.T. HARDING
Press Correspondent, Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria




20th September 1907  Page 217 - The Australian Photographic Journal
21st September 1907  Page 355 - The Australasian Photographic Review

The entering into occupation of the new club rooms has marked a new era in the history of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, which promises to be an era not of increased membership merely but of increased interest and activity in all branches of the society's operations. The fine accommodation provided has been not only the subject of general eulogy upon the part of members and visitors, but bas been very largely availed of for the purposes for which it has been provided, the dark-room and enlarging apparatus being in constant use, by day and evenings.

The various meetings held since last report have been well attended and the advantages afforded by the instructional evenings and social conversational evenings have been more generally appreciated than in the past. The membership roll bas shown an appreciable weekly increase, now numbering 75 active members, including many ladies.

On the evening of the 14th instant the monthly general meeting was held, when the large lecture hall was filled by a large audience of members and their friends, present by invitation. The lecturer for the evening, Mr. Larard, entertained the company with an interesting reminiscence of a trip to Europe, to Norway, "The land of the mid-night sun". The lecture was illustrated by the optical lantern, the views shown being mostly from slides from negatives taken by the lecturer. The lecturer took his company into his confidence at the outset by saying that it was to a disposition for "taking on easy things" that was responsible for his appearance as a lecturer that evening. When projecting his trip, someone recommended him to take a camera, assuring him that "photography was an easy thing" and his natural disposition to undertake "easy things" did the rest. Armed with a camera and fortified with three weeks of practical experience in operative photography, he started upon his tour. His narrative of his journey via Colombo, the Red Sea, Suez Canal, Gibraltar, Portsmouth, London, the Isle of Wight and through some of the beauty spots and places of Old England was interesting and of his later experiences in Paris entertaining. The trip north was told with a perfect naturalness that captivated his hearers. The illustrations, but for the lecturer's previous admissions, would not have been looked upon as the work of a novice, as some of the slides were well up to the standard of professional excellence.

From Colombo to the lecturer's furthest north the trip was profusely illustrated, the series closing, appropriately enough, with the photograph of a little lady attired in the Norwegian national costume, taken shortly after the hour of midnight by the light of the then low-down midnight sun.

On the motion of the President, Mr. F.A. Kernot, a hearty vote of thanks was accorded by acclamation to the lecturer at the close of the entertainment.




20th December 1907  Page 299 - The Australian Photographic Journal
14th December 1907  Page 477 and 478 - The Australasian Photographic Review

Since last report the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria as kept well abreast of its opportunities and has been profitably active in all departments of its work. The interest and increased activity, attendant upon its advantageous change of location has been fully maintained and the out­look is more than encouraging. General meetings of the Association, Instruction evenings, Social talks and Outings with the camera, have followed each other in rapid succession, with frequently less than a week's interval between these engagements. The club room has, in the meantime, been daily and nightly freely availed of for social talks and interchange of ideas.

Demonstrations on "The Camera-usage and Photographic manipulation", by so able an exponent as Mr. Robert Harvie, was followed by a "Print trimming competition" where the judging was in the capable hands of our enthusiastic friend and mentor, Mr. J. Temple Stephens. In this competition about a score of the members essayed to indicate their ideas of proper treatment of a collection of untrimmed prints, supplied by members for the purpose, prior to mounting. By means of strips of paper the competitors masked off the portions of the prints which in their judgment should be trimmed off so that the mounted picture should be seen to the greatest artistic advantage. The evening proved a most instructive one, bringing into prominence the great diversity of opinion prevailing upon the subject and, to competitors and onlookers alike, the matured criticism of the judge was of great educative advantage. The winners of the competition turned up in (1) Mr. Allen, one of the younger members of the Association, (2) Mr. J.B. Hayles, a name familiar in prize lists and lastly though not least, (3) Mr. R. Ferguson, one of our veterans. In view of the great success of the competition and the educative possibilities of the study, in the cultivation and development of an artistic taste in selection, future competitions of this class will find a place. from time to time in the syllabus for the session of the incoming year.

The instruction evenings have been devoted to practical demonstrations, of "Positive and enlarged negative making", on the 18th September, "Paper negative making", by Mr. J. Temple Stephens, on the 16th October and a "Talk on Stereoscope work", by Mr. J.B. Hayles, on the 20th instant and have all been what they professed to be, instructive, eminently helpful to the beginner and not without their advantage to those whose attainments were far beyond that of the tyro. The lecture for the month, entitled "A run through New Zealand", was delivered by Mr. Haughton Watson, on the 13th instant, to a large audience of members and their friends.

In the absence of the President the chair was occupied by Mr. J.W. Egglestone and for about an hour and a half, the lecturer feasted the eyes of an enthusiastic company with a succession of particularly fine views of the beauty spots of "God's own country" and of some "spots as near the Inferno as any on the world of ours". From the extreme north, by easy stages, through the volcanic region with its characteristic blending of the awful and beautiful, down through the lake, river, mountain, glacier and sounds districts, the run progressed. The "running" commentary of the lecturer was racy and humorous and at all times keenly appreciative of the matter in hand, whether a boiling lake or an ice-clad peak amidst the "eternal snows".

The projection of the views at these lectures upon a specially prepared "flatted" solid wall surface, has enabled the lanternist, Mr. Ferguson, to obtain such accurate and sharp focusing as has brought out the finest details of the slides to perfection, to an extent that has here-to-fore been impossible where semi-transparent and moving screens have been employed. The immense improvement in this direction was generally recognized and was very favorably commented upon. A very cordial vote of thanks to the lecturer for his instructive and entertaining deliverance brought the meeting to a close.

In addition to progress in its internal affairs, the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria has in recent competitions, in things photographic, for itself and through its members, had the distinction to more than hold its own. In the Clifton Hill Amateur Photographic Club's exhibition, just closed, the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria had the honor of carrying off the first prize in the Inter-Club Competition with a very generally commended collection of the works of its representative members. In addition, exhibits by members of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria secured-two first prizes - Landscapes, Mr. J. Temple Stephens and post cards, Mr. J.B. Hayles and two second prizes, portraits, Mr. D.M. Patterson and interiors, Mr. E.C. Joshua.

In the competition held in connection with the Great Exhibition of Women's Work, now run at our Exhibition Building, one of our active lady members, Miss Agnes Thomson, has achieved a distinction upon which the Council of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria has felt it fitting to specially compliment her. The place which Miss Thomson has attained in the prize list and the manner in which her work has been singled out for special commendation in the press criticisms, have fully entitled her to this unique honor.

Under the present circumstances, the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria has the disposition to look back on the past month with very much of satisfied complacency, with, behind that sense of satisfaction, a firm determination that the closing meeting of the year, to be held on the 18th of next month, a Social evening, of members and friends, devoted to Song and Sentiment, shall be a worthy climax to what has been a very, eventful, active and prosperous year.




21st January 1908  Page 34 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
The last meeting of the year 1907 proved, as was anticipated, a fitting conclusion to a very prosperous and progressive year. A large company of members of the society and their friends assembled at the club rooms, on Wednesday 18th December, to spend a social evening together, in the enjoyment of song and sentiment, melody and mirth, and a prospective peep at the coming glory of photography, when arrayed in the perfection of natural color.

In the regrettable absence of the president, through indisposition, and the excusable absence of the vice-president, W.C. Cragie, who was assisting at a development-matrimonial, the chair was occupied by Mr. J.T.T. Harding.

The program proved a liberal one, comprising vocal numbers, all excellently rendered by Miss Wemyss, and Messrs. Ballantyne, D.W. Patterson, and Victor Harrison, whose humorous contributions were in refreshing contrast to much of the comic vocalization with which long-suffering audiences are all too often "favored". The encores, enthusiastically demanded, were at once a compliment to the talent of the vocalist and to the discerning taste of the audience.

A comic Scotch reading — "The Drawing o’ Tam Thompson’s Tooth", by Mr. Charles Hardy, a piano solo by Mr. H. Glover, and a pianola solo by Mr. H. Watson, lent variety to the program.

During the evening a selection of the prize lantern slides were shown, sets by Messrs. J.B. Hayles, W.C. Cragie, and Larard. The pictures, as their position on the prize lists would indicate, were of a generally high standard of excellency, and were greatly admired by an appreciative, if critical audience.

A feature of the evening was a lecture by Mr. John Patterson, one of the foremost exponents in the work of photography in natural colors, on his "darling hobby". His thoroughly practical and informative address was illustrated by an exhibition of slides prepared by the Sanger-Shepherd system, and in evidence of the advance made in the photography of natural color during the year, some single exposure slides, on the tri-colored starch-grain plate, "Lumiere" system, were shown. These slides, which were the first production of the artist, fairly carried away the audience, in enthusiastic raptures, at the vista opened up to the imagination in the possibilities of the process still hidden in the future.

A cordial vote of thanks was accorded to Mr. Patterson for his services to the society and to the cause of photography generally, in the energy and devotedness manifested by him in the advancement of the practice of color photography in Victoria, on the vote of Mr. J.W. Eggleston. Thanks were also accorded to the performers and to the chairman on the vote of Mr. F.W. Miscamble.

J.T.T. Harding
Press Correspondent
Melbourne. December 28th 1907.




21st March 1908  Page 115 and 116 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
On the 11th March, the annual meeting of the Association was held, when there was a large and representative attendance of members to deal with the general business and appoint office-bearers for the current year. Reports and balance sheet were eminently satisfactory, and will, as soon as the latter are audited, be made public property.

In the absence of the president, through indisposition, Mr. J. Temple Stephens presided, and conducted the election, which resulted as follows: President, Mr. D.W. Paterson; vice-presidents, Messrs. W. Churchill Fisher and J. Temple Stephens; Hon.Secretary, Mr. Haughton Watson; treasurer, Mr. J.B. Hayles; librarian, Mr. C. Hardie; custodian of apparatus, Mr. R. Ferguson; council, Messrs. F.E. Allen, W.C. Craigie, J.T.T. Harding, Dr. Holland, E.C. Joshua, J.H. Mulvany, A.J. Relph, and H.J. Trowbridge; auditors, Messrs. Killen and Cooke.

The syllabus arranged for the quarter includes two demonstrations, on “Oil Pigment Printing”, by Mr. J. Temple Stephens, and “Carbograph”, by the president, Mr. D.W. Paterson.

Three Practical Nights: “Printing Postcard Borders, etc.”, “Negative Development” and “Toning Bromides”. Three Camera Outings" To Williamstown, up the Salt-water River to “The Heights” and up the Yarra by motor launch. Three appointments for social chats on Art Development, etc.

The club competitions for the year are announced as follows:

Mr. Mulvany’s Prize: Open to new members of years 1907 and 1908, who have never won a prize for photography.

Conditions: That £1 per year for the next five years be allocated for a trophy to be competed for by new members of the year; not less than six members to compete or prize withheld. The competition to be decided in December of each year. No winner of a prize for photography to be eligible for this competition.

Subject: Pictorial, any size, any process. Winning picture to become the property of the Association. Three members of council to act as judges.

Outing Prizes: Presented by Mr. W.C. Craigie. (Open to all members).

Conditions: That two half-guinea prizes be competed for quarterly by members attending the Monthly Outings of the Association, viz, one half-guinea for the best three pictures made (one at each outing), and one half-guinea for the best single picture made at either of the three outings. (No competition unless at least three entries for each event.) To be decided quarterly, and judged by three members of the council.

Outings: 1st quarter, March, April, May: 2nd quarter, June, July, August; 3rd quarter, September, October, November on the last Saturday of each month.

Challenge Shield: Presented by Mr. J. Temple Stephens.

Conditions: It shall be competed for annually for five years, and after that time to become the property of the Association. The Association awards a medal to the winner of each year.

That the Winning picture (which must, in the judges opinion, be the best picture of the year) shall become the property of the Association absolutely. The picture may be of any subject, of any size, in any purely photographic process. In the event of the judges withholding the award on the ground that the work shown does not reach the standard required, the shield shall be retained by the winner of the previous year, but the medal to be withheld. That the Hon.Secretary shall receive two (2) guarantees for the amount of £5 before the shield is allowed to pass out of the Association’s hands. As far as judging is concerned, the prints shall be judged by two artists and one photographer. The shield or trophy has adequate provision made for the inscription of names of the champions for each year. This trophy is open only to those who are financial members of the Association.

John T.T. Harding
Press Correspondent.




21st May 1908  Page 196 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
Since last report, despite the intervention of the Easter holidays, the Society has enjoyed a season of profitable activity. Two photographic outings, to Williamstown for practice on marine subjects and to Maribyrnong, on the Salt water River, where some excellent studies were obtained, were held.

Two practical nights were profitably spent in studying “Printing Post-card Borders” under the guidance of Mr. J.B. Hayles and Negative Development, as an open subject, in which there was a considerable exchange of ideas, wherein the experienced amongst our number were of real practical assistance to the less expert, in the correction of mistakes and the general extension of a sound appreciation of the requirements of this very fundamental process in the work of picture making.

On the 8th of April, the Association met to witness a demonstration of Oil Pigment Printing, conducted with convincing success by Mr. J. Temple Stephens. The demonstrator carried a large and deeply interested company with him through an hour and a half with unwavering interest. Through the mysteries of the consistency of the pigment and the practical difficulties in “dabbing”, “hopping” and “stroking” he lured his willing hearers and watchers, who, whilst they wondered and admired the picture which grew into being under their gaze, hardly knew whether more to admire the work produced, or the masterly dexterity of the demonstrator. As a practical result of this demonstration, quite a number of the members have taken up the practice of this process on the information they have received and like little Oliver of immortal memory, are asking for “more”.

Under existing circumstances, the writer forecasts that the champion picture of the current year for the Temple Stephens Shield will be produced by this process.

J.T.T. Harding
Press Correspondent
Melbourne. 1st May 1908.




21st August 1908  Page 307 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
The Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria held a very successful and largely-attended meeting at the club rooms, Melbourne, on the evening of the 8th July 1908, to celebrate the 26th anniversary of its existence.

The chair was occupied by the President, Mr. D.W. Paterson, who reviewed the history of the Association from its foundation to the present, with references to the trials and triumphs of the pioneers, to whose energy and perseverance the present position was primarily due.

He congratulated members on the fact that the Society had never been so strong numerically as at present and referred hopefully to progress made in all departments of work. During the evening the walls of the library were adorned by the competition pictures, sent in under the J. Temple Stephens Challenge Shield conditions, as also the prints competing for the Vice-President’s (W.C. Craigie’s) prizes for best single and best trio of pictures taken at the monthly outing.

The judges were Messrs, J.F. Patterson, L. Wilkie and Porteous and the popular President, D.W. Paterson, won the Challenge and the Shield. The only competitor successful during the contest against the winner was Mr. E.C. Joshua, whose picture, “Retiring from Labor”, last year, is now on its way for exhibition in the wider fields of the Home lands.

For the Outings picture, the double award was to W. Warner. The President’s prize for the best slide for the year was awarded to W. Churchill Fisher, who gave a late twilight effect to a scene in Hen and Chicken Bay, Hawkesbury River.

Mr. H.J. Trowbridge furnished a series of slides in demonstration of modern processes of toning, and Mr. J. Paterson a series of slides in natural color from his collection of three-color and poly chrome studies.

Prizes were distributed, votes of thanks accorded to the judges and others rendering services in the exhibition and the meeting concluded with enthusiasm in respect to what had been accomplished in the past and exultation in the hope of better things to be achieved in the immediate future.

J.T.T. Harding
Press Correspondent




22nd July 1909  Page 368 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
The competition for the Temple Stephen’s Shield was the keenest that has been fought for many a long year. The work as a whole was very even. There was no running away with the prize as has been the case in previous years and we can sympathize with the Judges in the difficult task they had. It is not surprising that some hold that the first place should have been awarded elsewhere; at the same time no one can honestly quibble at the decision. Upon analysing the opinions expressed, one is forced to the conclusion that it is only a predilection to a certain class of work that prompts the desire to see another picture placed instead of the winner. The number of pictures exhibited — 27 — shows the interest taken, which must be very gratifying to Mr. Stephens.

The honor of winning the final competition fell to a new member, Mr. E.L. Brown, who has distinguished himself elsewhere. “A Foggy Morning”, the title of the winning picture, was the successful print in the Seascape section of the late Working Men's College Photographic Club’s Exhibition. The members of the Association were greatly pleased to see that Mr. J.H. Mulvany had secured the second place with a very good picture of Collins Street, looking east from just above Elizabeth Street.

It is a pity that the author did not print in some clouds, which would have materially improved the picture. The Flower Seller’s truck in the foreground is well placed and the reflections from the wet street give a rather pleasing effect. Mr. J.B. Hayles two pictures claim attention. The tone rendering is very fine and the Judges must have had some difficulty in standing "A Wet Day in Collins Street" aside.

Dr. Hollow's “Farm on the Hill” is rendered in delicate gray, with a splendid range of tones, all in the low key and is well deserving of the praise bestowed on it. In “Distance” he is not quite so happy. The horse in the foreground is rather distracting. Mr. Stephens must have rejoiced to see the Oils on the wall and Mrs. William Smith (the winner of Messrs. Baker and Rouse’s Trophy in the late Victorian Photographic Affiliation Exhibition) is to be congratulated for her rendering of “White Gums”. Mr. W.J. Jackson’s “Evening Reflections” is deserving of attention, as also Mr. C. Hardie’s picture “Daybreak on the Yarra Track”.

The Association is to be congratulated on the high standard of work exhibited. The Association is arranging for another Shield to take the place of the Temple Stephens and it is hoped that the Special Committee, Messrs. J.H. Mulvany, A.J. Relfs and F. Dutton will make a regulation that new work must be shown and that a picture obtaining an award elsewhere should be debarred. A competition of this nature is to encourage members to advance the standard of their work, which can only be done by continual practice. No member should be allowed to live on past work. The meeting of the 16th June was devoted to testing members slides and quite a number of interesting pictures were thrown on the screen. A promising feature of this year’s slide-testing was the large number of slides produced by new members and by their co-operation the Association have got together a splendid set for circulation among the Photographic Societies in the other States. So far, Tasmania is the only State to accept the Association’s invitation to exchange sets of lantern slides, yet the Council have hopes of inducing the other States to reciprocate in this direction.

F. DUTTON
Press Correspondent.




22nd November 1909  Page 601 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
Several successful meetings of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria have been held during the past month and both the demonstrations and illustrated lectures have been well attended, which must be very pleasing to those responsible for them.

On the 20th October, Mr. J.W. Symons demonstrated “Enlarging”, which was highly instructive. He expressed himself well pleased with the Association’s enlarging apparatus, which in his opinion was all that could be desired.

Mr. J.W. Eggleston invariably draws a bumper house and his lecture on 27th October, entitled “A Tour in Spain and Tangiers”, was no exception and proved a very enjoyable evening.

On 10th November, Mr. Anketell Henderson gave a very interesting exhibition and demonstration of apparatus designed to simplify photographic work, which was full of useful wrinkles from start to finish. Mr. Henderson informed his audience that he was a lazy man as far as photography went. He believed in simplifying work as much as possible and if he could make some mechanical device for doing the work, so much the better. During the evening he more than proved to members that he, at least, had been very successful in this direction.

The Council met as usual on the 3rd November, when Mr. N.C. Deck, of the Photographic Society of New South Wales was present and received a hearty welcome from the Council. At the conclusion of the business, he kindly exhibited a large number of his prints, which were appreciated by those present. The Historical Society wrote, asking the Council to arrange for several old buildings to be photographed and the members of the Council undertook to carry out the work as early as possible.

The entries for the “Still Life” competition were disappointing as far as numbers are concerned, but the work shown on the whole was highly creditable. Some how or other “Still Life” is not popular. Mr. J.B. Hayles was successful in carrying off the first and second place.




Monday 4th July 1910  Page 8 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

An attractive little exhibition of amateur photography is now open at the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria rooms, 57 Swanston-street. It has arisen out of the interstate club competition for Mrs William Smith's Ravenswood trophy, a handsome plaque which has been won by the Photographic Society of New South Wales with a very taking group, consisting of six panels amongst which "A Summer's Dream" (E. Edwards, "Evening at Hornsby" (Harold Cazneaux)and "A Whispering Wavelet" (Norman C. Deck), may be noted as illustrating the purpose of photography and its ability when rightly manipulated and put unrestrainedly to correct use, to create attractive and pleasing results. The second prize fell to the Working Men's College Photographic Club, with a group of six. "A Foggy Morn", "Sunlight Playground" and "Home ward through the Sand Dunes", standing out for technical qualities A quaint study has been sent by Mr. A. J.Payne, of Albury, with the title of "A Mile a Minute", showing two handsome collies sitting upright in a motor, a difficult plate to treat successfully. Clifton Hill, East Malvern, Kapunda (South Australia) and South Tasmanian clubs also contribute a number of clever prints.



22nd February 1912  Page 61 - Harringtons Photographic Journal

The twenty-eighth annual report of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, reveals a very satisfactory state of affairs, showing, as it does, a steadily increasing interest in the Association's doings.

There is at present a membership of 102, seventeen new members having joined during the year just closed. The increase is due to some extent to the fact that junior members are now admitted, the subscription being 10s. per year. The Association is anxious that more of the younger camera workers should bear this in mind.

During the year the association was fortunate in having a very interesting list of Lantern Lectures by the best-known amateur photographers of Victoria.

The demonstrations that were given on the many interesting branches of photography were always intelligently and enthusiastically listened to. Social-talk Nights were also a great success.

The usual annual competitions held this year in June, created much enthusiasm, Mr. Churchill Fisher gaining the much coveted championship, Mr. E.L. Brown and Mr. Howieson gaining 2nd and 3rd places.

The one-man show of Mr. E.L. Brown was a most enjoyable feature of the year. Altogether there were 33 pictures hung, all of them being very much appreciated by the members.

The enrollment of many members was directly traced to the show cards that have been exhibited in the stock houses, advertising the Association.

Altogether the year just closed has been a most successful one and members are to be congratulated on the healthy condition their Association is now in.




22nd March 1912  Page 94 - Harringtons Photographic Journal

This old-established association, the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, held its first meeting after Christmas recess, on the 14th February. There was a good muster of members who spent an enjoyable evening in discussing "Shutters" and "Exposure Meters". It was interesting to see and hear of the many different shutters used from a "hinged flap of cork lifted by hand by means of a piece of elastic" to the wonderful "one action modern focal planes". Exposure meters were then discussed and all sorts of wonderful contrivances were shown or explained and according to the narrator, each was infallible.

On the 28th February Mr. Auketell Henderson gave a demonstration on "Automatic apparatus for enlarging and reducing. He brought with him and showed the working of the instruments he had designed and made and explained the method of construction so that the merest novice learnt something that he could do for himself without elaborate apparatus and much expense. It was simply wonderful to see how Mr. Henderson could reduce or enlarge to any definite size by one touch of a lever. Altogether it was one of the finest and most practical demonstrations we have had.




22nd October 1912  Page 319 - Harringtons Photographic Journal

Mr. Harvey, the veteran amateur photographer of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, has been on holidays in New South Wales. While in Sydney, Mr. Harvey had a busy time looking up his many old friends and incidentally, exposing plates; he was an interested visitor to the meetings at the Photographic Society of New South Wales rooms. We were glad to see Mr. Harvey looking well and happy and trust his holiday in our State will be very beneficial to him.



22nd May 1913  Page 257 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
We have started our new club year under favorable conditions. New members are joining us, our syllabus is extra good and we have fresh members in our council, so it lies with our members to make the year a success or otherwise.

On 9th April, Mr. W. Howieson gave a practical demonstration of enlarged negative making, so very necessary in these days of small cameras and big prints. He detailed the various methods of making the positive transparency and as a means that was available to all of us, advocated the use of any fine-grained ordinary photographic plate. This should be backed and exposed and developed to obtain every atom of detail in the original negative, with no excessive contrast in any part. From this transparency a bromide enlargement negative is made. From this paper negative, after spotting out defects and blemishes, the print is made and the enlarged picture obtained. Mr. Jones, a visitor from the Liverpool Photographic Society, stated that it was hard to get a smooth-surfaced, thin, grainless bromide paper suitable for the enlargement. He advocated the use of a small quantity of linseed oil to destroy any grain that might be in the paper.

On April 16th Mr. A. J. Woodley gave us another of his American lectures. This time it was New York. Needless to say, his photographic skill, and a long period of residence in the city, enabled him to give an extremely interesting account of the city of skyscrapers. The building of these towers of business and residence was seen in its many stages, and showed to what perfection engineering skill is brought in America. The lecture was much enjoyed by those present as an illustration of something outside our own continent, and clearly indicated that our own engineers and architects are quite up to date with our Australian buildings.




21st June 1913  Page 331 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
On the 14th May there was a very good attendance of members to hear and see Mr. O.H. Coulson’s demonstration on Color Photography by means of the “Tripak” camera and accessories. This camera is an invention of Frederic Ives, who has done so much to advance three-color photography and it is the embodiment of simplicity. Only one lens is used and the three plates for the red, blue and green negatives are in one pack of three. They are all exposed simultaneously through the necessary color filters, which are parts of the camera and require no fixing, etc. The developing is done, all three plates at the one time, in Glycin, by means of a very ingenious holder which goes with the camera. After you have the three negatives you print on to bichromated gelatine or thin celluloid. The resulting positives are stained red, yellow and blue in the usual way and then superimposed to get the finished picture. Mr. Coulson explained each process step by step and showed the work in all its many stages of progress, from the plate to the negative and from the negative to the finished positive in each separate color, non stained and then stained. The resulting picture, a study of flowers and fruit, was very beautiful.

On the 21st May we had a crowded house to hear Mr. F. Dutton’s account of his trip round the world. As Mr. Dutton is an Australian and a good photographer, with a good camera, we had a real treat. He showed us the things he considered out of the ordinary and needless to say, we enjoyed them as much as he did. His lecture demonstrated stronger than ever the uselessness of a tour without a camera to bring back to your friends the sights you have seen.

As our ordinary receipts did not allow of the payment for dark-room, etc., it was decided to use other means. We did so by asking members to donate pictures that could be distributed by means of sixpenny tickets and a ballot. The result was over £30 in hand.

We have had one or two changes in our officers. The president, Mr. J.A. Smith, resigned, so we elected Mr. J.B. Grut, an artist and a photographer, in his place. Then our veteran lanternist, Mr. R. Ferguson, retired from active work, his mantle falling on Mr. Warner, his assistant. Mr. H.H. Wood was elected assistant.




22nd July 1913  Page 388 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
On 18th June, Professor Skeats D.Sc., F.G.S., was due with an illustrated lecture, entitled “Architecture of Nature”. Some of us were puzzling to think how this came in as camera work, but we were soon put at our ease when the Professor spoke. He showed by means of photographs used as lantern slides how the hills and valleys of our world were formed, how the sea coasts are rising or sinking, how the rain and the wind are continually cutting away the hardest of rocks and how even the feathery snow and frosts are the most powerful of natural forces, every one of which is continually working away to cut down our mountains and fill up our valleys. All these he was enabled to explain in a popular manner by means of a slight knowledge of photography.

On the 28th we had a little relaxation in the form of an outing to Alphington. About 20 members met at the train and were soon at the destination and cameras were at work all round. As usual, there were all sorts of medal pictures there “IF” — you know the rest. These outings are of much value in bringing members, more especially the working, in touch with one another and thereby letting your methods of working being seen by others, for there are many points to be learnt in the “field".

On 2nd July and the following days were red letter ones with us. We had a one-man show of the work of Mr. Norman C. Deck. This gentleman’s name is a household one amongst Australian camera men. He forwarded some three dozen examples of his work, which were duly hung in our rooms. Almost every picture was a bromide — but what a bromide! Every tone, from light silvery gray in the “Whispering World” to etching black in “The Lake’s Edge”. Then in sepia and brown, most pure in color, were “White Gums”, “Qui Vive” and “Australian Valley”. The great object lesson to us all was that most, if not all, of these beautiful pictures gave every appearance of being pure and simple direct photographs and if so they will do more to advance pictorial photography amongst us than anything else that has been exhibited here.




22nd August 1913  Page 444 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
The members turned up well on 9th July, to listen to Professor Orme-Masson’s special lecture upon “Photo. Chemistry”. The matter was dealt with in a very thorough and detailed manner and all present were treated to an account of the action of the light upon the photographic plate and the action of the various so-called developing chemicals to produce the latest image so formed. It was very interesting to have what we call “exposing” and “developing” so lucidly explained to us from the scientist’s point of view, which, to say the least, set many of us thinking and wondering that such simple and everyday actions should be so full of chemical and physical mysteries. On the 16th July we had another good muster to hear an account of our “Victorian National Park” by Dr. T.S. Hall. The lecturer explained that the area forming the park consisted of Wilson’s Promontory and was not intended as a resort for tourists, but as a sanctuary for our native fauna and flora, which are so rapidly being destroyed. By means of lantern slides the doctor gave us a good idea of what the country was like and showed that some parts of the coastline would well be worth a visit from the photographer, especially as much of the some hundred odd square miles is practically unknown.



Monday 15th September 1913  Page 10 - The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW)

AUSTRALIAN EXHIBITION
PRACTICAL FEDERAL MOVEMENT

The first All Australian Exhibition promoted by the Associated Chambers of Manufactures of Australia, was opened on Saturday by the Governor-General, Lord Denman. Wet weather prevailed, but the attendance was very good. At luncheon Sir John Madden remarked that of all that had been done since 1901 this appeared to be the most practical Federal movement that had occupied the attention of the chamber. It was an effort to lay aside the differences that afflicted the various States and bring them all together in the same competitive ring and assisting in the purpose of influencing the world in favor of Australia. The whole of the main hall, concert hall, inner and outer galleries, in addition to 40,000 feet of space made available by the erection of an annexe; is occupied and the exhibition will be open till 8th November.

Victorian and New South Wales artists have sent a splendid assortment of pictures to the art court. The Victorian collection numbers nearly 200 and the N.S.W. Society of Artists added 47 more. The exhibition of photographic work is being conducted and managed by the council of the Victorian Photographic Affiliation and some excellent camera studies are on view. The awards so far made are: Pictorial: "A Bend in the Road", N.C. Deck, gold medal: "Rippling River Reflections", C.J. Merfield, gold medal; "Pearly Morn", A. Wilkinson, silver medal; "A Bubbling Brook", N.C. Deck, bronze medal.

Pictorial (open to those who have previously not exhibited): "Wintry Sunset", Miss V. de Blaquiere, silver medal; "Off Wilson's Promontory", J.T. Hamilton, bronze medal; "The Pool", H. Brown, diploma; "Old Folks at Home", H.B. Hammond, diploma. Collection exhibited by one competitor: N.C. Deck, gold medal. Inter-club competition: Clifton Hill Amateur Photographic Club, 1; Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, 2 and 3, Photographic Society of New South Wales 4.




22nd September 1913  Page 490 - The Australasian Photographic Review

GREAT ALL-AUSTRALIAN EXHIBITION
Following is a list of awards in the photographic section of the “Great All Australian Exhibition”, which opened on the 13th September.

Twelve club sets were entered in the Inter-Club Competition, sets coming from the Auckland Camera Club, Adelaide Camera Club, Northern Tasmanian Camera Club, besides the Victorian clubs and two sets from the Photographic Society of New South Wales.

There were over 450 entries in the photographic section and the work is of an exceedingly high-class nature, being the largest photographic exhibition held in Victoria since the Victorian Photographic Affiliation Exhibition in 1909.

We congratulate the winners on their success, particularly mentioning Mr. Norman C. Deck, of Sydney, who must have sent an extremely strong exhibit to have secured three medals.

AWARDS:


SECTION A: CLASS I:
GOLD MEDAL
“A Bend in the Road”
Norman C. Deck
Sydney
SECTION A: CLASS I:
GOLD MEDAL
“Rippling River Reflections”
C.J. Merfield
Victoria
SECTION A: CLASS I:
SILVER MEDAL
“Pearly Morn”
A. Wilkinson
Adelaide
SECTION A: CLASS I:
BRONZE MEDAL
“A Babbling Brook, Berry”
Norman C. Deck
Sydney
SECTION A: CLASS II:
SILVER MEDAL
“Wintry Sunset”
Miss C. De Blaquiere
SECTION A: CLASS II:
BRONZE MEDAL
“Off Wilson’s Promontory”
J.T. Hamilton
SECTION A: CLASS II:
DIPLOMA
“The Pool”
H. Brown
SECTION A: CLASS II:
DIPLOMA
“Old Folks at Home”
H.B. Hammond

“ONE MAN SHOW” SET, GOLD MEDAL, NORMAN C. DECK

INTER-CLUB COMPETITION:

FIRST
Clifton Hill Amateur Photographic Club
No. 1 set
SECOND
Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria
No. 1 set
THIRD
Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria
No. 2 set
FOURTH
Photographic Society of New South Wales
No. 1 set

The judges in Classes I and II, were Messrs. C.D. Richardson, C.E. Harvey and A. Barrie; Classes III, IV, and V. will be judged next week.



22nd September 1913  Page 499 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
On 13th August, Mr. E.C. Joshua gave a practical demonstration on working Lumiere Autochrome plates. Two exposed plates were developed in the dark for six minutes. Then the lights were turned on and all the subsequent processes, reversing, fixing, etc., done before the members. The results were good and barring the dangers of frilling, the process is a good and useful one.

On 20th August the president gave an illustrated lecture descriptive of his visits to Venice, the city of art. Mr. Grut is an artist as well as a photographer, so his slides were carefully chosen and good, many of them suitably colored. It seemed strange to us dry Australians to see a city without streets and dust and with boats taking the places of trams and cabs, but the camera proved that it was so.




22nd October 1913  Page 556 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
On the 10th September, Mr. C.J. Merfield gave a practical demonstration on “Working the Carbon Process” and clearly indicated to those present that this beautiful method was amongst the easiest and cheapest for photographers to take up. The results in color value and permanency fully justified its use and the demonstrator was surprised that so few worked it. Exposed tissue was developed, and all the points in single and double transfer were fully explained in such a simple and popular way that any beginner could understand.

On the 17th September, Mr. P. Barrachi F.R.A.S., Government Astronomer for Victoria, gave one of his unique and instructive lectures on “Photography of the Heavens”. The lecturer pointed out that photography was of the greatest value in astronomical work and in fact, in all work of a recording character and showed by means of lantern slides how photography was automatically registering, every earth tremor and also the movements of the magnetic currents that are continually taking place. Then some wonderful photographs of the sun in eclipse and the moon and last, but not least, some plates showing the countless stars that fill the celestial space. This star charting has been going on for about 20 years and is only now completed. Without photography it would have been impossible, as numbers of the stars are visible to the photographic plate alone. Needless to say, the lecture was listened to with rapt attention and all went away with the full knowledge that they had been given a glimpse of the great unknown.

We have adopted a diploma as an award for our competitions. It was designed by one of our members, Mr. Coulson and is printed in carbon for first award and bromide for second, the competition and the winner’s name being filled in as required. As a slight token of appreciation it was unanimously agreed to present the first diploma to Mr. Norman C. Deck for the splendid “One Man Show” he gave this association.

Our Alphington outing gave the following results; Mr. Hayles and Mr. Grut were awarded first and second diplomas respectively.

At the All Australia Exhibition this association got second place in the “Club” competition, Mr. Merfield one of the “gold medals” and Mr. J.T. Hamilton a bronze medal.




Saturday 29th November 1913  Page 21 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)
Thursday 4th December 1913  Page 3 - The Yackandandah Times (Vic.)
Friday 5th December 1913  Page 2 - Wodonga and Towong Sentinel (Vic.)

THE LATE Mr. CRAVEN - POPULAR PARLIAMENTARIAN - SUCCESSFUL CAREER
Widespread regret was caused by the announcement in the second edition of "The Argus" yesterday that Mr. A.W. Craven M.L.A., had died at his residence, Moonee Ponds. Mr. Craven suffered last month from an internal hemorrhage and, although his condition was critical, his medical adviser, Dr. Dickinson, Moonee Ponds, reported a slight improvement as the weeks passed. The end, however, came somewhat suddenly at about 2 o'clock yesterday morning. The immediate cause of death was heart failure. Mr. Craven was a prominent country member of the Legislative Assembly, of which he had been Chairman of Committees for the last nine years. He was born in Yorkshire in 1855 and came to Victoria when only a year old. His father was for many years identified, with mining enterprises in Bendigo, where deceased spent his boyhood. Mr. Craven was educated at Bendigo in the old Corporate High School, from which so many Bendigonians who afterwards made their mark were sent out into the world. Mr. Craven took up surveying as a young man and achieved considerable, distinction in his profession. He entered the Legislative Assembly in 1889 for Benambra and sat continuously for that district until his death. That was the first Parliament elected after a redistribution of seats had increased the members of the Assembly to 95. There was a great infusion of new blood, which included Sir John Taverner, Mr. Trenwith, Sir Alexander Peacock and Mr. Craven. Sir Alexander Peacock is the only one of the number elected for the first time to that Parliament who is now remaining. When Mr. E.H. Cameron relinquished the position of Chairman of the Standing Committee on Railways to take a position in the Irvine Ministry, Mr. Craven became chairman of the committee, of which he had been a member for some years. He held that position till after the election of 1904, when he was made Chairman of Committees in the Legislative Assembly, a position which he retained till his death. He was undoubtedly one of the most popular members of the State Parliament and a man who possessed many friends, both in public and private life. Mr. Craven was for 23 years a member of the Victorian Institute of Engineers, of which he had been vice-president and at the time of his decease was a member of council. For 31 years he was a member, fellow and president of the Victorian Institute of Surveyors. For many years he was an enthusiastic member of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria. He was one of the board of examiners for mining surveyors, one of the board of visitors to the Melbourne Observatory and to the Land Surveyors Board. Professional associates of Mr. Craven express the highest admiration of his ability as a surveyor.


A.W. CRAVEN

Born 1855 Yorkshire, England
Died Friday 28th November 1913 Moonee Ponds, Victoria




23rd March 1914  Page 148 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
Once more we are in full swing after the Christmas recess. The 30th annual meeting was held on the 4th February, and the balance sheet and report showed that the past year had been one of our best. The roll of members is increasing rapidly and greater interest is being taken, photographically, so 1914 should also be a record year.

We started off well with an illustrated lecture by Mr. Chandler, descriptive of bird life in Victoria. A photograph of the district under consideration was shown and then those of the birds and nests found in it. Mr. Chandler is a skilled photographer and an ardent naturalist, so all the slides displayed and the description given of them were interesting in the extreme. lectures like this do much to encourage photography because they show the great necessity of a camera and the skill to use it, in getting an authentic record of anything for the information of others.




22nd April 1914  Page 204 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
On the 4th March we opened a “One-man show” of pictures by Mr. John Kauffmann. Eighty pictures were hung and needless to say, everyone was worthy of a place. The bulk, if not all of the pictures, were bromides of medium sizes, most artistically mounted on light mounts and in the many tones now so prevalent. Mr. Kauffmann cannot be adequately thanked for showing his works with the sole object of proving what can be done in pictorial photography, if the work is gone about in the right way and he may rest assured that his laborious work will be the means of greatly improving future exhibitions of work by anyone lucky enough to see what he has done.

On the 11th March Mr. O.H. Coulson gave a practical demonstration of the “Paget Color Process”. Every stage of the work was clearly explained by colored diagrams and negatives and positives from the taking screen to the finished and bound transparency. Mr. Coulson exhibited some 30 specimens of his work, which included landscapes and seascapes, flowers, etc., which were very true in the color rendering and transparency and as slides were perfect.

The March meeting was a novelty, inasmuch that a lecture was delivered by three persons, Mr. R.H. Croll, Dr. Heber Green and Mr. P.R.H. St. John. It was descriptive of a walking tour of some 250 miles in the wilds of Eastern Gippsland. Mr. Croll gave a general account of the tramp and the scenery and Dr. Green and Mr. St. John, as naturalist and botanist, described those sections in which they specialized. The lecture was thus exceptionally interesting. The innovation is worthy of following by other clubs who may not be strong in individual lecturers.

On the 8th April Mr. E.C. Joshua gave a short paper entitled, “Is Pictorial Photography worthwhile?”. As Mr. Joshua is one of the leading amateurs his remarks were of value. He said that pictorial photography should be pure photography and not photography by manipulation on the negative and print in the endeavor to make a picture. Then, again, photographic picture making should be original. Nearly all of the so-called pictorial photographs in our exhibitions were more or less imitations or copies in idea of reproductions of the work of English and Continental workers in our photographic literature. The keyword of good photography was “be yourself” don’t imitate others. Photographs should not be taken with the idea of winning a plaque or a useless medal. When all was said and done, the prize picture was so only on the opinion of one or more judges, not of many. In his opinion there should be no prizes. Photographs should be selected by a good selection committee, and if considered worthy, hung and exhibited. This should be honor enough. All present greatly enjoyed the breezy way Mr. Joshua dealt with his subject and the many plain home truths he spoke.




22nd June 1914  Page 216 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
We had one of our best attended meetings for some time to hear Dr. Hugh L. Murray’s illustrated account of his Continental trip. The doctor is one who delights in getting out of the usual track of the globe-trotter and going on his own and being also a keen observer and good photographer his lectures always draw. His account of his excursions into quaint old towns and buildings and the troubles he got into for photographing where he should not, through want of language — knowledge was extremely interesting, as he always got what he wanted and managed to offend no one. The beautiful and new scenes he showed and described thoroughly satisfied all present.

On 13th May, Mr. J.B. Hayles, one of our sterling and consistent workers gave a practical demonstration on “Exposure and Development in Relation to Gradation in the Negative”. This was a big subject and one we see discussed in the photographic press very often. Mr. Hayles handled his subject in a very able manner and by means of negatives and prints in great numbers and series clearly proved that both exposure and development were both factors in governing gradation in the negatives. Altogether the demonstration was a good and practical one of a very difficult subject and those who were fortunate enough to be present obtained good and useful instruction. More papers like this are greatly required in our clubs and societies.

On the 20th May, Mr. A.J. Woodley, by special request, his lecture of "Canada and the Niagara Falls". Mr. Woodley resided in Canada for some years and was never tired of going to see its wonderful falls, for half Niagara belongs to it. The scenery and the account of Canada and its settlers was very interesting, especially as Canada is a rival with our Commonwealth for immigrants; but the snow scenes, though very beautiful, made one wish for our own sunny land. It is extremely difficult to photograph Niagara on account of the ever lasting mists, but Mr. Woodley secured many unique views of the falls under every phase summer and winter, sun and rain and all were beautiful. Not the least wonderful of the views were those showing how the sightseers are catered for, but the almighty dollar rules and a deep purse is required.

Our Association was not successful in winning the Plaque offered by the A.P. Affiliation for the best six prints in the “Club” competition, losing the first place by three points only. We were equal in “Composition” and “Technique”, but lost in “Display”. This “Display” must be watched carefully or it will entirely do away with “individuality”, which is the main object of competition.




22nd July 1914  Page 373 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
On the 10th June Dr. H. Riddell-Stanley gave a practical demonstration of working autochromes to a large number of members. The doctor, who has made a specialty of autochrome work, fully explained how he obtained the beautiful examples he exhibited and by means of a stereoscope a great number of transparencies were shown, which included all subjects in color from portraits to interiors and all were good and clearly proved that for true color rendering the autochrome is one of the best.

On June 17th Dr. W.H.C. Rock gave a lantern lecture entitled “The French Revolution”. True, this had nothing to do with photography, but it was an innovation which was greatly appreciated by everyone present. The doctor, by means of slides of the best prints and engravings obtainable of the events of this stirring period, backed up by a splendid description of the scenes shown, quite enthralled his listeners, the unanimous verdict being, “one of the best lectures of the year”.

On the 1st July was our annual social and exhibition of the year’s work. The social took the form of a musical evening and was contributed to by some of Melbourne’s best known artists. Reminiscences were given by Mr. Tonbridge and Mr. Watt, who had prints they had made as far back as 1851 and the account of their photographic troubles were very amusing. The exhibition of the year’s work showed much improvement, but pictorial work only scored.

On 8th July we had an extra good muster at Mr. Anketell Henderson’s paper and demonstration on “Optics of Bromide Printing". Mr. Henderson is one who is always improving apparatus and inventing fresh methods and instruments to further his work and views. The tables were covered with all sorts of tricky apparatus to demonstrate his subject — from the way to get the “candle foot” power of any light to obtaining the speed of any bromide paper. The means he showed of obtaining the working powers of an emulsion was very interesting and clearly proved that in conjunction with the power of a light a plate or paper had “lazy” and “tired” portions and only a small part was normal. It was simply marvelous how by means of a simple looking home-made apparatus, vast mathematical calculations disappeared and one saw the result obtained by such a simple thing as moving a candle a little bit one way or another. The Association is deeply indebted to Mr. Henderson for placing the results and methods of years of work as its disposal.




22nd September 1914  Page 488 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
On the 19th August Mr. H.C. Dannevig delivered an instructive and extremely interesting lecture on “Fish and Fisheries”. Mr. Dannevig is in command of the Commonwealth trawler, “The Endeavour”, so his discourse and pictures, both by lantern and by cinema, were all descriptive of the piscatorial treasures pertaining to the coasts of our native land. The pictures shown were therefore practically all of the hitherto unknown and consequently, the attention and interest of all present were sustained until the end. The Association is grateful to Mr. Dannevig for finding time to entertain them so usefully.

The 12th August found a good attendance of members to see our President, Mr. J.B. Grut, give his evening on “Picture Making by Photography”. Mr. Grut, being more an artist than photographer, explained, by means of lightning sketches in charcoal, the constituents of a picture, from the artist’s point of view. All the tricks of putting in and leaving out, the controlling of light and shade and dozens of the other little things that an artist does to arrive at some ideal representation of a scene or portrait were detailed. Mr. Grut explained the five chief points in picture making, viz., composition, balance, contrast, breadth and tones and by means of his charcoal sketches showed in a few moments what was meant by the terms used. All through the lecture was good and a practical object lesson to those photographers who are striving to rival the artist.

On 9th September, Mr. Churchill Fisher gave a practical demonstration on Lantern Slide Making. He described the different methods and showed how by means of working the developer and the exposure together uniformity or diversity in color and tones could be obtained. As Mr. Fisher is a past master in slide work, everyone present learnt something. How to make the cunning printing frame and binding clip not being the least.




23rd November 1914  Page 608 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
We had a most interesting lecture by Mrs. T.T. Campbell, entitled “A Trip Along the N.W. Coast of Tasmania”. An illustrated lecture by a lady is a novelty and Mrs. Campbell enjoys the unique position of lady lecturer amongst our Victorian photographic societies, so there was a splendid attendance. The slides shown were all good and faith fully portrayed the wonderful scenery of the King and Gordon rivers, Port Macquarie and many other beauty spots. It is a pity more ladies do not give us their experiences as Mrs. Campbell does, for ladies describe things in quite a different manner to men.

Another instructive lecture was given by Mr. J.T. Hamilton, descriptive of his explorations with two companions in the wilds of N.W. Gippsland. As this was the real land of the unknown, the many beautiful slides of the wonderful scenery, backed up by the narrative of the lecturer, made the evening pass all too quickly. We hope to hear Mr. Hamilton again, as he delights in these wild trips and it is far nicer to see them than do them.

On the 4th November the members met for a discussion on “Color Plates”. Autochromes were the favorites for the stereoscopic man, but the Paget was favorite for lantern work. Mr. Woodby, Mr. Coulson, Miss Strattock and Dr. Sabelberg contributed to the success of the evening.




15th April 1915  Page 213 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
We have started our new year under good prospects, notwithstanding the war depression. The reports and balance-sheet, read at the annual meeting, indicated that the association was not falling back. There were few changes in the officers and council, the chief one being the retirement of Mr. Pattison as Hon.Secretary and the election of Mr. W.E. Mate as his successor. The syllabus for the coming year is a remarkably good one and the endeavor has been made to cater for all requirements in our art.

On 10th February, one of our members gave an evening on “Lantern Slides and How to Make Them” and though this is a hackneyed subject, he gave those present some good points.

On 17th February, a very interesting lecture was given by Mr. W. Warner, entitled “Camera and Caravan". The lecturer illustrated a trip he and his family took in a caravan over some 200 miles of the beautiful Healesville and Upper Yarra country. It was a revelation to those present, the combination of camera and caravan in a trip of this kind and it is strange more do not avail themselves of it. It is reasonable in cost; you can choose your own spots to camp and be quite free from all the troubles of the usual tourists accommodation places.




Tuesday 27th April 1915  Page 2 - Ararat Chronicle and Willaura and Lake Bolac Districts Recorder (Vic.)

The older generation of Stawell residents regretted very much to the demise of Mr. A.J. Relph, which took place on Thursday. The deceased, who during his boyhood resided with his parents in Stawell, was 61 and had been in the employment of the State Government for 40 years, for a long time past having been officer in charge of the advertising branch of the Government Printing Office. He was for some years Hon.Secretary of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria and he took an intense interest in photographs, some of his creations being of a very high order of merit. His early boyhood trips to the Grampians made him an enthusiastic lover of those glorious mountains and their wild beauty appealed to him so strongly that he paid periodical visits to their fastnesses and in season and out of season he preached those glories by means of illustrated lantern lectures throughout the suburbs. One of the peaks standing sentinel over Hall's Gap has been called "Relph Peak" and it is fitting that he should be so remembered, for no man has done more to bring these everlasting hills under public notice.



15th January 1916  Page 44 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
On the 8th December the President, Mr. J.B. Grut, demonstrated “Coloring and Tinting Lantern Slides”. Starting with an explanation of the primary, secondary and tertiary colors, illustrated by means of a chart, he showed the simplest way of coloring or tinting a slide by means of flat washes of color laid on all over the film side, previously well damped, commencing with blue and blending into pink, then yellow to the horizon and repeating those colors again below and continuing right down to the foreground, etc., without any attempt at picking out detail. Then by means of a specially constructed box of his own design, which could be used for viewing slides as well as a support when coloring them, he proceeded to give a practical demonstration of the coloring of a lantern slide, using the stamp colors supplied by Kodak. The result when viewed in the box was very successful.

On the 15th December, Mr. C.J. Merfield provided a lecture on “The Melbourne Observatory and its Work” and an entertaining and enlightening lecture it proved. After dispelling some erroneous ideas connecting meteorology with astronomy, the lecturer showed slides of the various buildings of the observatory exterior and interior, also the various telescopes and other instruments used therein, including the telescope known to the astronomical world as the “Great Reflecting Telescope of the Melbourne Observatory", with which some very valuable work has been done. Several fine slides of photographs of the moon showing the craters on the surface, also of eclipses of the sun, groups of stars and of various comets, etc., were shown and created great interest.




15th March 1916  Page 156 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
On the 9th February our new Hon.Secretary, Mr. G.S. Bush, gave an interesting evening on the “Photography of Furniture”. By means of a number of photographs of pieces of furniture taken on various plates and through different screens, the superiority of the panchromatic plate with a suitable screen for the color of the wood, was proved to the satisfaction of all.

The evening of the 16th was originally down on the syllabus for a lecture by the late Mr. Relph, so several of the members kindly volunteered to fill the gap by showing slides of various subjects. A fine collection resulted which included natural color photography, a series of humorous drawings, a number of fine pictorial slides and some night scenes of Melbourne streets; also a large number of slides illustrative of travel in foreign countries. The following members lent slides and gave such information as was necessary when they were shown on the screen; Messrs. Gent, Coulson, Hayles, Trowbridge and Mulvany and the Hon.Secretary, Mr. Bush.




15th May 1916  Page 274 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
A Print Trimming Competition was held on the 1st March, and an instructive evening it proved. A number of prints were supplied to the members present, also a couple of angle pieces of card as guides for trimming. When each member had trimmed his print to the best advantage, as far as his ideas went, the prints were numbered and handed in to the President (Mr. Grut), who judged them and commented upon each one, explaining his reasons for choosing the winning prints and rejecting others. Much beneficial advice and instruction was the result to all concerned.

Mr. Howieson provided the entertainment on the 8th March with a demonstration on “Exposure and Development". After describing the various exposure meters obtainable, the demonstrator recommended the selection of a meter that measured the actinic value of the light, such as Wynne, Watkins or the Imperial Meter. The various methods of development were then explained — the old dish method with all its uncertainties, the factorial system devised by Watkins; the chief objection to this method, it was pointed out, is the risk of fog, it is necessary to hold the plate close to the dark-room lamp, so that the first appearance of the image can be noted, consequently, with color-sensitive plates, this method is dangerous.

Time and temperature development was fully dealt with. A series of six negatives of the object, together with prints, was shown. The exposures were 1, 2, 4, 8 seconds, at f/45, bright sunlight, the last negative having had 32 times more exposure than the first. The first four negatives (1/4, 1/2, 1 and 2 seconds exposure) all produced good prints, while the prints from the other two negatives (4 and 8 seconds exposure) were passable. It was a good example of the wonderful latitude of the modern dry plate; also, that it is possible to develop various exposures together. A number of plates (the exposure of each of which had been estimated by the use of an exposure meter) were then developed. The resultant negatives were all good and all practically the same density. Considerable discussion ensued, the result of which was that the methods advocated by Mr. Howieson were generally approved of.

On the 15th March, Mr. Le Souef, the Curator of the Zoological Gardens, gave the members and their friends one of the most entertaining and educational lectures yet given in the rooms of the Association, the subject being “Various Reptiles and Birds”. The lecturer was not only instructive, but at times decidedly humourous and kept his audience in a simmer of laughter at many of his anecdotes. About eighty slides were shown and created great interest.




16th April 1917  Page 218 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
The annual meeting was held on 11th February 1917, when the Hon.Secretary and Hon. Treasurer submitted their annual statements for the year, which show the Club to be in a very flourishing condition. During the year 11 new members were admitted, five of whom were ladies.

On taking the chair, the new President (Mr. Merfield) paid a very high tribute to the work of the retiring President (Mr. J.B. Gout) and pointed out the necessity of co-operation in all matters relating to the art and life of the Association and urged upon his hearers the necessity of doing all in their power during these present unsettled times to work together in the interests of the Club, so that once peace was restored and things in general became normal, we would be ready to enjoy the benefits that were bound to follow.

On 23rd February the usual monthly lecture was given by Mr. F. de Castella on “Southern France and Medieval Warfare”, the first half of the lecture being devoted to the culture and development of the grape and wine industry in Southern France. The second half of the lecture was devoted to ancient methods of warfare.

The next monthly lecture will be given on 21st March by Mr. A.H. Mattingley on “The Mysterious Mallee” when we hope to have a large attendance.

The members and friends will be pleased to know that a letter has been received from our late press correspondent, Mr. O.H. Coulson, who is at present on active service. In it he gave us a few amusing sidelights on life on a transport. He states that he is kept busy doing his bit and that he is in the best of health.

The program for April is; 4th, Members Night; 11th, Snapshot Photography by Messrs. Bush and Mate. Both those gentlemen have been and are ardent workers for the Snapshots from Home League and have some amusing experiences to relate; 18th, Mr. Dudley le Souef will give a lecture on “Australian Natives and Their Camps".

Saturday 24th March, the Club will have an outing to Kooyong under the guidance of Mr. Harvie. All knights of the camera with their lady friends will be made welcome.




15th May 1917  Page 270 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
On 14th March, Mr. C.J. Merfield gave a demonstration on “Tones on Bromide Papers”. Using permanganate of potash for a bleacher, the lecturer demonstrated how one could get from warm black to a rich sepia by varying the time in the bleacher. During the evening a series of prints were toned, the time varying from five seconds to full bleaching of print. All the tones were of pleasing color. The bleaching and toning baths were made up from the following stock solutions:

Permanganate of Potash 160 grs; Water 20 ozs; lO per cent. Solution Soda Sulphide.

For sepia tones take: Stock Solution 2 drs. Salt 80 grs. Sulphuric Acid 20 mins. Water 8 ozs.

Develop in: 10 per cent. Solution Sulphide 2 drs. Water 10 ozs.

To get the proper rich sepias, Mr. Merfield recommended a generous exposure and slow thorough development, using:

Amidol 1 gr. Soda Sulphite 8 gr. Pot. Bromide 5 gr. Water 1 oz.

The image is slow in coming up and stops automatically when fully developed.

On 21st March, Mr. A.H. Mattingley gave a very interesting lecture on “The Mysterious Mallee”. A feature of the lecture was a large number of beautiful slides, showing us the wild birds in their native haunts. They represented a vast amount of patience and enterprise on the part of the lecturer in bringing together such a valuable collection of slides.

On 24th March the Club had their usual monthly outing to Kooyong.

On 9th May, Mr. R.W. Harvie will demonstrate “Simple Methods and Formulae”. As he has the happy knack of getting over the rough roads by the shortest possible route, we are sure to learn something to our advantage from him.

On 16th May the Ven. Archdeacon Hay man will lecture on “The English Lakes”. The slides are, we understand, beautifully colored and as the Archdeacon has travelled extensively through England, his lecture will be of more than usual interest, as at this time most of us have some friend over there.




15th June 1917  Page 329 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
At the meeting of 4th April, Mr. C.J. Merfield gave a practical demonstration on Passe Partout mounting, in which the members were given a number of hints which added to the effectiveness of this attractive style of finishing prints. On 11th April, Messrs. Bush and Mate gave a very interesting resume of their work in connection with the “Snapshots from Home League”. It was gratifying to learn that this association lead the way both in numbers and quality of work done in all the Commonwealth. Mr. Dudley Le Soeuf gave a very interesting and educational lecture on Australian Natives and their Camps.



14th July 1917  Page 387 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
June 13th — Mr. J.H. Mulvany gave a practical demonstration on Home-made P.O.P. Mr. J.W. Styles gave a lecture on China and Japan, which was much appreciated by the large audience. On July 11th — not the 4th, as per syllabus — we hold our annual social, when an excellent program has been arranged and a very enjoyable evening assured. The Association intend holding an exhibition of members work on 1st August. The club’s diploma will be awarded for the best and next one sent in. The exhibition is confined to members only. August 8th will be devoted to an exhibition of members slides, and Mr. A.T. Danks will take us for a trip through the Cities of Europe.



15th October 1917  Page 547 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
A very successful exhibition of pictures was held in the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria rooms during September. In all, about 60 prints were sent in and hung on the walls. Mr. Howieson carried off the diploma with a very fine study of gum trees. Messrs. C.J. Merfield and J.B. Grut acted as judges and prepared a criticism of all the work which was read before a full meeting of members.

A departure from the usual monthly lecture was made by holding an exhibit of photographic apparatus, ancient and modern, contributed by various members. Through the untiring efforts of Mr. R.W. Harvie the venture was a great success and has done a lot to stimulate the interest in photography. The cameras were varied and many, from a Daguerreotype to the latest model Cirkut panorama machine. One exhibit that attracted considerable attention was an old Goerz panorama with water lens, the negatives being made on curved glass plates. Mr. Harvie had a large assortment of beautiful flower studies for the stereoscope, also a large number of colored transparencies made by the Sanger Shepherd process.

The first outing for the season will take place on 27th October, to Coburg, when we hope to see a large turn out of members. On 14th November, Mr. J.B. Grut will lecture on “Composition in Landscape” and Mr. F.B. Fabert will lecture on 21st November, “With the Camera in England”. We would direct attention to the special meeting called for 31st October, to be held in club rooms. Mr. Anketell Henderson will have his machine there for the purpose of testing shutters and apparatus. This will be an excellent opportunity for all members to have their apparatus tested and put into order for the coming season.




15th February 1918  Page 90 - The Australasian Photographic Review

THE GOLLIWOG
J.B. Hayles

From the Exhibition of the
Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria




15th February 1918  Page 93 - The Australasian Photographic Review

LANDSCAPE
W. Howieson

From the Exhibition of the
Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria




15th February 1918  Page 93 - The Australasian Photographic Review

A SUNNY GLADE
H.E. Kennedy

From the Exhibition of the
Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria




Friday 18th January 1918  Page 6 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)
Saturday 19th January 1918  Page 2 - The Border Morning Mail and Riverina Times (Albury, NSW)
Tuesday 22nd January 1918  Page 4 - Darling Downs Gazette (Qld.)
Thursday 24th January 1918  Page 2 - Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic.)

Mr. W.E. Mate, vice-president of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, has received a request from Lieutenant Kenneth Hare, curator and Hon.Secretary of National War Museum, Westminster, London, for war photographs of all officers and men who have given their lives, or who have received honors and decorations during the present war. These photographs are for a record in the National War Museum and to be of a permanent and historic value for all time. Photographs should be bromide (unmounted), not larger than 10 inches by 8 inches, with full particulars attached of name, regiment (or ship), rank, date of death or decoration. Mr. W.E. Mate will give any further particulars desired, or will forward photographs to their destination upon receiving same. His address is "The Bungalow", Ivanhoe.



Thursday 14th March 1918  Page 2 - Singleton Argus (NSW)

WAR HEROES
PHOTOGRAPHS TO BE PRESERVED

The Federal Government has decided to follow the example of the British War Museum authorities, and obtain photographs of the men who have given their lives in the war, and of others who have won awards and decorations.

In order to avoid duplication of the effort Mr. W.E. Mate, vice-president of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, who has undertaken on behalf of the British War Museum to collect the photographs, will do the same for the Australian War Museum now being established.

The Defense Minister is asking the friends and relatives of such soldiers to present two copies of each photograph for the purpose. The photographs should be unmounted bromide prints of not larger size than 10 by 8 inches. They should be accompanied by the necessary details and posted to Mr. Mate, The Bungalow, Ivanhoe, Victoria, who will acknowledge them.




15th May 1918  Page 273 - The Australasian Photographic Review

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
At the annual meeting of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria held in February, Mr. C.J. Merfield, President, being in the chair. Mr. R. Ferguson was elected Vice-President in place of Mr. Mate — resigned; Messrs. Love and Lloyd being elected to the Council. All the other officers were re-elected for the ensuing year. The Treasurer. Mr. J.B. Hayles, submitted his report, which shows the organization to be in good standing. The Hon.Secretary reports an increase of six new members. One resignation was recorded during the year. Six of the members are serving with the colors in various parts of the world. It has been decided by the Council that owing to the stress of times to demit the members night from the syllabus for the remainder of the war. Mr. W. Howieson opened the new session with a demonstration on “The development and handling of films”. The following month, Mr. C.J. Merfield followed up with “The fixing and washing of plates and papers”. The demonstrator strongly advocated the use of an acid fixing bath, using the B.J. formula diluted by one half with water. This, he explained, was made necessary owing to the warmth of our Australian climate. For washing he recommended a rapid rinse in water, then soaking for five minutes in water; this changed four or five times at five minute intervals was sufficient and was preferable to most of the mechanical washes that were on the market. After a discussion, both for and against both above methods, the demonstrator gave demonstration on the “Making of enlarged negatives”.



Thursday 17th June 1920  Page 6 - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)

Mr. FREDERIC ARCHER KERNOT
PRESIDENT in 1890

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
Deep regret will be expressed at the news of the death of Mr. Frederic Archer Kernot, president of the Melbourne Athenaeum, which occurred at a private hospital in East Melbourne on Tuesday night, after a short illness. Mr. Kernot, who was the son of the late Mr. Charles Kernot M.L.A. and a brother of the late Professor Kernot, was born at Geelong, where he was educated. On leaving school he was apprenticed to a Geelong dentist. Later he went to Sydney and after practising there for some years, returned to Melbourne. Mr. Kernot had always taken a prominent part in improving the position of dentistry as a profession. He was identified with the formation of a society to protect the public from quack dentists, was instrumental in the formation of the Odontological Society of Victoria and was one of the first members of the Dental Board of Victoria. He was also one of the examiners for the Dental Board and a member of the council of the Australian College of Dentistry, as well as an active founder of the Dental Hospital. Mr. Kernot was a keen amateur photographer and at one time president of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria. He was a member of the committee of the Austin Hospital and of the Volunteer Motor Association and rendered valuable service in connection with returned and wounded soldiers. Mr. Kernot leaves a widow, but no family. The funeral will take place at the Brighton Cemetery this afternoon.



15th August 1921  The Australasian Photo-Review - Page 414

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
This Association, founded in 1883 as the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria, is the oldest photographic organization in Australasia and like many other institutions, was compelled to reduce its activity considerably during the years of war, but now that things show signs of settling, the amateurs in the Southern City decided to make an effort to restore it to something like its original position.

To bring this about a conference of delegates from some of the Melbourne Associations was held a few weeks ago and the generally expressed opinion was that an amalgamation or federation of those who were then represented was desirable in order to form a stronger body.

With this idea in view the Clifton Hill Amateur Photographic Club and the Pictorial Workers Association decided to link up with the Photographic Association of Victoria, the former bodies becoming virtually sections of it and the federation was effected in May last, within a few days of the 38th anniversary of the foundation of the original Society.

On the 26th May, the proceedings of the federated body were initiated by a lecture by Mr. J.H. Harvey F.R.V.I.A., who gave an account of the history of the photographic lantern slide and a description in detail of every photographic process which has been adopted for the production of this form of photograph from the earliest times.

Among the processes described were the albumen, wet collodion, dry bath plates, collodio-bromide, washed collodion emulsion, gelatino-chloride, gelatino-bromo chloride, gelatino-bromide, carbon and woodbury type and examples of slides produced by each of these methods were shown on the screen.

The lecturer remarked that it was scarcely to be expected that many Australian workers would, at the present day, engage in slide-making by any but the gelatine processes, seeing that such excellent commercial plates are manufactured in Australia and he merely described and illustrated the other methods as a matter of history and for the purpose of imparting information, as some of the processes mentioned would probably, on the “passing out” of the few who practised them, become lost arts.

The following Council was elected: President. Dr. J. Hollow; Vice-Presidents, T.P. Grut and O.H Coulson; Treasurer, A.M. Henderson, F.R.V.I.A.; Hon.Secretary, F. Dutton; Assistant Secretary, J. Williams; Council, W.W. Elliott, J.H. Harvey F.R.V.I.A., R.W. Harvie, W. Howieson, H. McCrindle, W. Warner; Lanternists, R.W. Harvie and W. Warner; Librarian, J.H. Mulvany.




14th January 1922  The Australasian Photo-Review - Page 50

PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
Two meetings have recently been given up to the pictorial side of photography.

First, there was an exhibition of work by the members of the “Pictorial Workers Association”, a very extensive collection being hung and a good attendance of members and visitors indicated that the display was appreciated.

The prints shown were principally the work of Messrs. Coulson, Merfield, Howieson, Williams, Hayles, McCrindle, Stevens, Eaton, Field, Page Hammond and others and the treatment of the subjects dealt with was of a very varied character.

At the last meeting, Messrs. Howieson and Coulson addressed the members on the making of enlarged paper negatives. Mr. Howieson led off by describing the procedure adopted by himself and he showed the character of intermediate transparency necessary and also exhibited enlarged negatives on both glass and paper, together with prints from these, at the same time expressing his preference for glass as a support for the film. Mr. Coulson confined his remarks more particularly to the preparation of the enlarged negative for printing and quoted various points from his own practice in the manipulation of the negative for the production of prints.

The evening was rendered more interesting by the discussion and detailing by other members of their experience when they set to work to improve negatives.




15th July 1922  The Australasian Photo-Review - Page 351

PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
During May two meetings of the Association were held. At the first members submitted prints for criticism. The prints were then numbered and corresponding numbers were handed round, when each member wrote a free criticism of the print, the number of which he had drawn. The names of the producers of the prints were unknown until after each criticism had been read out, consequently the critics were no respecters of persons and some very candid opinions were chronicled.

The criticism being of a constructive as well as a destructive nature, much useful information was gained by the makers of the prints.

The second meeting was devoted to a description of a visit to the Yarrangobilly Caves, N.S.W., which was given by Mr. J.H. Harvey F.R.V.I.A., and illustrated by 100 lantern slides from negatives made by the lecturer, a comprehensive series illustrating the whole of the caves which are open to visitors.




15th August 1922  The Australasian Photo-Review - Page 416

PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
A recent evening was devoted to an exhibition of prints, at which about seventy were on the walls. These were principally landscape, though two or three examples of architecture and a few specimens of figure-work were shown. There were also two fine prints of groups of dogs, photographed by Mrs. Montgomery. Among the other exhibitors were such well-known names as Coulson, Howieson, Eaton, Williams, Webb, McCrindle and Weiss.



15th September 1922  The Australasian Photo-Review - Page 468

PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
During the month two meetings were held. At the first a demonstration of coloring photographs was conducted. Mr. Howieson undertook the coloring of fruits and Messrs. P. Harvie and J.B. Grut showed different methods of coloring lantern slides.

There was a good attendance of members and as all three demonstrators were at work at the same time and the members filed round the table to watch operations, the room presented a very animated appearance.

The interest displayed by all those present was very great and during the course of work numerous questions were asked and answered, which showed that the demonstration was popular and valuable.

At the annual meeting, held at a subsequent date, the council for the year 1922-23 was elected: President, Dr. J. Hollow: Vice-Presidents. Messrs. J.B. Grut and O.H. Coulson: Hon.Secretary, Mr. F. Dutton: Assistant-Secretary, Mr. J. Williams: Members of Council, Messrs. R. Harvie, W. Warner, W. Howieson, H. McCrindle, C. Webb and J.H. Harvey.

During August two meetings were held. At the first, Mr. J. Williams gave an outline of the process of printing in gum-bichromate, with a practical demonstration of the sensitizing of the paper for this method. He also showed examples of work produced by the process. Following this, Mr. C. Webb submitted a number of prints for criticism.

There was an average attendance and each member gave his opinion regarding one or more of the prints. The criticisms were dealt with in both a constructive and destructive manner and the varying views of the critics upon certain points must have been, at times, rather bewildering to the exhibitor. As long as it is given and taken in a proper spirit, free criticism of this nature is an effective and valuable means of education.

At the second meeting Mr. O.H. Coulson treated the members to a masterly dissertation on “The Improving of Negatives for Pictorial Work”. He insisted upon a good negative as an absolute necessity at the start and recommended the use of panchromatic plates and screens, emphasized the importance of studying the subject well, choosing the most suitable conditions of weather and of lighting for the production of the desired result. He further advised workers to make sure that in the dark room operations they left nothing undone in order to obtain the most suitable negative possible for the production of the picture which they had in view.

He exhibited examples showing the result of photographing the same subject from different points of view and explained why that one which he considered the best to illustrate what he intended to secure, was the best.

He then showed simple means of effecting such improvements to the negative as he deemed necessary, by softening high lights by means of Baskett’s Reducer and modifying the gradation by the use of “Negafake”, showed how he produced ground glass expeditiously by the grinding of two glasses together with fine corrundum powder between them, so that the matted glass, worked upon by crayon and stump, might be used as a backing to the negative during printing. Following this, the control permitted by the shading of portions of the image during the process of enlarging was brought under notice and the demonstration was made complete by the showing of negatives which had been improved by the methods enumerated, together with the finished prints from them, ready for exhibition.

During September two meetings were held. At the first, on the 14th, the Pictorial Workers Section showed a collection of prints which it was intended to forward to London for exhibition. The exhibitors were Messrs. O.H. Coulson, J.B. Eaton, A Field, W. Howieson, H. McCrindle, P. Hammond. C. Stevens and J. Williams. Among the visitors was Mr. W. Van der Velden, of Sydney, who was formally welcomed by the President.

At the meeting on the 28th Mr. W. Howieson took charge and addressed the members on the subject of “Lenses and Color Filters”, dealing with many of the optical principles upon which photographic lenses are constructed and the characteristics of the different types; color filters were then enlarged upon, the different effects of various kinds being explained.




15th December 1922  The Australasian Photo-Review - Page 632

PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
Two meetings were held during the month of October. On the 12th, Messrs. Williams, Eaton and Howieson exhibited photographs of a pictorial nature and each exhibitor addressed the members on the subject of “Pictorial Photography” and detailed the lines upon which the work which he showed had been produced. At the request of the President (Dr. Hollow), Messrs. J.B. Grut and J.H. Harvey also expressed their feelings regarding the production of work of a pictorial character.

On the 26th the business took the form of a “Members Lantern Night." Slides were shown by Messrs. McCrindle, Weiss, Webb, Ward and Harvey. After the mixed collection had been exhibited, Mr. J.H. Harvey gave an abstract of the process of manufacturing paper, illustrating his remarks during the lecture by a series of lantern slides showing the whole of the machinery and processes, as conducted at the mills of the Australian Paper Co.




15th January 1923  The Australasian Photo-Review - Page 49

PHOTOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA
During November two meetings were held. At the first an exhibition of work by the members of the Junior Pictorial Section was arranged for, the members criticising and adjudicating upon the work which had been brought up, the exhibition being in the nature of an examination in order to show what progress had been made by those who were anxious to qualify for admission to the Senior Pictorial Workers Section.

The work of all those who exhibited was considered to be of a high order and it was arranged to transfer the whole of the exhibitors to the Pictorial Workers Section.

At the second meeting, Mr. J.B. Greet presiding, the death of Mr. A.M. Henderson, until recently Hon. Treasurer of the Photographic Association of Victoria, was reported and it was decided to forward a letter of condolence.

The principal business of the evening was the exhibition of specimens of Home Portraiture by Mr. McCrindle, all the negatives having been made by electric light and in addition to this rather unique exhibit, other portrait work was shown by various members.

Death has been busy among the photographers during the last few weeks. Following closely upon the demise of Messrs. R.W. Harvie and E.C. Joshua, came the death, on 15th November, of Mr. A.M. Henderson at the ripe age of 70.

Mr. Henderson was one of the leading architects of Melbourne and was well known throughout the Commonwealth and in New Zealand.

The deceased gentleman graduated at the Melbourne University, taking the degree of C.E. He was an accomplished amateur photographer and a skilled and enthusiastic lanternist and used the camera very extensively in connection with his professional work. Whilst pursuing, this hobby he devised several hand cameras and accessories, some of which were of a most original type. He was also Treasurer of the Photographic Association of Victoria.

Of late years he had given great attention to sensitometry, constructing many pieces of apparatus of a simple and effective nature for the purpose of testing the speeds of plates and papers and he introduced novel methods of working in connection with these. He also devised many improvements in the optical lantern.

The writer, who in his younger days was well acquainted with him, witnessed many experiments and demonstrations illustrating lectures on physical science which he gave, for he possessed an extraordinary amount of energy and activity, was always busy at something and retained his youthful bearing until a few months ago.

Personally, Mr. Henderson had a very genial and pleasant manner and was regarded by all who knew him as a cultivated gentleman and true friend.




Tuesday 3rd July 1923  Page 9 - The Age (Melbourne, Vic.)

Mr. James Musgrove, patentee of the broadcast seed sower, drill, mower, registered as the Victory patents, died at St. Aidan's Hospital, Moonee Ponds, a few days ago at the age of 75 years. He did all his own casting and invented many improvements at the Green Vale Foundry. Apart from usual business life, deceased was a keen photographic enthusiast and did much during his long membership in the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria to develop the industry is this State. Electricity, X ray, crayon and other drawings, ranked among his pastimes. He planned and erected a windmill - the only one of its kind in Australia for the purpose of generating electricity for lighting purposes. He leaves a daughter and three sons. He was buried at Bulla cemetery, the funeral service being conducted by Rev. G.W. Ratten, an old friend of deceased.



15th October 1927  Page 501 - The Australasian Photo Review

A few days ago, Victoria lost an old amateur photographer, Mr. John Hammerton, of Geelong, having passed away.

Mr. Hammerton, who had been in anything but good health for a long period, was, for many years, Hon.Secretary of The Gordon College Amateur Photographic Association, Geelong and later served as President on several occasions. When, about 35 years ago, the Association decided to organize an inter-colonial Exhibition and Congress of Photography and photographers, he became one of the Hon.Secretaries to it and assisted in carrying to a successful issue the first Photographic Congress held in Australasia. Some years ago, in recognition of his great services to the Association, he was elected an Honorary Life Member. (The Gordon College Association, after the winding up of the Amateur Photographic Association of Victoria a few years since, became the oldest Amateur Photographic Society in Australasia and one of the oldest in the British Empire, outside the United Kingdom).

In addition to photography, Mr. Hammerton was interested in nature study and had at his home in Geelong, a well-stocked private museum which contained a valuable collection of articles of interest in which birds figured largely. His death has left a notable gap in the ranks of accomplished amateur photographers in Victoria.